Cycle snobbery

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by FranklynMint, Jun 7, 2004.

  1. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    Helen Deborah Vecht wrote:

    > Floral dress on old clunker or shopper's quite
    > effective too...

    In my case it might attract the wrong kind of
    attention, thobut...

    --
    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after
    posting. http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    Victory is ours! Down with Eric the Half A Brain!
     


  2. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "FranklynMint" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I have noticed that people on road bikes will often
    > totally ignore you as you pass in opposite directions in
    > the middle of the countryside miles from anywhere. I don't
    > understand it.

    Fear not! I have a decent road bike and wear all the lycra
    gear, I find most other cyclists will acknowledge me but
    the few who don't are generally hard core roadies. But to
    be fair, you have to appreciate those types, as I do
    myself, ride all year in all weathers and during the winter
    we cyclists are few and far between outside of urban areas
    but come the fair weather come the fair weather cyclists
    and if you go on a 60 mile run you'll see a lot of them,
    why should really keen cyclists acknowledge those people
    doing a few miles on a sunny day who only have the bike in
    common? They may be clocking up 200 or more miles a week,
    not always for fun but as a means to an end, i.e.
    competitions. To me a lot of fair weather cyclists are
    people riding bikes once or twice a year as a novelty
    rather than people who cycle passionately as part of their
    life but I would always acknowledge them the same as I do
    walkers I encounter in the sticks.

    --
    Regards, Pete
     
  3. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Adam H" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > 15 miles from the car my rear tyre decided to start
    > ripping along the sidewall. Cue multiple pit stops to
    > attempt to repair the tire using puncture repair patches.
    > (They only lasted a few miles). During these pit stops 6-
    > 10 people cycled past - all on mountain bikes. Not one of
    > them said hello, or asked if we needed assistance.

    Nah, they're just ignorant shit-bags.

    When out in my car once I encountered a roadie with broken
    chain, I nipped home, got some kit and returned to him and
    we got him underway. He was extremely grateful and I had
    the pleasure of having helped him and the hope that in a
    similar position someone might bail me out. Independence
    is fine most the time but occasionally a bit of help
    doesn't go amiss.
    --
    Regards, Pete
     
  4. FranklynMint

    FranklynMint New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2004
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0
    >They may be clocking up 200 or more miles a week,
    >not always for fun but as a means to an end, i.e.
    >competitions.
    In the last year, I have usually clocked up 100+miles per week, in all weathers (I rode right through the winter, except when there was too much snow on the roads), with a means to an end (my health and enjoyment)....If I could spend the money on a more decent bike I would, but I don't see how one can tell another's distance ridden by assuming things from his/her attire or type of trusty steed....???
     
  5. FranklynMint wrote:

    > I have always cycled, but have only recently (12 months)
    > taken up regular recreational cycling for health reasons
    > (dodgy knee means I can't jog or play footy, and swimming
    > lengths is tedious). I have a 35 quid mountain bike,
    > bought 2nd hand because i am not well-paid, and couldn't
    > afford to splash out. I usualy road-cycle, occasionally
    > going off-road when the fancy takes me. I wear cheap but
    > functional proper cycling gear. All mountain-bikers will
    > give a cheery wave and hello, but I have noticed that
    > people on road bikes will often totally ignore you as you
    > pass in opposite directions in the middle of the
    > countryside miles from anywhere. I don't understand it. I
    > have no wish to harbour negative thoughts about other
    > people, or spoil anyone's enjoyment of a wonderfully
    > fulfilling and healthy pastime, but why would anyone want
    > to ignore another cyclist, especially if there is nobody
    > else around! I have started to grow a chip on my own
    > shoulder, and now get enormous enjoyment from overtaking
    > road-bikers in all the latest gear, on the latest,
    > flashiest bikes, who are not as fast as me. Hur hur. Can
    > anyone explain or help me get rid of the shoulder chip?

    If they're like me, they're just focused ;-)

    Seriously, I ride near 100% if I'm commuting and it's an
    effort to speak.
     
  6. Msa

    Msa Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > >I have noticed that people on road bikes will often
    > >totally ignore you as you pass in opposite directions in
    > >the middle of the countryside miles from anywhere. I
    > >don't understand it.
    >
    > Simply tell yourself that they are idiots and continue to
    > be yourself.
    >

    Just out of interest, why idiots?

    --
    Mark (MSA) This post is packaged by intellectual weight, not
    volume. Some settling of contents may have occurred during
    transmission
     
  7. Msa

    Msa Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > > I have noticed that people on road bikes will often
    > > totally ignore you as you pass in opposite directions in
    > > the middle of the countryside miles from anywhere. I
    > > don't understand it.
    >

    Guess I qualify as a 'hardcore roadie'! Ride 6 days per
    week, race 3 times per week during the season and clock up
    on average I guess, around 500k per week, 52 weeks per year.

    I wave to anyone if I see them...but only if I can. If I'm
    training at full steam, on the drops at 50kph, it's as much
    as I can do to nod my head. On the other side of the road,
    this probably looks like a blank.

    Oh, and I acknowledge runners too, that usually takes 'em
    by surprise!

    Personally I wouldn't worry about, life's too short. Just
    make sure you enjoy yourself.

    --
    Mark (MSA) This post is packaged by intellectual weight, not
    volume. Some settling of contents may have occurred during
    transmission
     
  8. Mseries

    Mseries Guest

    "FranklynMint" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have always cycled, but have only recently (12 months)
    > taken up regular recreational cycling for health reasons
    > (dodgy knee means I can't jog or play footy, and swimming
    > lengths is tedious). I have a 35 quid mountain bike,
    > bought 2nd hand because i am not well-paid, and couldn't
    > afford to splash out. I usualy road-cycle, occasionally
    > going off-road when the fancy takes me. I wear cheap but
    > functional proper cycling gear. All mountain-bikers will
    > give a cheery wave and hello, but I have noticed that
    > people on road bikes will often totally ignore you as you
    > pass in opposite directions in the middle of the
    > countryside miles from anywhere. I don't understand it. I
    > have no wish to harbour negative thoughts about other
    > people, or spoil anyone's enjoyment of a wonderfully
    > fulfilling and healthy pastime, but why would anyone want
    > to ignore another cyclist, especially if there is nobody
    > else around! I have started to grow a chip on my own
    > shoulder, and now get enormous enjoyment from overtaking
    > road-bikers in all the latest gear, on the latest,
    > flashiest bikes, who are not as fast as me. Hur hur. Can
    > anyone explain or help me get rid of the shoulder chip?

    Lighten up troll.

    There are all kinds of w***ers on bikes.
     
  9. Mike Gayler

    Mike Gayler Guest

    "Peter B" <[email protected]> writed in
    news:[email protected]:

    snip
    > To me a lot of fair weather cyclists are people riding
    > bikes once or twice a year as a novelty rather than people
    > who cycle passionately as part of their life but I would
    > always acknowledge them the same as I do walkers I
    > encounter in the sticks.
    >
    Agreed, but doesn't a cheery wave, or a 'hi' as you pass
    them not, perhaps help them to beleive that cycling may be a
    freindly way of getting about, and perhaps, or just maybe,
    encourage them to get out on their bikes just a little bit
    more, and if we keep doing then perhaps, or just maybe,
    they'll turn into 'ard core cyclists Mike - Leicester (who
    will wave to *almost* anyone on a bike!)
     
  10. "Mark South" <[email protected]>typed

    > Basically, even if you put your floral dress on, what does
    > passing accomplish if you aren't in the same race?

    A wolf whistle? ;-)

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  11. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    Jon Senior wrote:

    > kindofnotreallyinformallyracedsortofthing

    I have a similar situation with a chap on a very nice Trek
    road bike some mornings. On some mornings he hares past me,
    on others the opposite. One day, I'm going to put it
    straight and we'll have a sprint from the line!
     
  12. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Mon, 7 Jun 2004 15:41:29 +0100, Jon Senior
    <jon_AT_restlesslemon_DOTco_DOT_uk> wrote in message
    <[email protected]>:

    >Passing a rider on an MTB who I had seen (and
    >kindofnotreallyinformallyracedsortofthing!) this morning, I
    >felt obliged to say "morning"

    Oh yes, always do that. And on the one occasion on which I
    was passed by another cyclist during the last three years of
    cycle commuting[1], he did the same to me :)

    [1] on a long climb and I was on the 'bent. I caught him at
    the top, honest, guv.

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
  13. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "FranklynMint" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >They may be clocking up 200 or more miles a week, not
    > >always for fun but as a means to an end, i.e.
    > >competitions.
    > In the last year, I have usually clocked up 100+miles per
    > week, in all weathers (I rode right through the winter,
    > except when there was too much snow on the roads), with a
    > means to an end (my health and enjoyment)....If I could
    > spend the money on a more decent bike I would, but I don't
    > see how one can tell another's distance ridden by assuming
    > things from his/her attire or type of trusty steed....???

    Not the point I was trying to make which is that some people
    may be riding their bike very hard in training and not as a
    jolly and feel little in common with some other cyclists and
    perhaps might not even be enjoying the ride but feel
    compelled to do it nontheless. They aren't particularly
    interested in communicating with everyone they meet. I'm not
    excusing their ignorance but trying to look at the situation
    from their perspective. Nothing to do with distance. Like I
    said, the only thing you have in common is a bicycle. You
    are unlikely to acknowledge every person you meet in a
    supermarket but quite possibly would if walking the Pennine
    Way in January but probably wouldn't in a popular car park
    near the Pennine Way on a sunny Sunday afternoon in July....
    --
    Regards, Pete
     
  14. Terry D

    Terry D Guest

    FranklynMint wrote:

    >>They may be clocking up 200 or more miles a week, not
    >>always for fun but as a means to an end, i.e.
    >>competitions.
    >
    > In the last year, I have usually clocked up 100+miles per
    > week, in all weathers (I rode right through the winter,
    > except when there was too much snow on the roads), with a
    > means to an end (my health and enjoyment)....If I could
    > spend the money on a more decent bike I would, but I don't
    > see how one can tell another's distance ridden by assuming
    > things from his/her attire or type of trusty steed....???
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    >

    I don't think it matters what they are wearing / riding,
    I'll wave to any fellow cyclist as long as they're not
    cycling on the bl**dy pavement.

    Terry D.
     
  15. In news:BCEA2801.17089%[email protected], David
    Martin <[email protected]> sed
    > On 7/6/04 2:04 pm, in article
    > [email protected],
    > "FranklynMint" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> All mountain-bikers will give a cheery wave and hello,
    >> but I have noticed that people on road bikes will often
    >> totally ignore you as you pass in opposite directions in
    >> the middle of the countryside miles from anywhere. I
    >> don't understand it.
    >
    > The problem is that all those road bikers who COULD
    > explain why they ignore you will just, well, ignore you so
    > you won't get a helpful response.
    >
    > It's an us and them situation. When I am on the road
    > bike the roadies say hello and the MTB'ers ignore me.
    > And vice versa.
    >
    > ..d

    Try riding a hybrid. Nobody waves. Not true, axley. I find a
    fairly equal proportion of road & mountain bikers respond,
    whether I'm on my hybrid or my "proper drops". I don't have
    a mtb as I don't enjoy off-road much (or is that BECAUSE I
    don't have a mtb?). Forget about us & them, keep up your
    cheery waves, and gradually "they" will come round. However,
    the thought just occurred, peds don't wave to every other
    ped they encounter, motorists likewise (unless they drive
    2CVs). Why are we so keen to wave at total strangers?

    --
    Morton Burner

    Alternative Bunsen
     
  16. On 2004-06-07, Simon Mason <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I have to descend from Mount Olympus now and again and
    > mix with the common people and don't want to look a total
    > prat (meat and two veg wise) walking around WH Smiths ;-)

    But surely thats what the padding in the shorts is for ;-)

    - Richard

    --
    _/_/_/ _/_/_/ _/_/_/ Richard dot Corfield at ntlworld dot
    com _/ _/ _/ _/ _/_/ _/ _/ Time is a one way street, _/
    _/ _/_/ _/_/_/ Except in the Twilight Zone.
     
  17. Mark McN

    Mark McN Guest

    Reply to Simon Mason
    > I don't think it's snobbery as such, it's just that you
    > can't sat hello to *every* cyclist, so you tend to be more
    > selective
    >

    With me, I think it's all down to numbers. Most days I see
    only one or two cyclists at most on my short commute; I wave
    or nod, and generally get it returned. Yesterday, it seemed
    like every roadie was going through town, in ones and twos,
    and several separate peletons. If I'd been on the bike at
    the time, it would have been like the saluting traps Spike
    Milligan used to set for officers.

    --
    Mark, UK. We hope to hear him swear, we love to hear him
    squeak, We like to see him biting fingers in his horny beak.
     
  18. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "Helen Deborah Vecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Mark South" <[email protected]>typed
    >
    >
    > > Basically, even if you put your floral dress on, what
    > > does passing accomplish if you aren't in the same race?
    >
    > A wolf whistle? ;-)

    I'm tempted to challenge you to produce MP3s or retract, but
    I'm not ready for the next ton of bricks yet....
    --
    "I would recommend Iowa or North Dakota for your dip
    into reality."
    - Ed Dolan in alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
     
  19. FranklynMint

    FranklynMint New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2004
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0
    >Like I said, the only thing you have in common is a bicycle. You
    >are unlikely to acknowledge every person you meet in a
    >supermarket but quite possibly would if walking the Pennine
    >Way in January

    Fair point. Hadn't thought of it like that. I wondered why people in Safeways stared when I waved at them down the toiletries aisle ;-)
    Perhaps I'll just continue on my cheery waving way, and keep in mind that not everybody's on the same trip.
    Regards
     
  20. Alex Ferrier

    Alex Ferrier Guest

    David Hansen wrote:
    >
    > FranklynMint wrote this:-
    >
    > >I have noticed that people on road bikes will often
    > >totally ignore you as you pass in opposite directions in
    > >the middle of the countryside miles from anywhere. I
    > >don't understand it.
    >
    > Simply tell yourself that they are idiots and continue to
    > be yourself.
    >

    Or just acknowledge that peoples goals are often quite
    divergent. Especially when they choose to signal this by
    using different types of bike. I quite regularly go out on
    my MTB and will usually wave or say hello to just about
    anyone willing to aknowledge me. However when I'm out and
    about on the road bike, it's usually a different matter. I'm
    usually working so bloody hard that it's all dribble, sweat
    and snot that I seem to be able get out of my face, saying
    'hello' gets in the way of my next *vital* gulp of air.
    Perhaps I should just get much fitter and be able to
    serenely glide along, chatting and shooting the breeze with
    all and sundry. However until then, please forgive me for my
    apparent lack of manners, I'm only human, y'know. ;-)

    --
    Alex BMW R1150GS DIAABTCOD#3 MSWF#4 UKRMFBC#6 Ibw#35 BOB#8
    http://www.team-ukrm.co.uk Windy's "little soldier"
     
Loading...
Loading...