Custom shue orthotics to spread the pressure?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Jerry Sievers, Mar 21, 2006.

  1. Hello.

    I am wondering if it makes sence to have some molded hard plastic
    insoles made by a orthotist or other in order to relieve the pressure
    from the ball of the foot?

    Such a thing wouldn't necessarily have to cover the entire foot sole
    but at least from the toes to about mid-arch. It would have to be
    aggressively contoured to apply pressure to the areas that are
    normally recessed, anterior arch etc.

    Most of the long distance cyclists that I train with complain of
    pressure related discomfort, myself included. No one that I know of
    has done much of anything about it.

    Any experiences like this or other solution?
     
    Tags:


  2. On 21 Mar 2006 21:27:09 -0500, Jerry Sievers <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Hello.
    >
    >I am wondering if it makes sence to have some molded hard plastic
    >insoles made by a orthotist or other in order to relieve the pressure
    >from the ball of the foot?
    >
    >Such a thing wouldn't necessarily have to cover the entire foot sole
    >but at least from the toes to about mid-arch. It would have to be
    >aggressively contoured to apply pressure to the areas that are
    >normally recessed, anterior arch etc.
    >
    >Most of the long distance cyclists that I train with complain of
    >pressure related discomfort, myself included. No one that I know of
    >has done much of anything about it.
    >
    >Any experiences like this or other solution?


    I know a bunch of cyclists who use orthotics. In most cases it's to
    address pain or irritation in the knee or hip that are caused by foot
    problems. This can help with foot pain from pressure too.

    I had some custom orthotics from Bill Peterson in Rhode Island that
    were great. Now I use Sole footbeds, which are semi-custom -- you put
    them in an oven to heat them slightly and re-shape. www.yoursole.com.
    This are quite a bit cheaper than custom orthotics and can work for
    some people. Superfeet insoles are another over-the-counter product
    that some people like.

    JT



    ****************************
    Remove "remove" to reply
    Visit http://www.jt10000.com
    ****************************
     
  3. Skippy

    Skippy Guest

    "Jerry Sievers" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hello.
    >
    > I am wondering if it makes sence to have some molded hard plastic
    > insoles made by a orthotist or other in order to relieve the pressure
    > from the ball of the foot?
    >
    > Such a thing wouldn't necessarily have to cover the entire foot sole
    > but at least from the toes to about mid-arch. It would have to be
    > aggressively contoured to apply pressure to the areas that are
    > normally recessed, anterior arch etc.
    >
    > Most of the long distance cyclists that I train with complain of
    > pressure related discomfort, myself included. No one that I know of
    > has done much of anything about it.
    >
    > Any experiences like this or other solution?
    >


    Orthotics work. It may be wise to tell the professional that they're for
    cycling and take your shoes along.

    I've used Specialized BG shoes with good results on the bike and Superfeet
    for running shoes.

    From previous experience a lot of (forefoot) discomfort is the result of too
    small and/or narrow shoes. This seems to be a cycling thing, especially for
    road shoes.


    Skippy
    E&OE
     
  4. On 21 Mar 2006 21:27:09 -0500, Jerry Sievers wrote:

    > Most of the long distance cyclists that I train with complain of
    > pressure related discomfort, myself included. No one that I know of
    > has done much of anything about it.


    If the sole is very stiff, the shoe fits well and you're not tensing your
    foot in it, I don't see how this can occur. The "hot spot" effect is caused
    by constriction of blood flow due to swelling of the foot in an overly
    tight shoe, apparently.

    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
  5. Derk

    Derk Guest

    Jerry Sievers wrote:
    > I am wondering if it makes sence to have some molded hard plastic
    > insoles made by a orthotist or other in order to relieve the pressure
    > from the ball of the foot?

    I have three pairs. 1 for my cycling shoes and I couldn't live without them
    any more. I immediately feel it when I forget to put them in my shoes when
    I change shoes. The price here for custom made orthotics is 120 Euro's.

    Why would you take hard plastic? Well made ones breathe which is important.

    Greets, Derk
     
  6. "Skippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Jerry Sievers" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Hello.
    > >
    > > I am wondering if it makes sence to have some molded hard plastic
    > > insoles made by a orthotist or other in order to relieve the pressure
    > > from the ball of the foot?
    > >
    > > Such a thing wouldn't necessarily have to cover the entire foot sole
    > > but at least from the toes to about mid-arch. It would have to be
    > > aggressively contoured to apply pressure to the areas that are
    > > normally recessed, anterior arch etc.
    > >
    > > Most of the long distance cyclists that I train with complain of
    > > pressure related discomfort, myself included. No one that I know of
    > > has done much of anything about it.
    > >
    > > Any experiences like this or other solution?
    > >

    >
    > Orthotics work. It may be wise to tell the professional that they're for
    > cycling and take your shoes along.
    >
    > I've used Specialized BG shoes with good results on the bike and Superfeet
    > for running shoes.
    >
    > From previous experience a lot of (forefoot) discomfort is the result of

    too
    > small and/or narrow shoes. This seems to be a cycling thing, especially

    for
    > road shoes.
    >
    >
    > Skippy
    > E&OE
    >
    >

    I have a severe Morton's Neuroma in both of my feet. At about 40 miles my
    rides turn into a pain fest. At Interbike, there was a company that made a
    new kind of orthotic called esoles. They use some sort of scanning system
    for determining the correct shape for the orthotics. I was skeptical, but
    after a few ineffective orthotics in the past, I should be. Well, they work
    perfectly. Now I can do over 100 miles with no problems at all.

    The only problem is that you have to catch one of their reps at a show or
    event. I guess they can give you a schedule. I saw them last at the Seattle
    show. Their booth was the next row from ours.

    Bruce
     
  7. amakyonin

    amakyonin Guest

    I too would recommend trying the Specialized Body Geometry footbeds.
    They are available separately for about $20 from the website or a
    Specialzed dealer. They fit perfectly into Shimano shoes of the same
    size. They have a slight bulge under the ends of the metatarsals that
    helps to alleviate pain in that area.

    I developed problems with pain in the ball of my foot while using the
    simple die cut neoprene footbed Shimano uses in their cheaper shoes
    (Their molded footbeds are better). I ended up with some slight nerve
    damage in my big toe after a multi-day tour. After switching to the
    Specialized footbeds I haven't had any problems.
     
  8. Ken

    Ken Guest

    Jerry Sievers <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:
    > I am wondering if it makes sence to have some molded hard plastic
    > insoles made by a orthotist or other in order to relieve the pressure
    > from the ball of the foot?


    The main purpose of custom orthotics is to adjust the angles of your ankle
    and knee to reduce the risk of injury to those joints. If you're just trying
    to relieve pressure along the bottom of your foot, the gel or molding foam
    insoles sold at drug stores for a few dollars should be fine.
     
  9. mark

    mark Guest

    "Jerry Sievers" wrote ...
    > Hello.
    >
    > I am wondering if it makes sence to have some molded hard plastic
    > insoles made by a orthotist or other in order to relieve the pressure
    > from the ball of the foot?
    >
    > Such a thing wouldn't necessarily have to cover the entire foot sole
    > but at least from the toes to about mid-arch. It would have to be
    > aggressively contoured to apply pressure to the areas that are
    > normally recessed, anterior arch etc.
    >
    > Most of the long distance cyclists that I train with complain of
    > pressure related discomfort, myself included. No one that I know of
    > has done much of anything about it.
    >
    > Any experiences like this or other solution?
    >


    As a few people have said, custom footbeds/orthotics are generally used to
    align and support the ankle and the rear half of the foot, benefitting the
    knee and hip joints as well. Having said that, I've found that a good
    footbed can make the entire foot more comfortable, along with the knees,
    hips and the rest of one's body.

    When I was learning to make footbeds for ski boots, I was told that if the
    footbed corrected the alignment of the rear/posterior half of the foot then
    the entire foot would fall into alignment. This certainly worked for me, and
    it makes sense if you look at your foot and wiggle it around a little.

    As another poster mentioned, the Superfeet cut-to-fit insoles are indeed
    excellent. I've been using them in hiking shoes, running shoes,cycling shoes
    and ski boots for quite a few years and they make a real difference any time
    I have to spend a long time on my feet. When I was making custom footbeds
    for ski boots it seemed that the Superfeet cut-to-fit insoles worked about
    as well as custom footbeds for a very high percentage of customers, for a
    lot less money.
    --
    mark
     
  10. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

  11. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 21:27:09 -0500, Jerry Sievers wrote:

    > I am wondering if it makes sence to have some molded hard plastic
    > insoles made by a orthotist or other in order to relieve the pressure
    > from the ball of the foot?


    Perhaps, but I'd try stiffer shoes first.

    Matt O.
     
  12. On Wed, 22 Mar 2006 15:54:24 +0000 (UTC), Ken <[email protected]> wrote:

    > If you're just trying
    >to relieve pressure along the bottom of your foot, the gel or molding foam
    >insoles sold at drug stores for a few dollars should be fine.


    Those will compress in use and need to be replaced often. It's more
    economical to at least get quality footbeds (like Sole or Superfeet)
    for about $30.

    JT

    ****************************
    Remove "remove" to reply
    Visit http://www.jt10000.com
    ****************************
     
  13. Ken

    Ken Guest

    John Forrest Tomlinson <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:
    > Those will compress in use and need to be replaced often. It's more
    > economical to at least get quality footbeds (like Sole or Superfeet)
    > for about $30.


    Is that your experience? Which brands?

    I have been using a memory foam insole in my cycling shoes for the last 2
    years (15,000 miles). It still works great. Price was about $6 at my local
    drug store. Sorry, I no longer have the packaging and don't remember the
    brand.
     
  14. On Thu, 23 Mar 2006 00:51:36 +0000 (UTC), Ken <[email protected]> wrote:

    >John Forrest Tomlinson <[email protected]> wrote in
    >news:[email protected]:
    >> Those will compress in use and need to be replaced often. It's more
    >> economical to at least get quality footbeds (like Sole or Superfeet)
    >> for about $30.

    >
    >Is that your experience?
    > Which brands?

    Dr. Scholls and perhaps other foam/gel stuff changed within a few
    months in use.

    JT

    ****************************
    Remove "remove" to reply
    Visit http://www.jt10000.com
    ****************************
     
  15. On Wed, 22 Mar 2006 20:02:51 -0500, John Forrest Tomlinson
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 23 Mar 2006 00:51:36 +0000 (UTC), Ken <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>John Forrest Tomlinson <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>news:[email protected]:
    >>> Those will compress in use and need to be replaced often. It's more
    >>> economical to at least get quality footbeds (like Sole or Superfeet)
    >>> for about $30.

    >>
    >>Is that your experience?
    >> Which brands?

    >Dr. Scholls and perhaps other foam/gel stuff changed within a few
    >months in use.


    Upon reflection, I realize this was over 10 years ago, and perhaps the
    very inexpensive cushion insoles are better nowadays.

    JT

    ****************************
    Remove "remove" to reply
    Visit http://www.jt10000.com
    ****************************
     
  16. Matt O'Toole wrote:
    > On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 21:27:09 -0500, Jerry Sievers wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I am wondering if it makes sence to have some molded hard plastic
    >>insoles made by a orthotist or other in order to relieve the pressure
    >>from the ball of the foot?

    >
    >
    > Perhaps, but I'd try stiffer shoes first.


    Can someone recommend a _really_ stiff shoe/brand?


    --
    Scott Johnson / scottjohnson at kc dot rr dot com
     
  17. Sandy

    Sandy Guest

    Dans le message de news:[email protected],
    Scott Johnson <[email protected]!planetkc.com> a réfléchi, et puis a
    déclaré :
    > Matt O'Toole wrote:
    >> On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 21:27:09 -0500, Jerry Sievers wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> I am wondering if it makes sence to have some molded hard plastic
    >>> insoles made by a orthotist or other in order to relieve the
    >>> pressure from the ball of the foot?

    >>
    >>
    >> Perhaps, but I'd try stiffer shoes first.

    >
    > Can someone recommend a _really_ stiff shoe/brand?


    DMT
     
  18. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Scott Johnson <[email protected]!planetkc.com> writes:
    > Matt O'Toole wrote:
    >> On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 21:27:09 -0500, Jerry Sievers wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I am wondering if it makes sence to have some molded hard plastic
    >>>insoles made by a orthotist or other in order to relieve the pressure
    >>>from the ball of the foot?

    >>
    >>
    >> Perhaps, but I'd try stiffer shoes first.

    >
    > Can someone recommend a _really_ stiff shoe/brand?


    Carnac makes shoes in a range of stiffness depending on the application.
    I had an opportunity to try a pair of their Ventoux (a touring shoe,
    which is not the stiffest) and was impressed enough to covet a pair
    for myself. Actually I was more impressed with their comfortable
    (for me) fit than with their stiffness. I note they have what they
    call their "Ergo Width" feature, and with my EEE-width dogs, maybe
    that's what I liked about them.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
Loading...
Loading...