Cycle computer advice sought



A

Artoi

Guest
Ok, the next stage of build up of accessories is the cycle computer. The
wired one from my old bike is dying with bad contacts and probably
should be put to rest.

Looking at all the new units, please help and give some pointers on the
specific models that you would recommend. I am looking for,
- Wireless
- Cadence capability
- Stem mounting if possible (bar is out of space)
- Smart enough to know a traffic/rest stop and not continue to count
toward the average speed.
- Data not erased at battery change.

I already have a general mapping GPS unit that I can mount on my bike,
but it's shared. It's nice to have a dedicated unit that can tell me the
cumulative mile of my bike.

Thanks for your input and suggestion. The possibility is too wide out
there and I'd like to hear some personal experience if possible. :)
--
 
D

Donga

Guest
Artoi wrote:
> Ok, the next stage of build up of accessories is the cycle computer. The
> wired one from my old bike is dying with bad contacts and probably
> should be put to rest.


It sounds like you are dying to spend, but you could get more life out
of the old one with careful use of sandpaper and petroleum jelly on the
contacts.

Donga
 
A

Artoi

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Donga" <[email protected]> wrote:

> Artoi wrote:
> > Ok, the next stage of build up of accessories is the cycle computer. The
> > wired one from my old bike is dying with bad contacts and probably
> > should be put to rest.

>
> It sounds like you are dying to spend, but you could get more life out
> of the old one with careful use of sandpaper and petroleum jelly on the
> contacts.


Yes, I am prepared to spend a bit. After all, it's my one time upgrade
of cycling gear in the last 13+ years. And I suspect this time round the
investment will need to last for a while again. Yes, I could buff up
that old unit but it doesn't have those nice features like cadence etc
and be able to teach me to cycle the right way. I need to take more care
of how I cycle given the extra years in the body. Further, it's a pain
to retrieve some of the components like wiring from the old bike. It's
all a bit stuck along with some rust. So I figured I'll just bit the
bullet and get a wireless unit that'll last. Make sense?

Yes, yes, I do have a bend for gadgets. But if it'll keep me on the bike
longer, then it's worth it. :)
--
 
D

Donga

Guest
Artoi wrote:
> Yes, yes, I do have a bend for gadgets. But if it'll keep me on the bike
> longer, then it's worth it. :)


I can relate to that!

Donga
 
F

Friday

Guest
Donga wrote:
> Artoi wrote:
>
>>Ok, the next stage of build up of accessories is the cycle computer. The
>>wired one from my old bike is dying with bad contacts and probably
>>should be put to rest.

>
>
> It sounds like you are dying to spend, but you could get more life out
> of the old one with careful use of sandpaper and petroleum jelly on the
> contacts.
>
> Donga
>


Once the plating has been worn through and you're down to steel the
problem will only get worse whatever you do. Sandpaper only rubs of more
of the plating and exposes more steel, the problem will soon re-occur.
Ideally you want silver contacts, since the silver oxide, whilst dark in
color, is still conductive.

Friday
 
J

jim beam

Guest
Friday wrote:
> Donga wrote:
>> Artoi wrote:
>>
>>> Ok, the next stage of build up of accessories is the cycle computer. The
>>> wired one from my old bike is dying with bad contacts and probably
>>> should be put to rest.

>>
>>
>> It sounds like you are dying to spend, but you could get more life out
>> of the old one with careful use of sandpaper and petroleum jelly on the
>> contacts.
>>
>> Donga
>>

>
> Once the plating has been worn through and you're down to steel the
> problem will only get worse whatever you do. Sandpaper only rubs of more
> of the plating and exposes more steel, the problem will soon re-occur.
> Ideally you want silver contacts, since the silver oxide, whilst dark in
> color, is still conductive.
>
> Friday


you're right about the effect of abrasion, but forget silver plating in
this kind of application - it's just not worth it and is not corrosion
resistant enough to last. stick with a dab of silicone dielectric
grease - it's highly effective, pretty much inert and doesn't [over
time] affect the plastics and seals of the computer or mounting, unlike
vaseline.
 
i use a Garmin Fortrex 101
easily mounted on handle bar with foam [i use pipe insulation]

no wires with GPS
also can be used for walking & running [but no heart-rate]

see Amazon for information & opinions
under 100 bucks on Ebay

waterboy
 
P

Patrick Lamb

Guest
On Sun, 10 Sep 2006 08:35:11 GMT, Artoi <[email protected]> wrote:
>In article <[email protected]>,
> "Donga" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> It sounds like you are dying to spend, but you could get more life out
>> of the old one with careful use of sandpaper and petroleum jelly on the
>> contacts.

>
>Yes, I am prepared to spend a bit. After all, it's my one time upgrade
>of cycling gear in the last 13+ years. And I suspect this time round the
>investment will need to last for a while again. Yes, I could buff up
>that old unit but it doesn't have those nice features like cadence etc
>and be able to teach me to cycle the right way. I need to take more care
>of how I cycle given the extra years in the body. Further, it's a pain
>to retrieve some of the components like wiring from the old bike. It's
>all a bit stuck along with some rust. So I figured I'll just bit the
>bullet and get a wireless unit that'll last. Make sense?


If you want the "standard + cadence" computer, the Cateye Astrale is
usually on sale from Performance/Nashbar. Decent unit, but you'll
want to use the petroleum jelly -- one of mine got corroded contacts
inside of six months (including at least one excessively sweaty ride).

Pat

Email address works as is.
 
A

Artoi

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] wrote:

> i use a Garmin Fortrex 101
> easily mounted on handle bar with foam [i use pipe insulation]
>
> no wires with GPS
> also can be used for walking & running [but no heart-rate]
>
> see Amazon for information & opinions
> under 100 bucks on Ebay


Thanks, I've thought about the Garmin solution (305) but it's expensive
and that I already have an eTrex Vista Cx that I use when I want mapping
and track recording.

I am presently thinking of putting on a more permanent cycling computer
that I won't take off.
--
 
A

Artoi

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Patrick Lamb <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Sun, 10 Sep 2006 08:35:11 GMT, Artoi <[email protected]> wrote:
> >In article <[email protected]>,
> > "Donga" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >> It sounds like you are dying to spend, but you could get more life out
> >> of the old one with careful use of sandpaper and petroleum jelly on the
> >> contacts.

> >
> >Yes, I am prepared to spend a bit. After all, it's my one time upgrade
> >of cycling gear in the last 13+ years. And I suspect this time round the
> >investment will need to last for a while again. Yes, I could buff up
> >that old unit but it doesn't have those nice features like cadence etc
> >and be able to teach me to cycle the right way. I need to take more care
> >of how I cycle given the extra years in the body. Further, it's a pain
> >to retrieve some of the components like wiring from the old bike. It's
> >all a bit stuck along with some rust. So I figured I'll just bit the
> >bullet and get a wireless unit that'll last. Make sense?

>
> If you want the "standard + cadence" computer, the Cateye Astrale is
> usually on sale from Performance/Nashbar. Decent unit, but you'll
> want to use the petroleum jelly -- one of mine got corroded contacts
> inside of six months (including at least one excessively sweaty ride).


Thanks for the suggestion. But I am looking for a wireless unit.

On a similar line, is there some fundamental difference b/n the various
manufacturers in terms of quality and functions? Comparing Cateye, VDO
and others.
--
 
D

Donga

Guest
Artoi wrote:
> Ok, the next stage of build up of accessories is the cycle computer. The
> wired one from my old bike is dying with bad contacts and probably
> should be put to rest.
>
> Looking at all the new units, please help and give some pointers on the
> specific models that you would recommend. I am looking for,
> - Wireless
> - Cadence capability
> - Stem mounting if possible (bar is out of space)
> - Smart enough to know a traffic/rest stop and not continue to count
> toward the average speed.
> - Data not erased at battery change.
>
> I already have a general mapping GPS unit that I can mount on my bike,
> but it's shared. It's nice to have a dedicated unit that can tell me the
> cumulative mile of my bike.
>
> Thanks for your input and suggestion. The possibility is too wide out
> there and I'd like to hear some personal experience if possible. :)
> --


New Blackburn unit reviewed in CyclingNews:
http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech/?id=2006/reviews/blackburn_delphi5

donga
 
A

Artoi

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Artoi <[email protected]> wrote:

> Ok, the next stage of build up of accessories is the cycle computer. The
> wired one from my old bike is dying with bad contacts and probably
> should be put to rest.
>
> Looking at all the new units, please help and give some pointers on the
> specific models that you would recommend. I am looking for,
> - Wireless
> - Cadence capability
> - Stem mounting if possible (bar is out of space)
> - Smart enough to know a traffic/rest stop and not continue to count
> toward the average speed.
> - Data not erased at battery change.
>
> I already have a general mapping GPS unit that I can mount on my bike,
> but it's shared. It's nice to have a dedicated unit that can tell me the
> cumulative mile of my bike.
>
> Thanks for your input and suggestion. The possibility is too wide out
> there and I'd like to hear some personal experience if possible. :)


Just to complete the circle, I'm here to report back on my final choice.

I picked up a VDO C4DS this morning from a LBS. It's a digital data
wireless unit that came with a speed sensor but cadence capable with the
additional purchase of a wireless cadence kit. The unit has so called 22
functions and can be cross used on two bikes as needed.

I looked around and checked out Cateye, Vella, Sigma Sport and Polar
before finding this VDO unit. The thing that caught my eye was VDO's
construction. It felt solid and the buttons have a very positive click
in feel. It is water resistant and only use one button battery in each
component (as opposed to some brands that requires two). Yes, VDO is
German and somewhere or somehow linked with Siemens.

The negatives are,
1) No back lighting.
2) Very few graphics in the display.

I've already fitted it and the mounting is decently solid with a small
clip on spoke magnet. The interface is easy to figure out once you've
explored it a bit. By mounting it on the left side right by my handlebar
grip, I can operate it with my left thumb easily enough.

Hope this helps anyone who might be in a similar search.
--