Cycling backward

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bernard Durand, Mar 10, 2003.

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  1. I am not sure of this question should be ask on this newsgroup. I apology if not and by all means,
    point me to the right newsgroup.

    I have seen and have tried a couple of time to pedal backward while taking a spinning class. Is
    there any advantage in pedalling backward while training on a spinning bike or a trainer?

    Also, someone told me that spinning backward is quite harmful to the pedals as they can become
    loose!!! Is this correct?

    Regards

    Bernard Durand

    Ottawa
     
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  2. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Bernard Durand" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > I have seen and have tried a couple of time to pedal backward while taking a spinning class. Is
    > there any advantage in pedalling backward while training on a spinning bike or a trainer?

    I sometimes use my fixed gear bike on an indoor mag trainer. I've found it fun sometimes to pedal
    backwards. The surprising thing is that there seems to be absolutely no difference in degree of
    difficulty in maintaining a given power level & duration whether going forward or back. I don't
    think there's any advantage to this, other than amusing oneself. It uses the same muscles.

    > Also, someone told me that spinning backward is quite harmful to the pedals as they can become
    > loose!!! Is this correct?

    Left pedals are left (reverse) threaded for a reason. In theory, I guess pedaling backwards risks
    unscrewing pedals, but I haven't had that happen in my (admittedly brief) forays into contrary
    pedaling. If pedals do become loose, and are ridden that way, the soft threads in the (usually)
    aluminum cranks can get chewed up pretty fast. I guess on a spin cycle the cranks would be steel, so
    damage would be slower and more distributed. I can't say I've ever ridden on loose pedals, so I
    don't know how obvious they are.
     
  3. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    "Bernard Durand" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I am not sure of this question should be ask on this newsgroup. I apology if not and by all means,
    >point me to the right newsgroup.
    >
    >I have seen and have tried a couple of time to pedal backward while taking a spinning class. Is
    >there any advantage in pedalling backward while training on a spinning bike or a trainer?

    Doing so might concentrate on a slightly different set of muscles than "normal cycling", but if
    you're contemplating doing this as training for "normal cycling", why bother. If, OTOH, you are
    planning on riding a fixed gear bike backwards for any length of time, it may be just the ticket!

    >Also, someone told me that spinning backward is quite harmful to the pedals as they can become
    >loose!!! Is this correct?

    If they're tightened properly there shouldn't be any problem. However, the tendency will be for the
    pedals to unscrew as you ride. While you won't "crash" in the classic sense if a pedal DOES come
    off, I can only imagine the damage that a fully spun-up spin cycle flywheel would do to your still
    attached leg if you DID fall off the bike. It could be ugly.

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  4. "Bernard Durand" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am not sure of this question should be ask on this newsgroup. I apology if not and by all means,
    > point me to the right newsgroup.
    >
    > I have seen and have tried a couple of time to pedal backward while taking a spinning class. Is
    > there any advantage in pedalling backward while training on a spinning bike or a trainer?
    >
    > Also, someone told me that spinning backward is quite harmful to the pedals as they can become
    > loose!!! Is this correct?

    Why are you pedaling backward at all? I've heard this used as a tactic by some of the more
    adventurous velodrome racers to gain the rear position in a match sprint...but I'm guessing you're
    not one of those...

    On a trainer, with a freewheel bicycle, you can pedal backward all you like to no avail. The
    freewheel mechanism in the rear wheel will allow you to pedal backward, and will not engage the
    wheel in a driving action.

    On a trainer, with a fixed-gear bicycle (that is, a bicycle without a freewheel) you would engage
    the drivetrain and the wheel would indeed spin backwards.

    That still begs the question why on earth you'd want to do it.

    -Luigi pedalling forwards gets me from A to B pedalling backwards engages my coaster brake. (man I
    miss my nice bike at home)
     
  5. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    Bernard Durand wrote:
    > Also, someone told me that spinning backward is quite harmful to the pedals as they can become
    > loose!!! Is this correct?

    No, but you get the opposite of anything you pray for, if you pray on the trainer.
    --
    Ron Hardin [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  6. Luigi de Guzman <[email protected]> wrote:
    : That still begs the question why on earth you'd want to do it.

    i've tried riding backwards on my track bike (on the road) with almost no success. i can do it ok on
    the rollers, however. anyone have any luck beyond a few meters?
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  7. 10 Mar 2003 21:25:32 GMT, David Reuteler :
    > Luigi de Guzman <[email protected]> wrote:
    >: That still begs the question why on earth you'd want to do it.
    >
    > i've tried riding backwards on my track bike (on the road) with almost no success. i can do it ok
    > on the rollers, however. anyone have any luck beyond a few meters?

    I have seen one man riding backward during Cycle Messengers World Championships. He made at least 30
    circles (about 15-20 meters each) and he can do much more.

    maciek
     
  8. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "David Reuteler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Steve McDonald <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : Put on thinking caps and it becomes obvious that the pedals and the crank on a freewheel
    > : bike spin in the forward direction when applying power, even when you're facing backwards
    > : and the pedals would not come unscrewed. Only if you're on a track bike and are pedaling
    > : the crank in a backwards direction, do the pedals have a reversed spin under power.
    >
    > you would spin the seat 180 degrees, sit on it and ride forward backwards? you're a weird
    > boy steve.

    Spin the seat? Don't most of these backwards-riders sit on the handlebars?

    -Buck
     
  9. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    I can ride backwards, but not the way y'all are thinking. It involves sitting on the handlebars or
    close to it and pedaling the normal direction (but backwards to the driver). Learned it as a kid.
    This works best with cruiser style bars that'll cradle your ass.

    Robin Hubert
     
  10. Buck <j u n k m a i l @ g a l a x y c o r p . c o m> wrote:
    : Spin the seat? Don't most of these backwards-riders sit on the handlebars? -Buck

    apparently.
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  11. M Gagnon

    M Gagnon Guest

    "Bernard Durand" wrote:

    >I have seen and have tried a couple of time to pedal backward while taking
    a
    > spinning class. Is there any advantage in pedalling backward while
    training
    > on a spinning bike or a trainer?

    I cycle only outside, so my comments might not fit adequately. I have pedalled backwards a few times
    when going downhill. Don't ask me why, but at that time, one a bike with rattrap pedals but without
    toe clips, it seemed an easier way to relax on long downhills (> 2-3 km) than by pedalling forward
    at a low pace. In hindsight, now that I use toe clips (for the last 23 years), I don't think I ever
    pedalled backwards since.

    >
    > Also, someone told me that spinning backward is quite harmful to the
    pedals
    > as they can become loose!!! Is this correct?

    It's actually the opposite. Or it might be. The right pedal screws on normally, but the left pedal
    uses left-hand thread. As long as your pedals are in good shape, I don't see any problem. However,
    if the bearings in your pedals seize, the pedals would unscrew if you pedal forward, but tighten
    more if you pedal backwards. I let you think of what would happen if your pedal jam suddently while
    you spin backwards at 100 rpm...

    Regards,

    --
    Michel Gagnon -- Montréal (Québec, Canada) mailto:[email protected]
     
  12. Robin Hubert <[email protected]> wrote:
    : I can ride backwards, but not the way y'all are thinking. It involves sitting on the handlebars or
    : close to it and pedaling the normal direction (but backwards to the driver). Learned it as a kid.
    : This works best with cruiser style bars that'll cradle your ass.

    Er..., um... to do this I'd have to swap the pedals around to be able to clip in, but being opposite
    threaded this isn't possible. Oh, I know, I could swap the spindles around - too cool!

    Cheerz Lynzz
     
  13. Garmonboezia

    Garmonboezia Guest

    Maciej Ostaszewski <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > 10 Mar 2003 21:25:32 GMT, David Reuteler :
    >> Luigi de Guzman <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>: That still begs the question why on earth you'd want to do it.
    >>
    >> i've tried riding backwards on my track bike (on the road) with almost
    no
    >> success. i can do it ok on the rollers, however. anyone have any luck beyond a few meters?
    >
    > I have seen one man riding backward during Cycle Messengers World Championships. He made at least
    > 30 circles (about 15-20 meters each) and
    he
    > can do much more.
    >
    > maciek

    What city was he from?
     
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