Cycle Component Upgrade - Opinions

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Dan Chatten, Feb 12, 2004.

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  1. Dan Chatten

    Dan Chatten Guest

    Hi,

    Last spring I purchased my first bike - an 03 Specialized Sequoia Sport
    http://www.specialized.com/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=6001&JServSessionIdroot=qb6i6lxaow.j27005 It is a
    terrific first bike, and I cycled over 2K road miles for the year. My goal for 04 is 3K+.

    I just wanted to solicit some advise from the cycling veterans on possible improvements that I can
    make to the components. Are there incremental changes that would really make a difference? I'm from
    Central MASS, so you live and die by the hills. :)

    I included the link to the 04 version of the Sequoia above, and the components have not changed from
    03-04. I did change the tires in 03 from 26's to 23's, but other then that the bike is as delivered.

    Right now, I'm cranking out the miles on the CYCLEOPS Fluid Trainer, and looking forward to spring.

    Thanks for any advise in advance.

    Regards, Dan
     
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  2. Bfd

    Bfd Guest

    "Dan Chatten" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Last spring I purchased my first bike - an 03 Specialized Sequoia Sport
    http://www.specialized.com/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=6001&JServSessionIdroot=qb6i6 lxaow.j27005
    > It is a terrific first bike, and I cycled over 2K road miles for the year. My goal for 04 is 3K+.
    >
    > I just wanted to solicit some advise from the cycling veterans on possible improvements that I can
    > make to the components. Are there incremental changes that would really make a difference? I'm
    > from Central MASS, so you live and die by the hills. :)
    >
    Looks like a decent bike for $800. If your bike fits, which it sounds like it does, the best way to
    improve is to ride. More miles and hills will improve your performance.

    > I included the link to the 04 version of the Sequoia above, and the components have not changed
    > from 03-04. I did change the tires in 03 from 26's to 23's, but other then that the bike is as
    > delivered.
    >
    Why did you change for 700x26 to 23s? I actually went the opposite direction and got some Avocet
    Fasgrip 700x25, I really like it...
     
  3. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 12 Feb 2004 15:29:09 -0800, [email protected] (Dan Chatten)
    wrote:
    >I just wanted to solicit some advise from the cycling veterans on possible improvements that I can
    >make to the components. Are there incremental changes that would really make a difference? I'm from
    >Central MASS, so you live and die by the hills. :

    Clipless pedals. Replace anything whose performance, after proper adjustment, is unsatisfactory. The
    STI levers might feel better in a tiagra or higher, with shifting in both directions from the
    levers, rather than the thumbshifter.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  4. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 12 Feb 2004 15:29:09 -0800, [email protected] (Dan Chatten) may
    have said:

    >I just wanted to solicit some advise from the cycling veterans on possible improvements that I can
    >make to the components. Are there incremental changes that would really make a difference? I'm from
    >Central MASS, so you live and die by the hills. :)

    If it's not broke, don't fix it...

    Seriously, it sounds like you're happy with the current setup and have been getting good results
    from it. Unless there's something that's not meeting expectations, it's not likely that you'll
    realize significant gains from low- or moderate-cost mods that you could make. It's not like you
    started with a bottom-of-the-barrel Walgoose; that's a decent unit you have, and the improvements
    beyond what it already has will be fairly minor.

    Aside from minor convenience things or perhaps a saddle swap if it's not quite right, I'd say that
    the best plan would be to ride it through the spring and into the summer, and then see if there's
    anything that would make sense to change, like perhaps a little wider range of cassette if the hills
    have been getting you down excessively. Frankly, if that bike was parked on my patio..well, it
    wouldn't be, because I'd probably be *on* it.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Yes, I have a killfile. If I don't respond to something,
    it's also possible that I'm busy.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  5. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On 12 Feb 2004 15:29:09 -0800, [email protected] (Dan Chatten)
    wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >Last spring I purchased my first bike - an 03 Specialized Sequoia Sport
    >http://www.specialized.com/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=6001&JServSessionIdroot=qb6i6lxaow.j27005 It is a
    >terrific first bike, and I cycled over 2K road miles for the year. My goal for 04 is 3K+.
    >
    >I just wanted to solicit some advise from the cycling veterans on possible improvements that I can
    >make to the components. Are there incremental changes that would really make a difference? I'm from
    >Central MASS, so you live and die by the hills. :)
    >
    >I included the link to the 04 version of the Sequoia above, and the components have not changed
    >from 03-04. I did change the tires in 03 from 26's to 23's, but other then that the bike is as
    >delivered.
    >
    >Right now, I'm cranking out the miles on the CYCLEOPS Fluid Trainer, and looking forward to spring.
    >
    >Thanks for any advise in advance.
    >
    >Regards, Dan

    When something breaks, upgrade it. Until then, the gains from any equipment changes are so small
    that it isn't worth it. For your first bike, you made a nice choice. I'd ride the bike as much as
    possible this coming year and see what happens. If the hills are hard, you can go to a wider
    cassette, or smaller chainwheel.

    As the year goes along, think about getting someone to look at your fit. As you cycle more, your
    posture and needs can change. Stem changes should handle anything in the coming year.

    Save your money for now- component upgrades are a loser compared to new bikes, and truthfully, you
    are probably going to be getting a new bike in the next couple of years. Not because there is
    anything wrong with the one you have. Just because you may settle into styles of riding where a new
    bike is the cheapest way to get what you want. At which point you put a rack and fenders on this one
    and you have a nice commuter bike.
     
  6. Dan Chatten

    Dan Chatten Guest

    Yup, I should have mentioned that I switched to the clipless peddles about 2 months into riding. I
    only wish that I had done it sooner. The funny part is that I made it through the outdoor season
    without a spill, and then the second time I jumped on my trainer in my basement, I clipped in, and
    .... down I went.
     
  7. Dan Chatten

    Dan Chatten Guest

    It was more driven on the advise of some of my riding pals. And it was mixed indeed. From, "Don't
    bother" to "Yes, it will make a huge difference". I will admit that I did feel some difference in
    terms of performance, but in the grand scheme of things it was negligible.

    One interesting tid-bit was about half the season I used the 26's, and the other half the 23's. I
    had only a single blowout with the 26's, but I had 4+ with the 23's. In all fairness though, I think
    that my tire pressure was too high with the 23's, resulting in the pinch flats. When I brought the
    pressure down to it's min vs. max pressure, the final month and a half of riding was fine.

    I am considering going back to my 26's, given the wonderful road conditions around these parts -
    most especially in the spring. Ah, spring !

    Dan
     
  8. Dan Chatten

    Dan Chatten Guest

    Thanks for the input ! You confirmed what I probably already knew, but hell... why not ask the same
    question yet again, right ?

    Speaking of fit, et al. I have found that using the trainer this winter has made a huge difference.
    I moved the seat post up and adjusted the seat for starters. It already feels 100% better.

    And I have already decided that after three full years of riding, I'll purchase a new bike. Well, I
    should add that the wife has added her approval ;) ... I'm hoping that my oldest son will consider
    cycling, and I'll pass on my current bike to him, and/or use it during my commutes to work since the
    roads to and from are "fair" at best.

    Regards, Dan

    Dan Daniel <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 12 Feb 2004 15:29:09 -0800, [email protected] (Dan Chatten) wrote:
    >
    > >Hi,
    > >
    > >Last spring I purchased my first bike - an 03 Specialized Sequoia Sport
    > >http://www.specialized.com/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=6001&JServSessionIdroot=qb6i6lxaow.j27005 It is a
    > >terrific first bike, and I cycled over 2K road miles for the year. My goal for 04 is 3K+.
    > >
    > >I just wanted to solicit some advise from the cycling veterans on possible improvements that I
    > >can make to the components. Are there incremental changes that would really make a difference?
    > >I'm from Central MASS, so you live and die by the hills. :)
    > >
    > >I included the link to the 04 version of the Sequoia above, and the components have not changed
    > >from 03-04. I did change the tires in 03 from 26's to 23's, but other then that the bike is as
    > >delivered.
    > >
    > >Right now, I'm cranking out the miles on the CYCLEOPS Fluid Trainer, and looking forward to
    > >spring.
    > >
    > >Thanks for any advise in advance.
    > >
    > >Regards, Dan
    >
    > When something breaks, upgrade it. Until then, the gains from any equipment changes are so small
    > that it isn't worth it. For your first bike, you made a nice choice. I'd ride the bike as much as
    > possible this coming year and see what happens. If the hills are hard, you can go to a wider
    > cassette, or smaller chainwheel.
    >
    > As the year goes along, think about getting someone to look at your fit. As you cycle more, your
    > posture and needs can change. Stem changes should handle anything in the coming year.
    >
    > Save your money for now- component upgrades are a loser compared to new bikes, and truthfully, you
    > are probably going to be getting a new bike in the next couple of years. Not because there is
    > anything wrong with the one you have. Just because you may settle into styles of riding where a
    > new bike is the cheapest way to get what you want. At which point you put a rack and fenders on
    > this one and you have a nice commuter bike.
     
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