Cycling and Bi-focals

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Nartker, Jun 27, 2004.

  1. Nartker

    Nartker Guest

    Has anyone else experienced the dis-orientation experienced while riding with
    bi-focal lenses? Any solutions?


    Nartker @ AOL.com

    Nartker
     
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  2. S o r n i

    S o r n i Guest

    Nartker wrote:
    > Has anyone else experienced the dis-orientation experienced while
    > riding with bi-focal lenses? Any solutions?


    Don't ride with bi-focals.

    Bill "wish they were all that easy" S.
     
  3. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "S o r n i" <[email protected]> writes:
    > Nartker wrote:
    >> Has anyone else experienced the dis-orientation experienced while
    >> riding with bi-focal lenses? Any solutions?

    >
    > Don't ride with bi-focals.
    >
    > Bill "wish they were all that easy" S.


    So, which is the better for riding: single-lens glasses,
    or contact lenses?


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  4. On Sun, 27 Jun 2004 08:02:21 -0700, [email protected] (Tom Keats)
    wrote in message <[email protected]>:

    >which is the better for riding: single-lens glasses,
    >or contact lenses?


    Depends on whether you get on with contacts. I don't, so for me it's
    single-vision glasses, or cycling goggles with prescription inserts.
    For others it's contacts, but generally with goggles to stop the
    contacts drying out.

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
  5. Fred Hall

    Fred Hall Guest

    I ride with bifocals now (until my single vision Rx sunglasses arrive) and
    don't have any problems. When/doing what do you sense the disorientation?
    I do mostly solitary road riding, so I'm not sure if that applies to you or
    not.


    "Nartker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Has anyone else experienced the dis-orientation experienced while riding

    with
    > bi-focal lenses? Any solutions?
    >
    >
    > Nartker @ AOL.com
    >
    > Nartker
    >
    >
    >
     
  6. rfctx

    rfctx Guest

    Nartker wrote:
    > Has anyone else experienced the dis-orientation experienced while riding
    > with bi-focal lenses? Any solutions?
    > Nartker @ AOL.com
    > Nartker




    I’m not sure what I can do about it!! Old age ya know.

    I have shades (Bolle Vigilantes) with single vision inserts, as I am
    nearsighted as well. Doing this I can benefit from the wrap around type
    glasses and simply take them off for close up work. While riding I do
    not get that disorientation that comes with the bi-focal (every thing
    out of focus) lens. Just can’t read the computer while riding.



    --
     
  7. David Crist

    David Crist Guest

    Does anyone know of a magnifying film that could be applied to the
    bike computer's display so that one could ride without the bifocals?

    On 27 Jun 2004 12:05:32 GMT, [email protected]ojunk (Nartker) wrote:

    >Has anyone else experienced the dis-orientation experienced while riding with
    >bi-focal lenses? Any solutions?
    >
    >
    >Nartker @ AOL.com
    >
    >Nartker
    >
    >
     
  8. wannagofast

    wannagofast Guest

    I ride with contacts, set up for monovision, that is one eye is set for
    distance and the other for reading; took a couple of weeks to get use to
    them and in riding in the dusk, loose some depth perception, which can be
    managed. My reading correction is +1.75 from my distance. That is -2.25
    instead of -4.0. Seems to work fine for racing now.


    "Nartker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Has anyone else experienced the dis-orientation experienced while riding

    with
    > bi-focal lenses? Any solutions?
    >
    >
    > Nartker @ AOL.com
    >
    > Nartker
    >
    >
    >
     
  9. Joe Faust

    Joe Faust Guest

    On Sun, 27 Jun 2004 19:56:35 GMT, David Crist
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Does anyone know of a magnifying film that could be applied to the
    >bike computer's display so that one could ride without the bifocals?
    >
    >On 27 Jun 2004 12:05:32 GMT, [email protected]ojunk (Nartker) wrote:
    >
    >>Has anyone else experienced the dis-orientation experienced while riding with
    >>bi-focal lenses? Any solutions?
    >>
    >>
    >>Nartker @ AOL.com
    >>
    >>Nartker
    >>
    >>


    You might be interested:

    "Optx 20/20 Soft Reading Lenses adhere with water, yet are removable
    and reusable to provide optically correct magnification to sunglasses
    and prescription eyewear."

    http://www.optx2020.com/
     
  10. The Real Bev

    The Real Bev Guest

    Nartker wrote:
    >
    > Has anyone else experienced the dis-orientation experienced while riding with
    > bi-focal lenses? Any solutions?


    I've skied and ridden dirt and street bicycles and motorcycles for over
    a decade with bifocals and haven't a clue what you're talking about.
    Sometimes there's a certain amount of confusion right at the line
    between the segment and the rest of the lens (which caused me to fall
    down the last of a flight of stairs, which convinced me that perhaps
    contacts would be worth trying), is that what you mean?

    With contacts I worry about dirt/crud being blown into my eyes,
    otherwise they're a lot better for peripheral vision.

    --
    Cheers,
    Bev
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    "History I believe furnishes no example of a priest-ridden people
    maintaining a free civil government."
    -- letter from Thomas Jefferson to Baron vonHumboldt, 1813
     
  11. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Nartker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Has anyone else experienced the dis-orientation experienced while riding

    with
    > bi-focal lenses? Any solutions?
    >
    >

    I ride with bifocals, and haven't experienced any problems. My regular
    glasses have "progressive" bifocals (can't see a line), and my sunglasses
    are regular bifocals with a line. The progressives took some getting used
    to in general, but I don't remember any bike specific problems.

    The obvious solution is not to wear bifocals. If you need glasses, get a
    pair of single vision glasses (upper prescription) to wear when cycling. Go
    to a cheap optical place like "For Eyes" -- fashion's not really an issue
    here.

    You could carry your bifocals (or a magnifier) in case you need to read
    something

    This will slow you down some if the reason you are wearing bifocals is to
    read a map or cue sheet.


    ---
    Mike Kruger
    Blog: http://journals.aol.com/mikekr/ZbicyclistsZlog/
     
  12. On Sun, 27 Jun 2004 12:05:32 +0000, Nartker wrote:

    > Has anyone else experienced the dis-orientation experienced while riding with
    > bi-focal lenses?


    yes

    Any solutions?

    Time. You will adjust. When I first got my bifocals (OK, "progressive",
    which are really trifocals), I could barely walk down stairs. Now it's
    fine. And I couldn't read a cue sheet or my computer without the bifocals.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | When you are up to your ass in alligators, it's hard to remember
    _`\(,_ | that your initial objective was to drain the swamp. -- LBJ
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  13. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    What disorientation? I ride with tri-focals with no problem. I thought
    there would be trouble, years ago, when I got my new bifocals just before a
    trip to Death Valley, where I was planning to ride a motorcycle on back
    roads, so I kept my old single vision glasses. I never had a problem, and
    have not, to date. My main problem on the bike is that, because I ride
    leaning forward, I often end up looking OVER my glasses, and I have to keep
    pushing them up. (Without the middle or near focus elements I would have
    trouble reading the small stuff on my cyclometer.)
     
  14. On 2004-06-27, S o r n i <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Nartker wrote:
    >> Has anyone else experienced the dis-orientation experienced while
    >> riding with bi-focal lenses? Any solutions?


    > Don't ride with bi-focals.


    Maybe my eyes aren't as bad as yours, but I've ridden with my bifocals
    without much trouble. I usually ride with presciption, non-bifocal
    sunglasses, though, and have a hell of a time reading maps without the
    bifocal.

    --

    -John ([email protected])
     
  15. Patrick Lamb

    Patrick Lamb Guest

    On 27 Jun 2004 12:05:32 GMT, [email protected]ojunk (Nartker) wrote:

    >Has anyone else experienced the dis-orientation experienced while riding with
    >bi-focal lenses? Any solutions?


    I don't know that I'd call it disorientation. Most of my cycling is
    on a road bike, and it's not convenient to check what gear I'm in by
    glancing down at the rear cluster. Checking the road, the traffic,
    the scenery, etc. usually involves looking through the upper portion
    of the lenses.

    Solutions? While I have (older) single-focus sunglasses, I don't
    usually wear them. For a while I'd pull out my last (mono-focal) pair
    of glasses for riding. After a year, I don't bother. I guess I've
    learned to judge more from the relative position of the chain and
    cluster which gear I'm in, rather than trying to count sprockets on
    one side or another.

    As my father-in-law used to say, "Getting old is hell. But it sure
    beats the alternative!"

    Pat

    Email address works as is.
     
  16. The Real Bev

    The Real Bev Guest

    Mike Kruger wrote:
    >
    > "Nartker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > > Has anyone else experienced the dis-orientation experienced while riding
    > > with bi-focal lenses? Any solutions?
    > >

    > I ride with bifocals, and haven't experienced any problems. My regular
    > glasses have "progressive" bifocals (can't see a line), and my sunglasses
    > are regular bifocals with a line. The progressives took some getting used
    > to in general, but I don't remember any bike specific problems.
    >
    > The obvious solution is not to wear bifocals. If you need glasses, get a
    > pair of single vision glasses (upper prescription) to wear when cycling. Go
    > to a cheap optical place like "For Eyes" -- fashion's not really an issue
    > here.


    One annoying thing -- wire frames having been popular for several years,
    so that's what most of the cheap ones are. Terrible for keeping wind
    out of your eyes, as I found out afterward.

    > You could carry your bifocals (or a magnifier) in case you need to read
    > something


    When they're in stock, you can get excellent reading glasses at the
    99-Cent-Only store. Choose something ugly so you won't care when you
    break them.

    > This will slow you down some if the reason you are wearing bifocals is to
    > read a map or cue sheet.


    --
    Cheers,
    Bev
    oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
    If it weren't for pain, we wouldn't have any fun at all.
     
  17. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Leo Lichtman wrote:
    || What disorientation? I ride with tri-focals with no problem. I
    || thought there would be trouble, years ago, when I got my new
    || bifocals just before a trip to Death Valley, where I was planning to
    || ride a motorcycle on back roads, so I kept my old single vision
    || glasses. I never had a problem, and have not, to date. My main
    || problem on the bike is that, because I ride leaning forward, I often
    || end up looking OVER my glasses, and I have to keep pushing them up.
    || (Without the middle or near focus elements I would have trouble
    || reading the small stuff on my cyclometer.)

    I don't have a problem either. In fact, I prefer to ride with mine. I have
    those kind with the blended lenses. When I'm riding, I'm mostly looking out
    of the upper part of the lenses, so I've never had any problems whatsoever.
    My lenses are even those high index of refraction kind, so lines bend
    strongly near the extremes of my lenses.
     
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