cycle computer life

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Papayahed1, May 18, 2003.

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  1. Papayahed1

    Papayahed1 Guest

    What can be done to extend the life of the contact points on your cycle computer? I find after a
    year or so, I can be riding along and all of a sudden I'm doing zero mph. It's worse in cooler
    weather (I assume because the metal contracts). Michael
     
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  2. Garyg

    Garyg Guest

    "Papayahed1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What can be done to extend the life of the contact points on your cycle computer? I find after a
    > year or so, I can be riding along and all of a
    sudden
    > I'm doing zero mph. It's worse in cooler weather (I assume because the
    metal
    > contracts). Michael

    I've used "dielectric grease", available at auto parts stores. It's used in car ignition systems.
    One tiny dab on each contact improved the functioning of my computer, which had the same problem as
    you describe.

    HTH, GG
     
  3. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    A dielectric is an insulator as are greases generally. The conspiracy of ignorance masquerades as
    common sense.

    "GaryG" <[email protected]_NOSPAMX_.net> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Papayahed1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > What can be done to extend the life of the contact points on your cycle computer? I find after a
    > > year or so, I can be riding along and all of a
    > sudden
    > > I'm doing zero mph. It's worse in cooler weather (I assume because the
    > metal
    > > contracts). Michael
    >
    > I've used "dielectric grease", available at auto parts stores. It's used
    in
    > car ignition systems. One tiny dab on each contact improved the
    functioning
    > of my computer, which had the same problem as you describe.
    >
    > HTH, GG
     
  4. Grl

    Grl Guest

    True, but it might serve to keep water out which can interfere with electrical contact (corrosion).
    Could be enough spring pressure available at the contacts to squeeze the insulating grease out. I
    had an outdoor irrigation system timer that came from the manufacturer with the battery contacts
    coated with what looked like silicone grease. I left the grease on (instructions said nothing about
    removing it), put batteries in and it worked fine. Still does years later.

    --

    - GRL

    "It's good to want things."

    Steve Barr (philosopher, poet, humorist, chemist, Visual Basic programmer)
    "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > A dielectric is an insulator as are greases generally. The conspiracy of ignorance masquerades as
    > common sense.
    >
    >
    > "GaryG" <[email protected]_NOSPAMX_.net> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > "Papayahed1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > What can be done to extend the life of the contact points on your
    cycle
    > > > computer? I find after a year or so, I can be riding along and all of
    a
    > > sudden
    > > > I'm doing zero mph. It's worse in cooler weather (I assume because
    the
    > > metal
    > > > contracts). Michael
    > >
    > > I've used "dielectric grease", available at auto parts stores. It's
    used
    > in
    > > car ignition systems. One tiny dab on each contact improved the
    > functioning
    > > of my computer, which had the same problem as you describe.
    > >
    > > HTH, GG
    > >
    > >
     
  5. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    Of what value is a statement that is so qualified as to be never wrong? (Consider the rhetorical
    application of the concept of 'falsifiability') Do you understand the difference between universal
    and existential quantifiers? The original poster noted the existence of a substance erroneously.

    Yes, there are proper applications of dielectric greases but improving (electrical) contact isn't
    one of them. That is the purpose of 'contact improvers' - Stabilant-22 comes to mind.

    Study the differences between statements that might begin 'There exists..." and "For all..."

    The conspiracy of ignorance masquerades as common sense....as I grasp another opportunity
    to be wrong.

    "GRL" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > True, but it might serve to keep water out which can interfere with electrical contact
    > (corrosion). Could be enough spring pressure available
    at
    > the contacts to squeeze the insulating grease out. I had an outdoor irrigation system timer that
    > came from the manufacturer with the battery contacts coated with what looked like silicone grease.
    > I left the grease
    on
    > (instructions said nothing about removing it), put batteries in and it worked fine. Still does
    > years later.
    >
    > --
    >
    > - GRL
    >
    > "It's good to want things."
    >
    > Steve Barr (philosopher, poet, humorist, chemist, Visual Basic programmer)
    > "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > A dielectric is an insulator as are greases generally. The conspiracy
    of
    > > ignorance masquerades as common sense.
    > >
    > >
    > > "GaryG" <[email protected]_NOSPAMX_.net> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > "Papayahed1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > What can be done to extend the life of the contact points on your
    > cycle
    > > > > computer? I find after a year or so, I can be riding along and all
    of
    > a
    > > > sudden
    > > > > I'm doing zero mph. It's worse in cooler weather (I assume because
    > the
    > > > metal
    > > > > contracts). Michael
    > > >
    > > > I've used "dielectric grease", available at auto parts stores. It's
    > used
    > > in
    > > > car ignition systems. One tiny dab on each contact improved the
    > > functioning
    > > > of my computer, which had the same problem as you describe.
    > > >
    > > > HTH, GG
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
     
  6. Garyg

    Garyg Guest

    "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]> top-posted the following non-answer in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > A dielectric is an insulator as are greases generally.

    I certainly don't claim to be an expert, but I did once use dielectric grease on my computer's balky
    contacts, and it did resolve the problem (cheaply). My LBS recommended I try it.

    Permatex Dielectric Grease is one common brand (http://www.permatex.com/news/00/pr001104b.asp). They
    claim that it "offers trouble-free operation and replacement while protecting electrical connections
    from moisture, salt, dirt and corrosion. It also increases performance and extends the service life
    of bulb sockets and prevents voltage leakage around electrical connections."

    > The conspiracy of ignorance masquerades as common sense.

    And is as common as spewage masquerading as intelligence, eh Doug?

    BTW, did you have any recommendations for the OP?

    GG

    >
    > "GaryG" <[email protected]_NOSPAMX_.net> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > "Papayahed1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > What can be done to extend the life of the contact points on your
    cycle
    > > > computer? I find after a year or so, I can be riding along and all of
    a
    > > sudden
    > > > I'm doing zero mph. It's worse in cooler weather (I assume because
    the
    > > metal
    > > > contracts). Michael
    > >
    > > I've used "dielectric grease", available at auto parts stores. It's
    used
    > in
    > > car ignition systems. One tiny dab on each contact improved the
    > functioning
    > > of my computer, which had the same problem as you describe.
    > >
    > > HTH, GG
    > >
    > >
     
  7. Richard

    Richard Guest

    On Sun, 18 May 2003 10:35:42 -0400, "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Of what value is a statement that is so qualified as to be never wrong? (Consider the rhetorical
    >application of the concept of 'falsifiability') Do you understand the difference between universal
    >and existential quantifiers? The original poster noted the existence of a substance erroneously.
    >
    >Yes, there are proper applications of dielectric greases but improving (electrical) contact isn't
    >one of them. That is the purpose of 'contact improvers' - Stabilant-22 comes to mind.
    >
    >Study the differences between statements that might begin 'There exists..." and "For all..."
    >
    >The conspiracy of ignorance masquerades as common sense....as I grasp another opportunity to
    >be wrong.
    >

    Gee, Doug.. are your shorts on too tight? Why the rant?
     
  8. Grl

    Grl Guest

    You know it's tempting (and easy) to reply to you in the same smart-ass tone you use, but what's
    the point?

    Cheers!

    - GRL

    "It's good to want things."

    Steve Barr (philosopher, poet, humorist, chemist, Visual Basic programmer)
    "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Of what value is a statement that is so qualified as to be never wrong? (Consider the rhetorical
    > application of the concept of 'falsifiability')
    Do
    > you understand the difference between universal and existential
    quantifiers?
    > The original poster noted the existence of a substance erroneously.
    >
    > Yes, there are proper applications of dielectric greases but improving (electrical) contact isn't
    > one of them. That is the purpose of 'contact improvers' - Stabilant-22 comes to mind.
    >
    > Study the differences between statements that might begin 'There
    exists..."
    > and "For all..."
    >
    > The conspiracy of ignorance masquerades as common sense....as I grasp another opportunity to
    > be wrong.
    >
    >
    > "GRL" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > True, but it might serve to keep water out which can interfere with electrical contact
    > > (corrosion). Could be enough spring pressure
    available
    > at
    > > the contacts to squeeze the insulating grease out. I had an outdoor irrigation system timer that
    > > came from the manufacturer with the battery contacts coated with what looked like silicone
    > > grease. I left the grease
    > on
    > > (instructions said nothing about removing it), put batteries in and it worked fine. Still does
    > > years later.
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > - GRL
    > >
    > > "It's good to want things."
    > >
    > > Steve Barr (philosopher, poet, humorist, chemist, Visual Basic programmer)
    > > "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > A dielectric is an insulator as are greases generally. The conspiracy
    > of
    > > > ignorance masquerades as common sense.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "GaryG" <[email protected]_NOSPAMX_.net> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > "Papayahed1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > > What can be done to extend the life of the contact points on your
    > > cycle
    > > > > > computer? I find after a year or so, I can be riding along and all
    > of
    > > a
    > > > > sudden
    > > > > > I'm doing zero mph. It's worse in cooler weather (I assume
    because
    > > the
    > > > > metal
    > > > > > contracts). Michael
    > > > >
    > > > > I've used "dielectric grease", available at auto parts stores. It's
    > > used
    > > > in
    > > > > car ignition systems. One tiny dab on each contact improved the
    > > > functioning
    > > > > of my computer, which had the same problem as you describe.
    > > > >
    > > > > HTH, GG
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
     
  9. GaryG wrote:

    > "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]> top-posted the following non-answer in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > A dielectric is an insulator as are greases generally.
    >
    > I certainly don't claim to be an expert, but I did once use dielectric grease on my computer's
    > balky contacts, and it did resolve the problem (cheaply). My LBS recommended I try it.
    >
    > Permatex Dielectric Grease is one common brand (http://www.permatex.com/news/00/pr001104b.asp).
    > They claim that it "offers trouble-free operation and replacement while protecting electrical
    > connections from moisture, salt, dirt and corrosion. It also increases performance and extends the
    > service life of bulb sockets and prevents voltage leakage around electrical connections."

    I've used dielectric grease on my cycle computer and the trailer connector to my truck. Both have
    worked very well. It keeps moisture from corroding the connections, yet the connection is firm
    enough not to be hindered by the grease coating.

    > > The conspiracy of ignorance masquerades as common sense.
    >
    > And is as common as spewage masquerading as intelligence, eh Doug?
    >
    > BTW, did you have any recommendations for the OP?

    He did mention something about knowing the difference between "universal and existential
    qualifiers".

    Maybe that will help the cyclecomputer run better.

    SMH
     
  10. Jim Spencer

    Jim Spencer Guest

    On 18 May 2003 12:16:33 GMT, [email protected] (Papayahed1) wrote:

    >What can be done to extend the life of the contact points on your cycle computer? I find after a
    >year or so, I can be riding along and all of a sudden I'm doing zero mph. It's worse in cooler
    >weather (I assume because the metal contracts). Michael

    A couple times a year clean the contacts with an electrical contact cleaner. I use Deox IT that
    comes in a pen form which is easier to use than those that come in a spray can. According to the
    label it cleans, deoxidizes, seals & protects electrical contacts. I assume it does all that becase
    since using it I haven't had any problems with my cycle computer which I have had for several years.
    I bought the DeoxIT from an online electrical supply place but I know Radio Shack carries contact
    cleaners but I don't know if they have it in the pen form.
     
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