custom cassette question

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Kbh, Mar 19, 2003.

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  1. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    In the past I've made my own custom cassettes by swapping certain cogs in and out, but the shifting
    is never quite as good as a stock shimano cassette because the ramps don't line up. Two thoughts
    just occured to me:

    1) FToo bad Shimano had to make their cassettes idiot proof, with sprockets only going on in one
    orientation, so we can't manually line up the ramps on our custom cassettes.

    2) Is there a safe way to alter either sprockets or the hub body so that you can orient the new
    sprocket so its ramps line up properly? My concern with this (say I filed the sprocket) would be
    that the sprocket wouldn't engage the hub body well enough and could be stripped. But then again,
    Sheldon sold me some sprockets that appear to have their inner edges cut so that they work with
    Shimano and Campy, or something like that - the inner edges are very strangely shaped and don't
    make "full" engagement with the splines of the hub body, probably only half of them - and I've
    never had a problem with them (except that they don't shift all that well).

    Kyle
     
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  2. Grenouil

    Grenouil Guest

    "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In the past I've made my own custom cassettes by swapping certain cogs in and out, but the
    > shifting is never quite as good as a stock shimano
    cassette
    > because the ramps don't line up. Two thoughts just occured to me:
    >
    > 1) FToo bad Shimano had to make their cassettes idiot proof, with
    sprockets
    > only going on in one orientation, so we can't manually line up the ramps
    on
    > our custom cassettes.
    >
    > 2) Is there a safe way to alter either sprockets or the hub body so that
    you
    > can orient the new sprocket so its ramps line up properly? My concern
    with
    > this (say I filed the sprocket) would be that the sprocket wouldn't engage the hub body well
    > enough and could be stripped. But then again, Sheldon sold me some sprockets that appear to have
    > their inner edges cut so that they work with Shimano and Campy, or something like that - the inner
    > edges are very strangely shaped and don't make "full" engagement with the
    splines
    > of the hub body, probably only half of them - and I've never had a problem with them (except that
    > they don't shift all that well).
    >
    > Kyle
    >
    You only have to file one spline on the sprockets - the wider one by the index mark. Widening this
    one should enable you to orient the sprockets in any position. IMHO it shouldn't make any difference
    to the integrity of engagement on the hub.....
     
  3. Shimano Hyperglide cogs have one wide tab which will fit only into the one wide space on the freehub
    body and this is why the cogs go on only one way. You can file off half of this wide tab (or all of
    it for that matter) and then you can put the cog on any way you like (even flipped over with the
    ramps on the wrong side to do any good). Even if you file this wide tab off completely there will
    still be seven or eight tabs to hold the cog which is plenty. Many freewheel cogs used to be held
    with just 3 or 4 tabs.

    Bob Taylor
     
  4. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In the past I've made my own custom cassettes by swapping certain cogs in and out, but the
    > shifting is never quite as good as a stock shimano
    cassette
    > because the ramps don't line up. Two thoughts just occured to me:
    >
    > 1) FToo bad Shimano had to make their cassettes idiot proof, with
    sprockets
    > only going on in one orientation, so we can't manually line up the ramps
    on
    > our custom cassettes.
    >
    > 2) Is there a safe way to alter either sprockets or the hub body so that
    you
    > can orient the new sprocket so its ramps line up properly? My concern
    with
    > this (say I filed the sprocket) would be that the sprocket wouldn't engage the hub body well
    > enough and could be stripped. But then again, Sheldon sold me some sprockets that appear to have
    > their inner edges cut so that they work with Shimano and Campy, or something like that - the inner
    > edges are very strangely shaped and don't make "full" engagement with the
    splines
    > of the hub body, probably only half of them - and I've never had a problem with them (except that
    > they don't shift all that well).

    If you trim the largest spline back to the size of the others you'll lose only one-ninth of the
    contact area. In an all-steel system that won't make any practical difference. You'll essentially be
    back to the UG system as far as cog orientation possibilities. I do not see any downside here.

    To trim the spline we use a Nicholson carbide coated wire which fits in a hacksaw frame. Hold the
    cassette horizontally in a vise and trim away the offending splines all in one pass.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  5. "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > In the past I've made my own custom cassettes by swapping certain cogs in and out, but the
    > shifting is never quite as good as a stock shimano cassette because the ramps don't line up.

    The ramps mostly help when downshifting (i.e. going to a larger cog). So, especially for larger
    jumps, try to use cogs that were mated together. For instance, if you want 21-26-34, try to use the
    34 that came with a 25 or 26 (megarange) instead of one that came with a 30.

    As others said, it is fairly easy to file one tooth, I did so some time ago, but for a totally
    different reason. As I shift in friction mode -- more foulproof in Winter -- I found it works better
    if cogs are reversed, so they work as unramped cogs (old fashioned style, I know).

    Regards,

    Michel Gagnon

    Two thoughts just occured to me:
    >
    > 1) FToo bad Shimano had to make their cassettes idiot proof, with sprockets only going on in one
    > orientation, so we can't manually line up the ramps on our custom cassettes.
    >
    > 2) Is there a safe way to alter either sprockets or the hub body so that you can orient the new
    > sprocket so its ramps line up properly? My concern with this (say I filed the sprocket) would
    > be that the sprocket wouldn't engage the hub body well enough and could be stripped. But then
    > again, Sheldon sold me some sprockets that appear to have their inner edges cut so that they
    > work with Shimano and Campy, or something like that - the inner edges are very strangely shaped
    > and don't make "full" engagement with the splines of the hub body, probably only half of them -
    > and I've never had a problem with them (except that they don't shift all that well).
    >
    > Kyle
     
  6. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On Wed, 19 Mar 2003 22:56:02 GMT, "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >1) FToo bad Shimano had to make their cassettes idiot proof, with sprockets only going on in one
    > orientation, so we can't manually line up the ramps on our custom cassettes.

    I've had good luck in filing the allignment tab flat and then rotating the cog to the position you
    want. Sometimes you cannot find the exact position. The allignment is more important on smaller cogs
    than the larger ones.
     
  7. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    harris cyclery/sheldon brown have a piece on custom cassettes
     
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