Cycling clothes without looking a berk?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Doki, Mar 12, 2004.

  1. Doki

    Doki Guest

    What do you lot wear for riding a bike then? I'd prefer to
    avoid lycra and so on ;). I've been riding around in jeans
    and army surplus trousers (p'raps I shouldn't have bought
    the lightweight summer clobber) and keep finding that my
    legs have frozen. Any ideas on something normal looking and
    a bit warmer?
     
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  2. On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 19:53:02 -0000, in
    <[email protected]>, "Doki"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What do you lot wear for riding a bike then? I'd prefer to
    >avoid lycra and so on ;). I've been riding around in jeans
    >and army surplus trousers (p'raps I shouldn't have bought
    >the lightweight summer clobber) and keep finding that my
    >legs have frozen. Any ideas on something normal looking and
    >a bit warmer?

    Jeans are a bad idea in anycase since when they are wet
    they stay wet forever. I find them uncomfortable for
    cycling even when dry.

    Longjohns underneath will help and won't make you look a
    berk!

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  3. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Doki wrote:
    > What do you lot wear for riding a bike then? I'd prefer to
    > avoid lycra and so on ;). I've been riding around in jeans
    > and army surplus trousers (p'raps I shouldn't have bought
    > the lightweight summer clobber) and keep finding that my
    > legs have frozen. Any ideas on something normal looking
    > and a bit warmer?

    Nothing wrong with lycra. A pair of Ronhill Tracksters or
    Bikesters over the top works well when it's cold.

    --
    Danny Colyer (the UK company has been laughed out of my reply address)
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  4. Doki

    Doki Guest

    Richard Bates wrote:
    > On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 19:53:02 -0000, in
    > <[email protected]>, "Doki"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> What do you lot wear for riding a bike then? I'd prefer
    >> to avoid lycra and so on ;). I've been riding around in
    >> jeans and army surplus trousers (p'raps I shouldn't have
    >> bought the lightweight summer clobber) and keep finding
    >> that my legs have frozen. Any ideas on something normal
    >> looking and a bit warmer?
    >
    > Jeans are a bad idea in anycase since when they are wet
    > they stay wet forever. I find them uncomfortable for
    > cycling even when dry.

    That's what I thought, so I've only worn them for the ride
    from the shed to the backdoor ;). The army surplus stuff has
    the advantage of being mostly or all manmade guff so it
    dries out very quickly.

    > Longjohns underneath will help and won't make you
    > look a berk!

    Nice!
     
  5. Doki

    Doki Guest

    Danny Colyer wrote:
    > Doki wrote:
    >> What do you lot wear for riding a bike then? I'd prefer
    >> to avoid lycra and so on ;). I've been riding around in
    >> jeans and army surplus trousers (p'raps I shouldn't have
    >> bought the lightweight summer clobber) and keep finding
    >> that my legs have frozen. Any ideas on something normal
    >> looking and a bit warmer?
    >
    > Nothing wrong with lycra.

    There's a lot wrong with it. There'd be even more wrong with
    it if I wore it
    :).

    > A pair of Ronhill Tracksters or Bikesters
    > over the top works well when it's cold.

    Will google.
     
  6. > What do you lot wear for riding a bike then? I'd prefer to
    > avoid lycra and so on ;). I've been riding around in jeans
    > and army surplus trousers (p'raps I shouldn't have bought
    > the lightweight summer clobber) and keep finding that my
    > legs have frozen. Any ideas on something normal looking
    > and a bit warmer?

    When cycling to the gym/frisbee practice I just wear my
    tracksuit bottoms. They're made out of some manmade stuff
    with a loose cotton liner. They're windproof, light, and
    warm (I guess 'cos of the cotton liner stuff, and the
    windproofness) and baggy enough to give lots of room. One of
    the more cunning bits is that from the shins down the liner
    is made of more man made non absorbant stuff so it doesn't
    get too sodden in the rain. They cost I guess £12-20 in JJBs
    or similar.

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  7. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Doki" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Danny Colyer wrote:
    > > Doki wrote:
    > >> What do you lot wear for riding a bike then? I'd prefer
    > >> to avoid lycra and so on ;). I've been riding around in
    > >> jeans and army surplus trousers (p'raps I shouldn't
    > >> have bought the lightweight summer clobber) and keep
    > >> finding that my legs have frozen. Any ideas on
    > >> something normal looking and a bit warmer?
    > >
    > > Nothing wrong with lycra.
    >
    > There's a lot wrong with it. There'd be even more wrong
    > with it if I wore
    it
    > :).
    >
    > > A pair of Ronhill Tracksters or Bikesters
    > > over the top works well when it's cold.
    >
    > Will google.

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk have them for £22.99 (plus post) on
    their home page.

    Jeans are what I wear most of the time but Lycra does a
    better job as cycling apparel and neoprene for watersports,
    nothing to do with fashion or what others think, just what
    works best :)
    --
    Regards, Pete
     
  8. T-shirt + jumper/fleece Ron Hill Tracksters (but they aren't
    very warm) or M&S leggings Tchibo cycling jacket (loads of
    reflective tape but no yucky fluo yellow anywhere)

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  9. "Doki" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Danny Colyer wrote:
    > >
    > > Nothing wrong with lycra.
    >
    > There's a lot wrong with it. There'd be even more wrong
    > with it if I wore
    it
    > :).
    >

    Before I started cycling regularly I always thought I'd
    _never_ wear lycra. But, I saw the advantage of padded
    cycling briefs and put them on under regular shorts.. then I
    thought if this is good, maybe 'proper' cycling shorts with
    the padded bit sewn in would be better.. and it was. I moved
    to lycra shorts, then a lycra top, then lycra tights for
    cold weather. And I realised how stupid I'd been to rubbish
    it and think it wasn't for me. Lycra is highly practical
    cycling gear. It is warm to the touch, it is comfortable, it
    is close fitting so it doesn't flap around and create drag,
    it flexes easily at the joints and doesn't chaff the skin,
    it is light, it is breathable, it dries quickly and easily.
    It is a perfectly sensible choice of material for cycle
    clothing and cyclists wearing it don't look like 'berks'.
    They look like.. cyclists!

    Rich
     
  10. David Waters

    David Waters Guest

    If I am out for a ride (in winter), then I will wear hiking
    socks, my cycling shoes, lycra shorts (and if it is really
    bitter a pair of hiking style shorts on top. Up top I will
    generally wear a base layer, with either a winter style
    cycling top or gillet, and then a waterproof & breathable
    shell. On my head I wear a helmet and if particularly bitter
    I contrive to fit some kind of breathable hat underneath.

    My legs don't seem to get cold when wearing shorts unless
    the windchill factor is particularly high.

    Avoid Cotton at ALL costs. It gets wet then stays wet. Lycra
    or polyester is definitely the way to go because if it does
    get wet then it dries.
     
  11. Whingin' Pom

    Whingin' Pom Guest

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 23:59:21 -0000, "Richard Goodman"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It is a perfectly sensible choice of material for cycle
    > clothing and cyclists wearing it don't look like 'berks'.
    > They look like.. cyclists!

    Only if the definition of cyclist includes "130kg of
    badly made shrink-wrapped sausages". Lycra is not a
    option for me. :-(

    I've found that some walking-type outdoors-ey gear works
    well for me, it's comfy, doesn't chafe, dries quick and is
    light and warmish. Agree with the long-johns trick, though.

    --
    Matt K Dunedin, NZ
     
  12. Tom Anderson

    Tom Anderson Guest

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 23:59:21 -0000, "Richard Goodman"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Lycra is highly practical cycling gear. It is warm to the
    >touch, it is comfortable, it is close fitting so it doesn't
    >flap around and create drag, it flexes easily at the joints
    >and doesn't chaff the skin, it is light, it is breathable,
    >it dries quickly and easily.

    and they enhance the outline of those new thighs that
    cycling have given me.

    Seriously, I couldn't wear lycra shorts w/o covering them
    with a pair of shorts. Don't give a toss now. I wear lycra
    shorts or longs, depending on the weather, for all my
    cycling. Sooo comfy.

    Best wishes Tom Anderson Leighton Buzzard, BEDS England

    and a woman is just a woman but a good cigar is a smoke
    (Rudyard Kipling)
     
  13. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    "Doki" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Danny Colyer wrote:
    <snip>
    > There's a lot wrong with it. There'd be even more wrong
    > with it if I wore
    it
    > :).

    If it's the closeness of the fit that bothers you, Endura
    do something called multitights. They are a looser cut,
    roubaix lycra tight and I can vouch for their comfort. They
    look more light a pair of close fitting tracksuit bottoms
    than tights.

    Jon
     
  14. There is another reason to avoid cotton (Jeans).

    Cotton transmits 80 times as much heat when wet as compared
    to when it's dry. Wool is the same wet or dry as is fleece.
    That's shy sheep don't grow cotton and why cotton is ideal
    for tropical climates. Maybe tropical sheep have it??
     
  15. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 20:28:52 -0000, "Doki" <[email protected]>
    wrote in message <[email protected]>:

    >> Nothing wrong with lycra.
    >There's a lot wrong with it. There'd be even more wrong
    >with it if I wore it

    Thing is, though there is a reason why so many cyclists wear
    the kit. It works. It doesn't drag the legs, keeps out of
    the way of chains and such, has pockets at the back which is
    handy on a wedgie and so on. If it gets wet, it dries out
    quickly as you ride, and most cycle clothing is made of
    modern fabrics which wick well and don't stink when you get
    sweaty (I find cycling in cotton shirts makes you smell like
    a woolshed on a rainy afternoon in about ten minutes). You
    can get lined MTB shorts which look no different from
    ordinary shorts, I guess, but don't dismiss the good cycling
    gear just because you haven't ridden your bike enough to
    look good in it yet. Think of it as an incentive scheme ;-)

    --
    Guy
    ===
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  16. Gearóid Ó Laoi/Garry Lee wrote:
    > Wool is the same wet or dry as is fleece. That's shy sheep
    > don't grow cotton and why cotton is ideal for tropical
    > climates. Maybe tropical sheep have it??

    Interesting thought.

    Anyway, about wool - it's what they used to wear before
    lycra was invented, isn't it. Merino wool, specifically.

    If you want to look *very* cool in a tight-fitting top, get
    one of these: http://www.vintagevelos.com/jer-peugeot1.html
    http://www.vintagevelos.com/jer-molteni_arcore1.html http://www.vintagevelos.com/jer-
    cinzano1.html

    d.
     
  17. Richard Goodman wrote:
    > choice of material for cycle clothing and cyclists wearing
    > it don't look like 'berks'. They look like.. cyclists!

    My wife says I look 'cute' when I'm fully togged out in neck-to-
    ankle lycra.

    I'm a complete convert to the lycra cause. My mum got me
    some bib tights for christmas - she found it highly amusing
    buying tights for her own grown-up son, but I tell you what:
    they have been a godsend in the recent freezing weather.

    If you're not keen on a tight lycra top, a football shirt is
    a good alternative - they're reasonably close fitting and
    made out of material that's appropriate for sporting
    activities (ie not cotton). Lightweight tracksuit trousers
    with elasticated ankles are probably a good non-berk
    alternative to lycra - and you can still wear your comfy
    padded shorts underneath without anyone noticing.

    d.
     
  18. Congokid

    Congokid Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Jon
    Senior <[email protected]_REMOVE_lemon.co.uk> writes

    >If it's the closeness of the fit that bothers you, Endura
    >do something called multitights. They are a looser cut,
    >roubaix lycra tight and I can vouch for their comfort. They
    >look more light a pair of close fitting tracksuit bottoms
    >than tights.

    They look pretty skin-tight to me: http://www.endura.co.uk/tights-
    multi.html

    --
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  19. Congokid

    Congokid Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Doki
    <[email protected]> writes
    >What do you lot wear for riding a bike then? I'd prefer to
    >avoid lycra and so on ;). I've been riding around in jeans
    >and army surplus trousers (p'raps I shouldn't have bought
    >the lightweight summer clobber) and keep finding that my
    >legs have frozen. Any ideas on something normal looking and
    >a bit warmer?

    I've tended to avoid lycra for the same reasons. In winter I
    wear fleece Altura cruiser pants with foot stirrups over
    padded shorts - although they're not the warmest things in
    cold wind or water repellent. I've had warmer fleece
    trousers in the past from Zoic, but they don't seem to do
    them anymore.

    --
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  20. Congokid

    Congokid Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, david
    kenning <[email protected]> writes

    >Anyway, about wool - it's what they used to wear before
    >lycra was invented, isn't it. Merino wool, specifically.

    I have a 100 per cent merino wool shirt from Swobo - very
    cosy worn underneath anything in winter.

    --
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