Curved Seat-Stays and Vibration/Shock absorption

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Alpine Rider, Mar 14, 2003.

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  1. Alpine Rider

    Alpine Rider Guest

    I'm wondering if curvy seat-stays really absorb any more road vibration versus straight seat stays
    of the same material?

    A few bike makers claim they do whiles others of course say there is no difference. I know the main
    triangle doesn't flex much vertically but with those curvy seat stays like on litespeeds, sevens,
    merlins do they bend a little more since the curve exposes them to more bending forces and allow a
    slightly smoother ride?

    Thanks

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  2. Appkiller

    Appkiller Guest

    Oh, yes, and don't believe the earlier posts you might find on this question by self-styled experts
    such as Jobst and Sheldon and Peter and Andy and Mike. They don't know nothin' 'bout bikes. Listen
    to the marketing - vertical compliance like a lazy-boy combined with lateral immoveability is only a
    second mortgage away.

    Seriously, I think the only bike with curved seat stays that make any difference is the Serotta Hors
    Categorie, which actually has some sort of shock in the stay.

    App

    Alpine Rider <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm wondering if curvy seat-stays really absorb any more road vibration versus straight seat stays
    > of the same material?
    >
    > A few bike makers claim they do whiles others of course say there is no difference. I know the
    > main triangle doesn't flex much vertically but with those curvy seat stays like on litespeeds,
    > sevens, merlins do they bend a little more since the curve exposes them to more bending forces and
    > allow a slightly smoother ride?
    >
    > Thanks
     
  3. > I'm wondering if curvy seat-stays really absorb any more road vibration versus straight seat stays
    > of the same material?

    If they work like a fork, I doubt it; TREK switched from curved to straight-bladed forks, kept the
    offset exactly the same, and I can't tell any difference whatsoever (I was, I'll admit, expecting
    them to be stiffer, just 'cuz). Somebody might claim that a fork is different (from a seat stay)
    because it's not held in place at the far end?

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  4. Chluu907

    Chluu907 Guest

    I switched from a Cannondale CAAD2 road frame, which had straight seat stays to a Cannondale CAAD4
    road frame, which has curved seat stays. I cannot discern any difference in comfort between the two
    bikes. The CAAD4 is much stiffer in the bottom bracket area and is a bit lighter. I definitely can
    feel those differences when pedalling.

    I think you'll have an easier time controlling shock absorbtion with your tires. I ran Vredestein
    Fortezza Tri Comps at 145psi. That was absolutely brutal. Went back to my old Michelin Axial pros at
    110-115psi and was very comfortable.

    Claude
     
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