Cycle snobbery

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by FranklynMint, Jun 7, 2004.

  1. FranklynMint

    FranklynMint New Member

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    I have always cycled, but have only recently (12 months) taken up regular recreational cycling for health reasons (dodgy knee means I can't jog or play footy, and swimming lengths is tedious). I have a 35 quid mountain bike, bought 2nd hand because i am not well-paid, and couldn't afford to splash out.
    I usualy road-cycle, occasionally going off-road when the fancy takes me. I wear cheap but functional proper cycling gear. All mountain-bikers will give a cheery wave and hello, but I have noticed that people on road bikes will often totally ignore you as you pass in opposite directions in the middle of the countryside miles from anywhere. I don't understand it. I have no wish to harbour negative thoughts about other people, or spoil anyone's enjoyment of a wonderfully fulfilling and healthy pastime, but why would anyone want to ignore another cyclist, especially if there is nobody else around! I have started to grow a chip on my own shoulder, and now get enormous enjoyment from overtaking road-bikers in all the latest gear, on the latest, flashiest bikes, who are not as fast as me. Hur hur. Can anyone explain or help me get rid of the shoulder chip?
     
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  2. Richard Belcher

    Richard Belcher New Member

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    I think you get rude people in cars, rude people on bikes & rude people walking the streets. I always wave or say hello to everyone one a bike that I see, most reply, others don't. I wouldn't worry about it. Just keep waving & keep cycling. Life's too short to worry about people who don't have time for you - Just enjoy the salutations from the less rude road users :)
     
  3. Elyob

    Elyob Guest

    "FranklynMint" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > All mountain-bikers will give a cheery wave and hello, but
    > I have noticed that people on road bikes will often
    > totally ignore you as you pass in opposite directions in
    > the middle of the countryside miles from anywhere. I don't
    > understand it.

    Yup, definitely get that myself in Richmond Park. Roadies
    blocking cycle paths and showing little common sense or
    courtesy (not sure which).
     
  4. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 7/6/04 2:04 pm, in article [email protected],
    "FranklynMint" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > All mountain-bikers will give a cheery wave and hello,
    > but I have noticed that people on road bikes will often
    > totally ignore you as you pass in opposite directions in
    > the middle of the countryside miles from anywhere. I
    > don't understand it.

    The problem is that all those road bikers who COULD explain
    why they ignore you will just, well, ignore you so you won't
    get a helpful response.

    It's an us and them situation. When I am on the road
    bike the roadies say hello and the MTB'ers ignore me.
    And vice versa.

    ..d
     
  5. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    FranklynMint wrote:

    > Can anyone explain or help me get rid of the
    > shoulder chip?

    Don't take it personally. It's just people.
     
  6. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "FranklynMint" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have always cycled, but have only recently (12 months)
    > taken up regular recreational cycling for health reasons
    > (dodgy knee means I can't jog or play footy, and swimming
    > lengths is tedious). I have a 35 quid mountain bike,
    > bought 2nd hand because i am not well-paid, and couldn't
    > afford to splash out. I usualy road-cycle, occasionally
    > going off-road when the fancy takes me. I wear cheap but
    > functional proper cycling gear.

    I started off like you with a Makro MTB, which I ended up
    doing a 200 mile ride on, even with it's plastic pedals and
    with no cycling clothing. I had a lot of fun on that bike
    and found that roadies would say hello, but only in the
    middle of nowhere when you got the kudos from obviously
    being able to cycle fairly long rides.

    My next bike was a Raleigh hybrid and the same thing
    happened, no wave in the suburbs , but in the countryside
    yes. Now I've got a fairly decent Italian road bike and I've
    all the proper gear on (except I wear baggies over my lycra
    shorts) and every roadie I've met bar none has waved to me
    even in the suburbs. It's just one of those things.

    I don't think it's snobbery as such, it's just that you
    can't sat hello to *every* cyclist, so you tend to be
    more selective
    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W
    http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  7. FranklynMint wrote:
    > I have always cycled, but have only recently (12 months)
    > taken up regular recreational cycling for health reasons
    > (dodgy knee means I can't jog or play footy, and swimming
    > lengths is tedious). I have a 35 quid mountain bike,
    > bought 2nd hand because i am not well-paid, and couldn't
    > afford to splash out. I usualy road-cycle, occasionally
    > going off-road when the fancy takes me. I wear cheap but
    > functional proper cycling gear. All mountain-bikers will
    > give a cheery wave and hello, but I have noticed that
    > people on road bikes will often totally ignore you as you
    > pass in opposite directions in the middle of the
    > countryside miles from anywhere. I don't understand it. I
    > have no wish to harbour negative thoughts about other
    > people, or spoil anyone's enjoyment of a wonderfully
    > fulfilling and healthy pastime, but why would anyone want
    > to ignore another cyclist, especially if there is nobody
    > else around! I have started to grow a chip on my own
    > shoulder, and now get enormous enjoyment from overtaking
    > road-bikers in all the latest gear, on the latest,
    > flashiest bikes, who are not as fast as me. Hur hur. Can
    > anyone explain or help me get rid of the shoulder chip?

    Just ignore it.
     
  8. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    Simon Mason wrote:

    > (except I wear baggies over my lycra shorts)

    Pfft! Why?
     
  9. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Simonb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Simon Mason wrote:
    >
    > > (except I wear baggies over my lycra shorts)

    I have to descend from Mount Olympus now and again and mix
    with the common people and don't want to look a total prat
    (meat and two veg wise) walking around WH Smiths ;-)

    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W
    http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  10. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 13:04:52 GMT someone who may be FranklynMint
    <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >I have noticed that people on road bikes will often
    >totally ignore you as you pass in opposite directions in
    >the middle of the countryside miles from anywhere. I don't
    >understand it.

    Simply tell yourself that they are idiots and continue to
    be yourself.

    >now get enormous enjoyment from overtaking road-bikers in
    >all the latest gear, on the latest, flashiest bikes, who
    >are not as fast as me.

    I would continue to get enormous enjoyment.

    People are just human. Some will acknowledge you, others
    will not. That's life and in some cases has nothing to do
    with snobbery.

    I am told that one of the more amusing ways of passing other
    cyclists, especially those on "flash" road our mountain
    bikes, is while wearing a floral dress on a Brompton.

    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number
    F566DA0E I will always explain revoked keys, unless the UK
    government prevents me using the RIP Act 2000.
     
  11. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    David Hansen [email protected] opined the
    following...
    > I am told that one of the more amusing ways of passing
    > other cyclists, especially those on "flash" road our
    > mountain bikes, is while wearing a floral dress on a
    > Brompton.

    Passing a rider on an MTB who I had seen (and
    kindofnotreallyinformallyracedsortofthing!) this morning, I
    felt obliged to say "morning". I assumed correctly that his
    response would be to speed up, and when we arrived at the
    junction where we part company, he was about 2 secs behind
    me. There then followed a short conversation ("Do you mind
    if I go the other side of you, turning left here" "Not at
    all" <lights change> "See you round").

    Thoroughly entertaining.

    Jon
     
  12. "Simonb" <[email protected]>typed

    > Simon Mason wrote:

    > > (except I wear baggies over my lycra shorts)

    > Pfft! Why?

    So he can shop at Harrod's...

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  13. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    Simonb wrote:

    >> (except I wear baggies over my lycra shorts)
    > Pfft! Why?

    To go with his platform soles?[1]

    [1] Yes, that is a dire joke.

    --
    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after
    posting. http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    Victory is ours! Down with Eric the Half A Brain!
     
  14. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

  15. Adam H

    Adam H Guest

    FranklynMint wrote:
    > I have always cycled, but have only recently (12 months)
    > taken up regular recreational cycling for health reasons
    > (dodgy knee means I can't jog or play footy, and swimming
    > lengths is tedious). I have a 35 quid mountain bike,
    > bought 2nd hand because i am not well-paid, and couldn't
    > afford to splash out. I usualy road-cycle, occasionally
    > going off-road when the fancy takes me. I wear cheap but
    > functional proper cycling gear. All mountain-bikers will
    > give a cheery wave and hello, but I have noticed that
    > people on road bikes will often totally ignore you as you
    > pass in opposite directions in the middle of the
    > countryside miles from anywhere. I don't understand it. I
    > have no wish to harbour negative thoughts about other
    > people, or spoil anyone's enjoyment of a wonderfully
    > fulfilling and healthy pastime, but why would anyone want
    > to ignore another cyclist, especially if there is nobody
    > else around! I have started to grow a chip on my own
    > shoulder, and now get enormous enjoyment from overtaking
    > road-bikers in all the latest gear, on the latest,
    > flashiest bikes, who are not as fast as me. Hur hur. Can
    > anyone explain or help me get rid of the shoulder chip?
    >
    >

    I had a similar but different issue yesterday on the
    Ridgeway.

    15 miles from the car my rear tyre decided to start ripping
    along the sidewall. Cue multiple pit stops to attempt to
    repair the tire using puncture repair patches. (They only
    lasted a few miles). During these pit stops 6-10 people
    cycled past - all on mountain bikes. Not one of them said
    hello, or asked if we needed assistance.

    I'd have thought that even if someone appears to be dealing
    with their problems, that it was courteous to ask if they
    needed assistance. Or am I deluding myself?

    Adam
     
  16. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "David Hansen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 13:04:52 GMT someone who may be
    > FranklynMint <[email protected]> wrote this:-
    >
    > >I have noticed that people on road bikes will often
    > >totally ignore you as you pass in opposite directions in
    > >the middle of the countryside miles from anywhere. I
    > >don't understand it.
    >
    > Simply tell yourself that they are idiots and continue to
    > be yourself.

    You can be more generous. They might not expect to be
    greeted by a fellow cyclist. (Yesterday out on the road bike
    I waved at a pair of panniered tourists and one of them
    nearly fell off from surprise.) They might be training and
    deep into the pain zone after the first 80 km out.

    > >now get enormous enjoyment from overtaking road-bikers in
    > >all the latest gear, on the latest, flashiest bikes, who
    > >are not as fast as me.
    >
    > I would continue to get enormous enjoyment.

    Best is to be focused on your own improvement. The only
    flawless victory you can achieve is over yourself, over your
    own limitations.

    > People are just human. Some will acknowledge you, others
    > will not. That's life and in some cases has nothing to do
    > with snobbery.

    Some examples above. And snobbery or no, where is it written
    that someone has to acknowledge you? I believe it's the same
    place that it's written you shouldn't call "Well screw you
    then!" over your shoulder with a cheery smile.

    > I am told that one of the more amusing ways of passing
    > other cyclists, especially those on "flash" road our
    > mountain bikes, is while wearing a floral dress on a
    > Brompton.

    While out on my road bike I'm often passed by blokes on
    heavy mountain bikes. They typically pull out of a driveway
    as I come past, catch up to me puffing hard and swoop past
    laughing at having "defeated" me. They then collapse
    exhausted and turn off into the next sideroad. Since I'm
    pacing myself to do 100 km at a steady heartrate, and
    they've just blown out doing 500m, I wonder what they think
    their "victory" shows.

    Basically, even if you put your floral dress on, what does
    passing accomplish if you aren't in the same race?
    --
    Mark South: World Citizen, Net Denizen
     
  17. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    Adam H wrote:

    > I'd have thought that even if someone appears to be
    > dealing with their problems, that it was courteous to ask
    > if they needed assistance. Or am I deluding myself?

    It deep ends.

    If there is a lone cyclist I will almost always stop and
    ask. If it's a group, I don't usually bother (especially if
    they seem to be dealing with
    it). I have stopped and helped a group of two, one of whom
    had stripped a crank bolt.

    --
    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after
    posting. http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    Victory is ours! Down with Eric the Half A Brain!
     
  18. David Hansen <[email protected]>typed

    > I am told that one of the more amusing ways of passing
    > other cyclists, especially those on "flash" road our
    > mountain bikes, is while wearing a floral dress on a
    > Brompton.

    Been there, done that!

    (No T-shirt though)

    Floral dress on old clunker or shopper's quite
    effective too...

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  19. Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
    > Simonb wrote:
    >
    >>> (except I wear baggies over my lycra shorts) Pfft! Why?
    >
    > To go with his platform soles?[1]
    >
    > [1] Yes, that is a dire joke.

    It is, in fact, worse than one can possibly possibly
    imagine. Allow me to stab the perp with this six-blade
    knife...

    --

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  20. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    Dave Larrington wrote:

    >>>> (except I wear baggies over my lycra shorts) Pfft! Why?
    >> To go with his platform soles?[1]

    > It is, in fact, worse than one can possibly possibly
    > imagine. Allow me to stab the perp with this six-blade
    > knife...

    And I thought we were brothers-in-arms...

    --
    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after
    posting. http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    Victory is ours! Down with Eric the Half A Brain!
     
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