Cycling and the spine

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by David S . Maddi, Mar 31, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Does anyone know what affect cycling exercise has on the spine, good, bad or indifferent?

    David
     
    Tags:


  2. Mark Lee

    Mark Lee Guest

    "David S. Maddison" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Does anyone know what affect cycling exercise has on the spine, good, bad or indifferent?
    >
    Can be bad - ruptured L5-S1 disk here, operated Nov 2001. Still plays up but I was nearly crippled
    before the op. Michael Klim got the same thing from swimming and I saw people in hospital who got it
    from Netball or from lack of exercise. Mark Lee
     
  3. Alan Erskine

    Alan Erskine Guest

    "Mark Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "David S. Maddison" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > Does anyone know what affect cycling exercise has on the spine, good, bad or indifferent?
    > >
    > Can be bad - ruptured L5-S1 disk here, operated Nov 2001. Still plays up but I was nearly crippled
    > before the op. Michael Klim got the same thing from swimming and I saw people in hospital who got
    > it from Netball or from lack of exercise. Mark Lee
    >
    >

    In other words, anyone and everyone gets the same thing. Biking isn't bad for the spine as long as
    you stay away from V-8 phallic symbols, or 4x4 bull bars.

    --
    Alan Erskine alanerskine(at)optusnet.com.au The Coalition of the Willing, against the Axis of Evil,
    In a War of the Damned
     
  4. Paul Worden

    Paul Worden Guest

    Upright bicycles are not the kind on the body. That's why I and an increasing number of older
    riders, are turning to recumbent trikes and bikes. Safer - admittedly a couple of kph slower (unless
    you buy the lightweight low seat models) and very comfortable. I did a GVBR and was fresh after each
    days lying down....... somewhere to sit while you have a cappucino beside the road. And that's why
    I'm selling my almost new Avanti Vivace. Lovely bike...but..........
    http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3601839699

    Paul W (For a comfortable and reasonably priced trike try http://mrrecumbenttrikes.com/) - I've done
    2000 kms on mine and all I've had to do to it is oil the chain.)
     
  5. Angie

    Angie Guest

    "David S. Maddison" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Does anyone know what affect cycling exercise has on the spine, good, bad or indifferent?
    >
    > David
    >

    Here's a couple of articles of interest. There's plenty in the medical literature, if you want
    to get right into it. From Spine-Health.com: Specific sports: bicycling Stresses
    a.. Little conditioning is provided to the back muscles by cycling

    b.. Back posture on the bicycle can strain the lower back (a result of the lumbar spine
    flexing or pulling up) or the upper back (a result of the neck arching back)

    c.. Rough terrain increases jarring and compression to the spine

    Prevention

    d.. Select the best bicycle for your purpose. For casual riders, consider a mountain bike
    with higher, straight handle bars (allow more upright posture) and bigger tires (more
    shock absorption) versus a racing style bicycle

    e. . Adjust the machine properly to fit your body, with the
    assistance of an experienced professional at a bicycle shop if possible

    f.. Use proper form; distribute some weight to the arms and keep the chest up; shift
    positions periodically, gently lifting and lowering the head to loosen the neck

    g.. Remember to push and pull with the legs, the pulling component being equally as
    important as the pushing portion

    h.. Use shock absorbing accessories including seats and seat covers, handlebar covers,
    gloves and including shock absorbers on the wheels (front shocks or full suspension shocks
    depending on the type of riding and the terrain)

    i.. Do some back strengthening exercises in conjunction with your bicycling routine

    From British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol 33, Issue 6 398-400, Copyright © 1999 by British
    Association of Sport and Medicine Effect of changing the saddle angle on the incidence of low
    back pain in recreational bicyclists M Salai, T Brosh, A Blankstein, A Oran and A Chechik
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery A, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.

    OBJECTIVE: According to the literature, 30-70% of cyclists suffer from cervical, dorsal, or
    lumbar back pain. This study was conducted to evaluate one of the possible causes of low back
    pain and to suggest a solution by appropriate adjustments to the bicycle. METHODS: Serial
    fluoroscopic studies were performed while cyclists sat on different types of bicycle (sports,
    mountain, and city). Pelvic/spine angles were measured at different seat angles, and the
    related force vectors analysed. RESULTS: There was a tendency towards hyperextension of the
    pelvic/spine angle which resulted in an increase in tensile forces at the promontorium. These
    forces can easily be reduced by appropriate adjustment of the seat angle--that is, by creating
    an anterior inclining angle. The findings of the biomechanical analysis were then applied to a
    group of cyclists who were members of a cycling club and who complained of low back pain.
    After appropriate adjustment of the saddle angle, most of the cyclists (>70%) reported major
    improvement in the incidence and magnitude of their back pain. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence and
    magnitude of back pain in cyclists can be reduced by appropriate adjustment of the angle of
    the saddle. It is important that these findings be conveyed to cyclists, bicycle salesmen,
    trainers, and members of the general public who engage in cycling, in order to decrease the
    prevalence of back pain.
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    "David S. Maddison" > wrote
    > Does anyone know what affect cycling exercise has on the spine, good, bad or indifferent?
    >
    > David
    >

    Cycling helps to strengthen the lower and mid back muscles evenly. Not a lot of twisting involved in
    cycling so it shouldnt lead to any spine damage from that sort of strain. Neck and upper spine may
    be affected by too much head down bum up type cycling. Need to work on flexibility and
    strengthen/stretch muscles in that region. Some muscle groups like the quads can get too well
    developed and can cause imbalances with opposing muscles which could lead to problems with hips and
    alignment generally so need to work on those weaker muscles - plus stretches and maybe some cross
    training like walking and swimming.

    bobm
     
  7. Its a shocker. More upright the better, but it makes the activity much harder. Proper bike fit is
    essential.

    Stiffness in the thorasic area results in too much strain on the lower back.

    This is where the tennis ball massage helps. Place the balls either side of your spine and lay back
    to work some flexibility into the thorasic curve.

    You can use the balls to break up lumps in your gluts which also helps to let go of your spine
    a bit too.

    No self help for the neck I'm afraid.

    scott

    "David S. Maddison" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Does anyone know what affect cycling exercise has on the spine, good, bad or indifferent?
    >
    > David
     
  8. Angie wrote:

    > "David S. Maddison" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Does anyone know what affect cycling exercise has on the spine, good, bad or indifferent?
    >>
    >>David

    ..snip..

    > Prevention
    >
    > a.. Select the best bicycle for your purpose. For casual riders, consider a mountain bike
    > with higher, straight handle bars (allow more upright posture) and bigger tires (more
    > shock absorption) versus a racing style bicycle

    ...snip...

    > c.. Use proper form; distribute some weight to the arms and keep the chest up; shift
    > positions periodically, gently lifting and lowering the head to loosen the neck

    So (a) - pick an upright bike with flat bars so that all your weight is on the seat and you have
    only one hand position, and then (c) don't pick an upright bike so that your weight is held on your
    hands, and move your hands around to other positions.

    Adrian
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    Adrian Tritschler mailto:[email protected] Latitude 38°S, Longitude 145°E,
    Altitude 50m, Shoe size 44
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
     
  9. Blind Freddy

    Blind Freddy Guest

    "Adrian Tritschler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | Angie wrote:
    |
    | > "David S. Maddison" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    | > news:[email protected]...
    | >
    | >>Does anyone know what affect cycling exercise has on the spine, good, bad or indifferent?
    | >>
    | >>David
    |
    | ..snip..
    |
    | > Prevention
    | >
    | > a.. Select the best bicycle for your purpose. For casual riders, consider a mountain
    | > bike with higher, straight handle bars (allow more upright posture) and bigger tires
    | > (more shock absorption) versus a
    racing
    | > style bicycle
    |
    | ...snip...
    |
    | > c.. Use proper form; distribute some weight to the arms and keep
    the
    | > chest up; shift positions periodically, gently lifting and lowering the
    head
    | > to loosen the neck
    |
    | So (a) - pick an upright bike with flat bars so that all your weight is on
    the
    | seat and you have only one hand position, and then (c) don't pick an
    upright
    | bike so that your weight is held on your hands, and move your hands around
    to
    | other positions.
    |
    | Adrian
    | ---------------------------------------------------------------
    | Adrian Tritschler mailto:[email protected] Latitude 38°S, Longitude 145°E,
    | Altitude 50m, Shoe size 44
    | ---------------------------------------------------------------
    |

    You should be a little bit foward leaning so that when you go over bumps the full force isn't
    transmitted up the spine.

    Marty
     
  10. Chester1

    Chester1 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    0
    [Isn't at least part of the idea to keep your back straight, not necessarily straight up and down, but not hunched overi in the middle.

    I had back problems which have more or less been sorted by a correct postioning set up, yoga and visits to a chiropractor (who is also a cyclist.)

    Regards.
     
  11. Loki

    Loki New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2003
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0
    Weird...my back pain has all but dissapeared ever since I got my XC bike and started riding every day. (and XC riding every weekend)
    Of course I do experience a lot of pain during and after ANY hill climbing, and a few other people I know do also. Maybe it's my posture when climbing or something.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...