cutting carbon riser bar

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Mpt, Sep 18, 2003.

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  1. Mpt

    Mpt Guest

    I am thinking to cut a carbon riser bar I recently acquired. I was told that it has to be done with
    a special tool . Is it true? What kind of tool is that? Thanks!
     
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  2. Jim Beam

    Jim Beam Guest

    why do you want to cut it?

    be /very/ careful - these bars usually have metal reinforcing inserts where the brake lever or bar
    end clamps go. if you shorten the bar, these reinforcements effectively become misplaced and you can
    crush the unreinforced tube.

    if you just want shorter bars, shop around for a different model.

    jb

    MPT wrote:
    > I am thinking to cut a carbon riser bar I recently acquired. I was told that it has to be done
    > with a special tool . Is it true? What kind of tool is that? Thanks!
     
  3. Mpt

    Mpt Guest

    Thanks for the reply. I wanna have it cut because it's a bit too wide. "jim beam" <[email protected]>
    wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > why do you want to cut it?
    >
    > be /very/ careful - these bars usually have metal reinforcing inserts where the brake lever or bar
    > end clamps go. if you shorten the bar, these reinforcements effectively become misplaced and you
    > can crush the unreinforced tube.
    >
    > if you just want shorter bars, shop around for a different model.
    >
    > jb
    >
    >
    >
    > MPT wrote:
    > > I am thinking to cut a carbon riser bar I recently acquired. I was told
    that
    > > it has to be done with a special tool . Is it true? What kind of tool is that? Thanks!
    > >
     
  4. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "jim beam" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > why do you want to cut it?
    >
    > be /very/ careful - these bars usually have metal reinforcing inserts where the brake lever or bar
    > end clamps go. if you shorten the bar, these reinforcements effectively become misplaced and you
    > can crush the unreinforced tube.
    >
    > if you just want shorter bars, shop around for a different model.
    >
    > jb

    In all seriousness, has anyone ever crushed or damaged a carbon handlebar?? I've only seen a few
    come my way but compared to some of the incredibly sketchy titanium bars of not so long ago (<100g)
    where there are no inserts for brakes etc., most of the carbon bars I've seen seem positively
    robust! We actually took sample bar from someone (carbon..don't remember which brand..) and beat the
    crap out of it against a brick wall, putting all kinds of weight and actually jumping up and down on
    the bar and it seemed to pass with flying colours. I don't think a Ti bar would have withstood that
    much abuse. Now I'm talking about fatigue life as I'm sure a nick or cut in the carbon fibre could
    easily propagate into a big failure, but I'm more curious about the short term toughness of carbon
    bars. Any strength or fatigue tests online?

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  5. Jim Beam

    Jim Beam Guest

    > I wanna have it cut because it's a bit too wide.

    i got one earlier this year and had the same concerns, but when i looked into the insert situation,
    i elected to leave it. now i'm used to it, i'm very happy and am inclined to think the extra width
    gives you just a little more control when you need it.
     
  6. Mpt

    Mpt Guest

    The other reason why I am thinking to the bar cut is because the extra length gave me wrist pain.
    This did not happen when I had a shorter/sraight bar. I might try to adjust the bar position for now
    then. "jim beam" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > I wanna have it cut because it's a bit too wide.
    >
    > i got one earlier this year and had the same concerns, but when i looked into the insert
    > situation, i elected to leave it. now i'm used to it, i'm very happy and am inclined to think the
    > extra width gives you just a little more control when you need it.
     
  7. Jim Beam

    Jim Beam Guest

    > In all seriousness, has anyone ever crushed or damaged a carbon handlebar??

    you have a valid point. clearly, some bars are different to others. if you have a component that is
    super-thick and has no inserts, you may be ok cutting. but that's not usually the case from what
    i've seen. be careful. some of these bars are real thin - hence the need for inserts!
     
  8. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "jim beam" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:6wkab.1483$%[email protected]...
    >
    > you have a valid point. clearly, some bars are different to others. if you have a component that
    > is super-thick and has no inserts, you may be ok cutting. but that's not usually the case from
    > what i've seen. be careful. some of these bars are real thin - hence the need for inserts!
    >

    For sure it depends on the bar in question. I cringed whenever I put an 80g Ti handlebar on a
    mountain bike. It just seemed a little flimsy to me..I never considered using one myself. And I
    actually did stop and think about just how tight I was going to do up the levers on those bikes. The
    carbon bars I've seen were not stupid-light bars so that's a sure difference right there. Having
    seen other composite parts fail catastrophically (tennis racquets, hockey sticks, golf club shafts)
    I wonder if bars would do the same thing. Perhaps Kraig Willet has some bar failure tests online
    that I could check out.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  9. Mpt

    Mpt Guest

    Scott and Jim, thanks for the discussion. "S. Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > "jim beam" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:6wkab.1483$%[email protected]...
    > >
    > > you have a valid point. clearly, some bars are different to others. if you have a component that
    > > is super-thick and has no inserts, you may be ok cutting. but that's not usually the case from
    > > what i've seen. be careful. some of these bars are real thin - hence the need for inserts!
    > >
    >
    > For sure it depends on the bar in question. I cringed whenever I put an
    80g
    > Ti handlebar on a mountain bike. It just seemed a little flimsy to me..I never considered using
    > one myself. And I actually did stop and think
    about
    > just how tight I was going to do up the levers on those bikes. The carbon bars I've seen were not
    > stupid-light bars so that's a sure difference
    right
    > there. Having seen other composite parts fail catastrophically (tennis racquets, hockey sticks,
    > golf club shafts) I wonder if bars would do the same thing. Perhaps Kraig Willet has some bar
    > failure tests online that I could check out.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Scott..
     
  10. Ant

    Ant Guest

    "S. Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > In all seriousness, has anyone ever crushed or damaged a carbon handlebar?? I've only seen a few
    > come my way but...

    <snipped>

    > most of the carbon bars I've seen seem positively robust!

    hear hear. I kept seeing mtb custom builds using the new carbon bars, and i would wince away
    quietly. however, in the last couple months, we've had a few bits of carbon tube to play with, cut
    off the ends of handlebars or bottoms of seatposts. man, they are tough to break. hitting them with
    a hammer does little. the hammer generally bounces off, or sends the tube flying. the only way we've
    been consistently able to destroy them is with a vice. pretty confidence inspiring, frankly.

    we have one dedicated and vocal retro grouch mechanic, and it was a joy to see him try to destroy a
    bit of carbon seatpost one day, after a short (and loud) diatribe about its shortcomings and how
    delicate carbon is. obviously, the engineering is everything, but this particular seatpost held up
    for two or three hilarious minutes of jumping and hammering before he resorted to the 8" vice.
     
  11. Eric St. Mary

    Eric St. Mary New Member

    Joined:
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    Score it with a razor blade and then use a good quality high tooth per inch count hacksaw blade. Carbon is much stronger than you would ever believe, as long as you don't crush it with a vise.

    Eric
     
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