Cycle computer recommendations (yet again)

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by D.M. Procida, Sep 5, 2005.

  1. On Thu, 8 Sep 2005 13:31:02 +0100, Call me Bob wrote
    (in article <[email protected]>):

    >[...]
    >
    > Give us an idea of what you think you might want it to do, and we can
    > probably recommend a few models for you to consider.


    Thanks very much, that's very kind. I thought I had it sussed when I found
    Sheldon's wonderful stuff, but then, filled with his trouble-shooting advice,
    I got hopelessly lost in the online catalogues. Wandering between different
    computers probably didn't help either.

    I want sometimes to understand how far I've gone on a Brompton or a 26" fat
    tyre bike and to be able to remove the unit when I go into a shop. None of
    the pics I saw gave any clue as to quick release facility.

    I did wonder if a wireless one left less nickable stuff one the bike - a blob
    on a spoke might attract less larcenous attention than interesting looking
    wire.

    I'd like to know if I can use the same unit for both bikes, or if I have to
    buy two. For example, extensive reprogramming that bears any resemblance to
    programming the video recorder would be a good reason for buying two.

    It'd be quite nice to know how fast I'm going, but its not essential, and I'd
    quite like to know how hot/cold it is.

    The Brompton is probably the one I need to deal with first, as its
    chicken-out capability is high enough to have encouraged me to venture
    further than if I'd been compelled to ride it back as well. I assume if I got
    a wire one, the wire would have to be long enough to tie to the front brake
    cable for folding, and I wonder if a wireless one has to have clear line of
    sight from its mounting to the widget on the front wheel?

    I've managed without understanding actual trip distance for years, but
    spousal enquiries lately aren't satisfied with "downstream a bit" when she's
    considering a joint jaunt.


    Matt
     


  2. Also sprach Matthew Nettle [email protected]:

    > Thanks very much, that's very kind. I thought I had it sussed when I
    > found Sheldon's wonderful stuff, but then, filled with his
    > trouble-shooting advice, I got hopelessly lost in the online
    > catalogues. Wandering between different computers probably didn't
    > help either.
    >
    > I want sometimes to understand how far I've gone on a Brompton or a
    > 26" fat tyre bike and to be able to remove the unit when I go into a
    > shop. None of the pics I saw gave any clue as to quick release
    > facility.
    >
    > I did wonder if a wireless one left less nickable stuff one the bike
    > - a blob on a spoke might attract less larcenous attention than
    > interesting looking wire.
    >
    > I'd like to know if I can use the same unit for both bikes, or if I
    > have to buy two. For example, extensive reprogramming that bears any
    > resemblance to programming the video recorder would be a good reason
    > for buying two.


    Many, though by no means all, allow one to enter two different wheel sizes
    and switch relatively easily between the two.

    > It'd be quite nice to know how fast I'm going, but its not essential,
    > and I'd quite like to know how hot/cold it is.


    I have a Trek Incite something-or-other on my mountain bike with a
    temperature wossname on it.

    --
    Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
    Although the hippopotamus hath no sting in its tail, the wise man would
    rather be seated upon the back of a bee.
     
  3. Tim Hall

    Tim Hall Guest

    On Thu, 8 Sep 2005 16:59:20 +0100, Matthew Nettle <[email protected]> wrote:

    <snip>
    >
    >I want sometimes to understand how far I've gone on a Brompton or a 26" fat
    >tyre bike and to be able to remove the unit when I go into a shop. None of
    >the pics I saw gave any clue as to quick release facility.
    >

    IME all have a quick release, leaving a small plastic bracket on the
    handlebars, magnet on wheel and sensor on fork.


    >I did wonder if a wireless one left less nickable stuff one the bike - a blob
    >on a spoke might attract less larcenous attention than interesting looking
    >wire.


    The wire is more or less invisible, FSVO invisible. I don't think
    being wireless or not will contribute to nickability.

    >
    >I'd like to know if I can use the same unit for both bikes, or if I have to
    >buy two. For example, extensive reprogramming that bears any resemblance to
    >programming the video recorder would be a good reason for buying two.


    My Cateye Mity 3 has two wheel settings. As I don't switch between
    wheel settings at all, I can't comment how easy this is. You'll need
    a second mounting bracket, magnet and sensor as these are more or less
    permanent.


    <snip>


    Tim
     
  4. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Matthew
    Nettle ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > On Thu, 8 Sep 2005 13:31:02 +0100, Call me Bob wrote
    > (in article <[email protected]>):
    >
    >>[...]
    >>
    >> Give us an idea of what you think you might want it to do, and we can
    >> probably recommend a few models for you to consider.

    >
    > Thanks very much, that's very kind. I thought I had it sussed when I
    > found Sheldon's wonderful stuff, but then, filled with his
    > trouble-shooting advice, I got hopelessly lost in the online
    > catalogues. Wandering between different computers probably didn't help
    > either.
    >
    > I want sometimes to understand how far I've gone on a Brompton or a 26"
    > fat tyre bike and to be able to remove the unit when I go into a shop.
    > None of the pics I saw gave any clue as to quick release facility.


    They pretty much all do quick release - I would guess only the very
    cheapest and nastiest don't.

    > I did wonder if a wireless one left less nickable stuff one the bike -
    > a blob on a spoke might attract less larcenous attention than
    > interesting looking wire.


    A particularly neat idea is the Mavic Win-Tech which has the transmitter
    inside an enlarged quick release skewer handle; but it isn't cheap
    (about £75).

    > I'd like to know if I can use the same unit for both bikes, or if I
    > have to buy two. For example, extensive reprogramming that bears any
    > resemblance to programming the video recorder would be a good reason
    > for buying two.


    You don't /have/ to buy two, because many can be set up to remember the
    wheel sizes for two (or more) bikes. But in practice, as you say, it's
    probably easier.

    > The Brompton is probably the one I need to deal with first, as its
    > chicken-out capability is high enough to have encouraged me to venture
    > further than if I'd been compelled to ride it back as well. I assume if
    > I got a wire one, the wire would have to be long enough to tie to the
    > front brake cable for folding,


    I find spiralling the computer wire around the brake cable is the
    simplest and neatest solution for wired types (although wireless is
    obviously neater).

    > and I wonder if a wireless one has to
    > have clear line of sight from its mounting to the widget on the front
    > wheel?


    Yes, pretty much.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; For in much wisdom is much grief; and he that increaseth
    ;; knowledge increaseth sorrow.." - Ecclesiastes 1:18
     
  5. Simon Brooke wrote:
    >in message <[email protected]>, Matthew
    >Nettle ('[email protected]ew.net') wrote:
    >
    >> I want sometimes to understand how far I've gone on a Brompton or a 26"
    >> fat tyre bike and to be able to remove the unit when I go into a shop.
    >> None of the pics I saw gave any clue as to quick release facility.

    >
    >They pretty much all do quick release - I would guess only the very
    >cheapest and nastiest don't.


    The Aldi special offer ones do. Can you get cheaper and nastier?
     
  6. Call me Bob

    Call me Bob Guest

    On Thu, 8 Sep 2005 16:59:20 +0100, Matthew Nettle <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I want sometimes to understand how far I've gone on a Brompton or a 26" fat
    >tyre bike and to be able to remove the unit when I go into a shop. None of
    >the pics I saw gave any clue as to quick release facility.
    >
    >I did wonder if a wireless one left less nickable stuff one the bike - a blob
    >on a spoke might attract less larcenous attention than interesting looking
    >wire.


    I don't think I've ever seen one which doesn't release from the bike,
    the main head unit that is, the sensor/wire fitting is always
    permanently fixed. They'll all quickly clip on and off the bike and
    into your pocket whenever necessary.

    >I'd like to know if I can use the same unit for both bikes, or if I have to
    >buy two. For example, extensive reprogramming that bears any resemblance to
    >programming the video recorder would be a good reason for buying two.


    Several computers will work with two differently wheeled bikes. Two
    I've used do, a Sigma 1600 and a Cateye Mity. You program two
    different wheel circumferences and then change the computer mode
    between bikes A and B as appropriate.

    I don't use the feature myself because I think it's a bit of a faff to
    switch the computer setting. Both of them require you to trigger a
    little button recessed into the back of the main unit, and you need
    something like a paperclip to get at it. It might be fine if perhaps
    you don't swap bikes all that often, but I think I'd forget and then
    not have anything pointy with me a mile down the road... YMMV.

    The other disadvantage is that you'll have to purchase a second
    fitting kit to install on the other bike, and they are generally a
    good half the price of a complete computer kit, so I'd rather spend
    the extra money and do without the juggling.

    >It'd be quite nice to know how fast I'm going, but its not essential, and I'd
    >quite like to know how hot/cold it is.


    They'll all tell you your current speed, I suppose there must be a
    couple with temperature reading, but it's not common so you'll have to
    hunt that down if it's really a must for you. It probably won't be a
    cheap model either.

    >The Brompton is probably the one I need to deal with first, as its
    >chicken-out capability is high enough to have encouraged me to venture
    >further than if I'd been compelled to ride it back as well. I assume if I got
    >a wire one, the wire would have to be long enough to tie to the front brake
    >cable for folding, and I wonder if a wireless one has to have clear line of
    >sight from its mounting to the widget on the front wheel?


    Yes, a common route to the front wheel is coiled around the front
    brake cable, generally the cables are plenty long enough for this.
    I've never played with a brompton so don't know if the folding action
    may have computer fitting implications. I'm sure some bromptoneers
    here in the group can advise on that.

    Wireless models don't necessarily need line of sight, but they do need
    to be within a certain distance of the front sensor, and some models
    seem more sensitive about this than others. Wireless computers are
    simpler to fit, as you don't have to route the wire, but this is a
    once only job anyway, and with care can be done very unobtrusively.

    A slight drawback with wireless computers is they will pick up
    interference from other, sometimes bizarre, sources. So riding past
    things like supermarket trolley control points can momentarily give
    you speed readings of 80mph :)

    I've also found they are a little bit more laggy then wired models,
    IME, and so changes in speed etc can take just that extra second or
    two to register. Not a big issue though, I suppose.

    >I've managed without understanding actual trip distance for years, but
    >spousal enquiries lately aren't satisfied with "downstream a bit" when she's
    >considering a joint jaunt.


    I like knowing how far a particular journey or favourite route is, and
    keeping tabs on weekly/monthly mileages is enjoyable for me too.


    I've used / still use a Cateye Mity, a Cateye Astrale and also a Sigma
    Sport BC 1600. They are all good computers and I'd happily recommend
    any of them. They're all wired models, with the Mity and BC 1600 doing
    basically the same stuff, the Astrale has the extra feature of
    displaying your pedal cadence. They cost about 20 - 30 quid.

    I don't think you can go far wrong with any of the Cateye or Sigma
    computers, they're both well established and well regarded and they
    both have more basic models for a bit less money too. I'm sure other
    brands do an equally fine job, but I only have experience of those.

    Have a look here at Wiggle and browse the different feature sets /
    prices:

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/CategoryProducts.aspx?Cat=cycle&w=0&CategoryName=Computers

    Wiggle aren't necessarily the cheapest place to buy, but they have a
    good selection and descriptions to help you choose.

    Shout up if you need more info or fitting help.


    "Bob"
    --


    Email address is spam trapped, to reply directly remove the beverage.
     
  7. POHB

    POHB Guest

    > I'd quite like to know how hot/cold it is.

    The only one I could find that was wireless and tells the temperature
    is a YPK. I got mine online from withingtoncycles.
     
  8. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Call me Bob wrote:
    > Several computers will work with two differently wheeled bikes. Two
    > I've used do, a Sigma 1600 and a Cateye Mity. You program two
    > different wheel circumferences and then change the computer mode
    > between bikes A and B as appropriate.
    >
    > I don't use the feature myself because I think it's a bit of a faff to
    > switch the computer setting. Both of them require you to trigger a
    > little button recessed into the back of the main unit, and you need
    > something like a paperclip to get at it. It might be fine if perhaps
    > you don't swap bikes all that often, but I think I'd forget and then
    > not have anything pointy with me a mile down the road... YMMV.


    There's another way with the Cateye Mity 3 (and I guess Mity 8): On Odo
    mode, press the Set and Mode buttons together for 3 seconds. Or catch a
    hedgehog down the road if you forget that.

    ~PB
     
  9. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Matthew Nettle wrote:
    > I'd very much appreciate it if someone could run through basic
    > functioning/measuring principles of the electronic gadgets for a
    > person who hasn't had anything to do with them since throwing away a
    > mechanical one because the click gave location away in post choir
    > practice bicycle tag games. I peer at shiny displays of the modern
    > ones, but my steam age understanding sees nothing but
    > techno-witchcraft.
    >
    > I think if I understood them, I might get one if it is the case that
    > they no longer click every time the wheel goes round.


    Cateye ones make an exquisite "tink" noise as the reed switch triggers but
    only choir boys with exceptional hearing will realise you are creeping up
    on them.

    > I hope one
    > might help me come to grips with metrication, so it'd be nice if it
    > did temperature as well.


    I would like temperature as well but computers that include that are very
    few and far between. Manufacturers please take note!

    ~PB
     
  10. Also sprach Pete Biggs
    <[email protected]>:

    > I would like temperature as well but computers that include that are
    > very few and far between. Manufacturers please take note!


    See above re Trek Incite. Mine does cadence as well, but on the down side
    one can't switch the cadence onto the big display like one can with an
    Astrale, and the wires appear to be impossible to separate for those of us
    with steeds whose wheels and cranks are scarcely within shouting distance of
    one another.

    --
    Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
    We had that Maurits C. Escher in to do some building work once. I
    haven't been able to leave the house since.
     
  11. Thank you, kind people, I am much enlightened.

    Matt
     
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