cycleheaven ?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Iarocu, Jun 25, 2003.

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  1. Iarocu

    Iarocu Guest

    Hi all I visited Brugge recently. Bikes outnumbered all other traffic. People of all ages were using
    them for everyday journeys. Hundreds of bikes were parked at the local train station. Real
    sustainable transport as opposed to rural recreational routes. cheers Iain C
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Hi all I visited Brugge recently. Bikes outnumbered all other traffic. People of all ages were
    > using them for everyday journeys. Hundreds of bikes were parked at the local train station. Real
    > sustainable transport as opposed to rural recreational routes.

    cycle heaven? maybe.

    beer heaven? definitely.

    Hic,

    Colin
     
  3. John B

    John B Guest

    Colin Blackburn wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > Hi all I visited Brugge recently. Bikes outnumbered all other traffic. People of all ages were
    > > using them for everyday journeys. Hundreds of bikes were parked at the local train station. Real
    > > sustainable transport as opposed to rural recreational routes.
    >
    > cycle heaven? maybe.
    >
    > beer heaven? definitely.
    >
    > Hic,

    We go over and rent a house most Christmas/New Year periods when they have the ice rink in the
    square, plus we make various other visits during the year.

    Superb ales and bars and the drinking is so civilised. t'Brugs Beertje must be one of the world's
    classic bars and many an enjoyable evening has been spent supping there, dipping cheese chunks in
    mustard or celery salt.

    But back to bikes. In Bruges bikes are everywhere - all sit up and beg heavy duty roadsters,
    although last year I did see one bent bouncing over the cobbles.

    One 'interesting' observation is that on many of the centre's streets, the one-way system doesn't
    apply to cyclists.

    John B
     
  4. "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > One 'interesting' observation is that on many of the centre's streets, the one-way system doesn't
    > apply to cyclists.
    >

    Just out of interest, is this a contra-flow cycleway arrangement or lycra-loutish-ness?
     
  5. John B

    John B Guest

    Nathaniel Porter wrote:

    > "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > One 'interesting' observation is that on many of the centre's streets, the one-way system
    > > doesn't apply to cyclists.
    > >
    >
    > Just out of interest, is this a contra-flow cycleway arrangement or lycra-loutish-ness?

    It is legally permitted on many of the streets within the historic centre. I think it also applies
    to small mopeds.

    It helps that the general traffic speed is usually at walking pace and I don't recall ever seeing
    any "loutish-ness". The use of cycles is very utilitarian and very sedate. Bikes are everywhere.

    John B
     
  6. "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Nathaniel Porter wrote:
    >
    > > "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > One 'interesting' observation is that on many of the centre's streets,
    the
    > > > one-way system doesn't apply to cyclists.
    > > >
    > >
    > > Just out of interest, is this a contra-flow cycleway arrangement or lycra-loutish-ness?
    >
    > It is legally permitted on many of the streets within the historic centre. I think it also applies
    > to small mopeds.
    >

    So how does that work? Is there a separate lane for cyclists, or do they just have to take
    their chances?

    > It helps that the general traffic speed is usually at walking pace and I
    don't
    > recall ever seeing any "loutish-ness". The use of cycles is very utilitarian and very sedate.
    > Bikes are everywhere.
    >

    Probably because the Dutch have got so very few people are frustrated trying to get from A to B :)
     
  7. Johnny Klunk

    Johnny Klunk Guest

    > I visited Brugge recently. Bikes outnumbered all other traffic. People of all ages were
    > using them for everyday journeys. Hundreds of bikes were parked at the local train station.
    > Real sustainable transport as opposed to rural recreational routes.

    And a lovely city to boot. Wonder the attraction of London sometimes.
     
  8. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > cycle heaven? maybe.
    >
    > beer heaven? definitely.
    >

    Chocolate heaven? Certainly.

    (My wife's bad influence I'm afraid ;-)

    Have (piggish) fun!

    Graeme
     
  9. On Wed, 25 Jun 2003 17:37:24 +0000 (UTC), "Johnny Klunk"
    <[email protected]:rem0ve-this:johnnyklunk.com> wrote:

    >> I visited Brugge recently. Bikes outnumbered all other traffic. People of all ages were
    >> using them for everyday journeys. Hundreds of bikes were parked at the local train station.
    >> Real sustainable transport as opposed to rural recreational routes.
    >
    >And a lovely city to boot. Wonder the attraction of London sometimes.

    Brugge is a delight to wander through in a state of alcoholic blur. Lots of good bars, selling great
    beer, narrow alleyways leading into squares, superb architecture,chocolate, waffles, seafood...

    Gotta go back. Soon. :)
    --
    DG

    Bah!
     
  10. Johnny Klunk

    Johnny Klunk Guest

    > Brugge is a delight to wander through in a state of alcoholic blur. Lots of good bars, selling
    > great beer, narrow alleyways leading into squares, superb architecture,chocolate, waffles,
    > seafood...

    I hear ya. Always had a dream to cycle London > Holland > Belgium > France
    > London.
    I'd happily bus/train/skip all the english, and most of the french bits, for more time tulip-side.
     
  11. Andyk

    Andyk Guest

    "iarocu" wrote ...
    > Hi all I visited Brugge recently. Bikes outnumbered all other traffic. People of all ages were
    > using them for everyday journeys. Hundreds of bikes were parked at the local train station. Real
    > sustainable transport as opposed to rural recreational routes. cheers Iain C

    Sure, but what about the HILLS?
     
  12. [email protected] schreef ...

    > Probably because the Dutch have got so very few people are frustrated trying to get from A
    > to B :)

    Ahem...... Bruges is in Belgium. Just thought I'd mention this for the geographically
    handicapped ;-)

    --
    Regards, Marten
    - Dutch -
     
  13. "Marten Hoffmann" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] schreef ...
    >
    > > Probably because the Dutch have got so very few people are frustrated
    trying
    > > to get from A to B :)
    >
    > Ahem...... Bruges is in Belgium. Just thought I'd mention this for the geographically
    > handicapped ;-)
    >

    Bollocks :)
     
  14. On Wed, 25 Jun 2003 19:14:53 +0000 (UTC), "Johnny Klunk"
    <[email protected]:rem0ve-this:johnnyklunk.com> wrote:

    >
    >> Brugge is a delight to wander through in a state of alcoholic blur. Lots of good bars, selling
    >> great beer, narrow alleyways leading into squares, superb architecture,chocolate, waffles,
    >> seafood...
    >
    >I hear ya. Always had a dream to cycle London > Holland > Belgium > France
    >> London.
    >I'd happily bus/train/skip all the english, and most of the french bits, for more time tulip-side.

    London>Harwich>Hook of Holland>Brugge>Calais>Dover>London looks like
    quite an interesting route. Or you could take the train back in Brugge and avoid the French bit.
    Doesn't look too far, either. Take a week or two with plenty of waffle/beer breaks.
    --
    DG

    Bah!
     
  15. Seamus

    Seamus New Member

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    I like the path that goes around the city alongside the canal and the one out to Damme.

    Hate the cobbles though.
     
  16. John B

    John B Guest

    AndyK wrote:

    > "iarocu" wrote ...
    > > Hi all I visited Brugge recently. Bikes outnumbered all other traffic. People of all ages were
    > > using them for everyday journeys. Hundreds of bikes were parked at the local train station. Real
    > > sustainable transport as opposed to rural recreational routes. cheers Iain C
    >
    > Sure, but what about the HILLS?

    err... where?

    John B
     
  17. John B

    John B Guest

    Nathaniel Porter wrote:

    > "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Nathaniel Porter wrote:
    > >
    > > > "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > >
    > > > > One 'interesting' observation is that on many of the centre's streets,
    > the
    > > > > one-way system doesn't apply to cyclists.
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > Just out of interest, is this a contra-flow cycleway arrangement or lycra-loutish-ness?
    > >
    > > It is legally permitted on many of the streets within the historic centre. I think it also
    > > applies to small mopeds.
    > >
    >
    > So how does that work? Is there a separate lane for cyclists, or do they just have to take their
    > chances?

    No separate lane and yes, in a way it is 'taking their chances', but the roads are very narrow and
    the traffic speeds extremely low. I wouldn't be surprised if the average motor vehicle speed is
    below walking pace.

    I think it works because the drivers expect to see cyclists and all traffic seems to work together
    and respect each other's needs. Perhaps this is a culture-type thing.

    John B
     
  18. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > AndyK wrote:
    >
    > > "iarocu" wrote ...
    > > > Hi all I visited Brugge recently. Bikes outnumbered all other traffic. People of all ages were
    > > > using them for everyday journeys. Hundreds of bikes were parked at the local train station.
    > > > Real sustainable transport as opposed to rural recreational routes. cheers Iain C
    > >
    > > Sure, but what about the HILLS?
    >
    > err... where?

    zigactly

    cheers, clive
     
  19. Nathaniel Porter wrote:

    > Probably because the Dutch have got so very few people are frustrated trying to get from A
    > to B :)

    Bad news. Dutch motorways are frequently as crowded as British ones, plus they don't seem to believe
    in the concept of leaving space to the vehicle in front.

    More bad news: Belgium is worse. They only leave a one foot gap rather than two, and drive faster. I
    usually try to drive through Belgium at night.

    Good news. A couple of years ago we rode from Ostend to Ghent via Bruges. Mostly along a canalside
    cycleway thing. Flat. Smooth. Tailwind. Mmmmm, great. Dave Larrington -
    http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  20. Ooze

    Ooze Guest

    "Johnny Klunk" <[email protected]:rem0ve-this:johnnyklunk.com> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Brugge is a delight to wander through in a state of alcoholic blur. Lots of good bars, selling
    > > great beer, narrow alleyways leading into squares, superb architecture,chocolate, waffles,
    > > seafood...
    >
    > I hear ya. Always had a dream to cycle London > Holland > Belgium > France
    > > London.
    > I'd happily bus/train/skip all the english, and most of the french bits, for more time tulip-side.

    tulip = dutch trademark :)

    Good to see geography & demographics aren't mandatory in schools yet.

    Brugge (Flanders, Belgium) is a beauty though..
     
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