Cycling and running: reflections on compatibility.

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by dot, Mar 19, 2007.

  1. dot

    dot New Member

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    Recently I've skimmed through a book written by a pretty famous local coach. He is coaching I. Kalentieva and many more less successful but still strong racers. He uses running all year round for XC training. He substantiates his position asserting that an XC racer has to have an ability to run well when it's not possible to ride and a rider has to be accustomed to running stress. Running (jogging) might also be used as relaxation after an intensive cycling session.
     
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  2. bikeguy

    bikeguy New Member

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    Running stresses the joints a lot. If you want to maintain or build aerobic fitness, I'd suggest swimming which doesn't stress the joints. Just went swimming today, and the riding I've done helped me swim better - did 550 m in one go at a decent pace and didn't feel winded at all, and haven't swum in a year. I did this because my legs have become sore and I want to train aerobic power without continuing to stress my legs.

    -bikeguy
     
  3. kopride

    kopride Member

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    I tend to agree that running is important and should be part of the routine in the off season. First, it is very efficent. In the time it takes to pump your tires, fill your water bottles, and get past the typical traffic lights to start the ride, you can run a mile. Second, you're less dependent on weather. Third, it seems to drain pounds off very quickly compared with even the hardest cycling. Again, time is the great leveler. Try going out for a three hour run sometime. Minute by minute, the edge goes to running. Fourth, it is easier to pack your running shoes on a business trip than your bike.
     
  4. Pendejo

    Pendejo Member

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    I was a competitive runner for many years. Then I switched to competitive cycling. Last year I decided to renew the running career, in addition to the cycling, and it wasn't long after I started running hard again that my Achilles tendons got very sore. I had to drop the running. Apparently hard cycling tightens the calves up, along with the Achilles, and makes one more susceptible to such injuries. I suppose I could have tried to solve the problem with stretching, but I don't like stretching and don't believe it would have made a big difference. (I should also mention that I'm 60, which some might say could have contributed to my problem. But I have not yet gotten to the point of admitting any effects of aging in me, nor have I had to.)
     
  5. kopride

    kopride Member

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    The calf tightness is true without a doubt. I always stretch then out before and after runs and cycling. If you don't then you will get the inevitable heel pain of plantar fascitis, and some achilles pain after the runs. You will get more injuries from high mileage running

    Still, cycling is a very time demanding sport. Another post is a guy worried that 5 hours a week cycling won't prepare him for a race. 5 hours at 8 mph pace running is 40 miles per week. You could easily be on good 10k pace with that kind of time commitment, particulalry if you mix in some intervals and track work.

    I also think short sprints running are great for overall fitness. It keeps the weight off and gets the heart rate in the red zone quickly. When your kids are young and time is at a premium, it is tough to beat a good run.
     
  6. Romis

    Romis New Member

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    I am a cyclist, mainly XC races is my hobby. But I have realized, that running for at least some 20 minutes every morning improves my rough terrain racing ability. My rough terrain racing some seasons ago was terribly bad, now it is improved a lot.
     
  7. mikesbytes

    mikesbytes New Member

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    Hey Pendejo, you could add a couple of yoga classes to help with some of the problems you are having, including the Achilles tendons.

    Triatheletes combine running and cycling.
     
  8. dmstone1

    dmstone1 New Member

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    I read somewhere that cycling stretches your legs. you dont notice it but it does happen. I compete at the college level now as far as running. If you plan to try to run again I would suggest that you run an easy mile then stretch. I dont stretch at all. many once every couple of weeks. I just dont believe in it.
     
  9. tux259

    tux259 New Member

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    I wish I could become a runner, but my body just can't handle it. I have had reconstructive knee surgery on one of my knees. Without a brace, my knee will swell from even the most modest runnig (15 minutes) for days. With a brace, it will just be incredibly uncomfortable. Additionally, it seems that no matter what shoes I try, I get horrible shin splints.

    That said, after a good bike ride at home, I love to hop into the pool for a quick couple of laps. I feel great after doing it and I know it helps my body relax and recharge.
     
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