Customising you bike

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by The Murray Midg, Feb 2, 2004.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Just need some advice about customising my new racing bike.

    The problem is that it is a 54cm/21.5 inch frame and I should really have a 58cm frame for my
    height. It was such a good deal second-hand that I went for it.

    What can I do to make sure I get this bike as close as possible to fitting me?

    What are the main issues with a too small bike?

    Should I just cut my losses and get a bigger one?

    I love the bike so am hoping no.3 isn't applicable.

    Dan
     
    Tags:


  2. Daremo

    Daremo New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Messages:
    317
    Likes Received:
    0
    Your options are longer cranks, longer seat pole and longer stem to try and get your position right ......

    But longer seat pole runs the risk of snapping it ........

    Longer stem puts you more over the front wheel which can screw up steering geometry ........

    Longer cranks aren't that big a deal .........

    I've done that before. Got so enamored about getting a bike immediately that I bought a 54 cm .......... I ride a 60cm. Biggest mistake I ever made in a bike purchase. Highly recommend just selling the frame and getting something that fits so you don't f--k up your back/neck/legs/knees trying to fit something that is too small for you.
     
  3. Andre

    Andre Guest

    well, assuming your knee-pedal spindle position is correct, I suspect you will need a long, up-
    angled stem. The problem here is you'll have alot of weight on the front wheel due to a short top
    tube. If your torso is short vs. your leg length, you might be ok. When you look at how horribly the
    ONCE guys were positioned on their too-small giants, you would be tempted to think you could get
    away with it...

    --
    --------------------------
    Andre Charlebois BPE, MCSE4.0, CNA, A+ webmaster for Triathlon New Brunswick www.TriNB.com "The
    Murray Midget" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Just need some advice about customising my new racing bike.
    >
    > The problem is that it is a 54cm/21.5 inch frame and I should really have a 58cm frame for my
    > height. It was such a good deal second-hand that I went for it.
    >
    > What can I do to make sure I get this bike as close as possible to fitting me?
    >
    > What are the main issues with a too small bike?
    >
    > Should I just cut my losses and get a bigger one?
    >
    > I love the bike so am hoping no.3 isn't applicable.
    >
    > Dan
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >Just need some advice about customising my new racing bike.
    >
    >The problem is that it is a 54cm/21.5 inch frame and I should really have a 58cm frame for my
    >height. It was such a good deal second-hand that I went for it.

    Bad idea.

    >What can I do to make sure I get this bike as close as possible to fitting me?

    Have all the short tubes replaced with longer tubes that fit you.

    >What are the main issues with a too small bike?

    Fit, fit, and fit.

    >Should I just cut my losses and get a bigger one?

    Yes.

    >I love the bike so am hoping no.3 isn't applicable.

    Think how much more you would love it if it fit you properly.
    ----------
    Alex
     
  5. Robert Brown

    Robert Brown Guest

    The Murray Midget wrote:

    > Just need some advice about customising my new racing bike.
    >
    > The problem is that it is a 54cm/21.5 inch frame and I should really have a 58cm frame for my
    > height. It was such a good deal second-hand that I went for it.
    >
    > What can I do to make sure I get this bike as close as possible to fitting me?
    >

    Geez ya can't call yourself "Murray Midget" and then tell us that a 54cm frame is too small
    for you ;-)

    Let's turn this around a bit, if I may: (starting long play mode)

    How do you know that 58 cm is the ideal size for your body? It's no longer a question of saying that
    the tallest frame that does not squish your cojones when you straddle it is the right one - there
    are many other factors that decide ideal frame size - one of the more important ones being top tube
    length. If you have very long legs in relation to your upper body, then having a short top tube
    (which most often comes in connection with a much smaller frame) will be an advantage. For years I
    rode a 60 cm frame "because I could straddle it". The perfect frame for me is actually a 56 or a
    57cm. But my current frame is a Colnago 54 cm because I got it dirt cheap and I have a short upper
    body so it fits me well. The only concession I've had to make is having 4 cm of spacers between top
    of headset and handlebar stem - but then the stem is virtually horizontal (with a rising stem I
    could get rid of 1-2 cm of those spacers). Stem length in my case is 120 mm, and perfect. Just to
    complete the picture, distance from top of top tube to bottom of seat rail (measured along centre of
    seat post) is 19 cm (N.B. this is with horizontal top tube, i.e. not a "compact" frame). But this
    setup fits me like a glove.

    In your case, it's hard to know just what your experience is of riding road bikes, what frames
    you've ridden before, and your limb/trunk dimensions, to give you the right advice.

    It's possible that a few respondents have been too quick to say that you should ditch the frame.
    Could well be (who's to know), but I think you should get a qualified opinion first - someone who
    can advise you in terms of fit. Do you have a club nearby that you can join, who has really
    experienced riders who can check your riding position, or even an LBS who can give you an honest
    appraisal without just trying to sell you is a new frame?

    Here's a link, if you want to play with a configurator, while waiting for a live expert to help you:

    http://www.competitivecyclist.com/za/CCY?PAGE=FIT_CALCULATOR_INTRO

    Not even this is guaranteed to give you the perfect sizing, but it will give some indication as to
    whether the frame you have has a chance of matching your requirements or not.

    Good luck to you. I hope that you find that you can find the right combination of seat post, stem,
    etc so that you will get a good fit on the bike you bought. But if the frame really doesn't work
    then do sell it and buy something that fits better. Otherwise, your body will be reminding you every
    second of your rides, that you have the wrong frame.

    /Robert
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...