Cycling Competitively

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by dannyfrankszzz, Sep 1, 2004.

  1. dannyfrankszzz

    dannyfrankszzz New Member

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    If I wanted to start cycling competitively, what would be the best way of going about this. I've decided that the best way of getting practice and getting competition fit is to compete.

    I heard something about a road race competition where participants gain points over a season.
     
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  2. >If I wanted to start cycling competitively, what would be the best way
    >of going about this.


    See

    www.bcf.uk.com for the web site of British Cycling

    and

    www.ctt.org.uk for the web site of Cycling Time Trials

    Both have links to find out about clubs in any given area in GB.

    Cheers, helen s



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  3. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    dannyfrankszzz wrote:
    > If I wanted to start cycling competitively, what would be the best way
    > of going about this.


    Step 1, what sort of competition do you have in mind? Track, TT, road
    racing, MTB XC, MTB downhill, HPV?

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  4. dannyfrankszzz wrote:

    > If I wanted to start cycling competitively, what would be the best way
    > of going about this. I've decided that the best way of getting
    > practice and getting competition fit is to compete.
    >
    > I heard something about a road race competition where participants gain
    > points over a season.
    >
    >

    First join your local club (see www.britishcycling.org.uk and "Find a
    club").

    If you want to time trial, any decent club will have weekly 10 mile
    event during the season (now over for evening TTs in most places due to
    lack of daylight).

    If you want to road race you need to cough up £30 for a British Cycling
    licence, and you can only enter races taking "4th category" riders until
    you start winning things and accumulating points.

    My advice would be to ride socially with the club this winter, train
    hard on your own and think about getting a licence in 2005.
     
  5. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Peter Clinch [email protected] opined the following...
    > Step 1, what sort of competition do you have in mind? Track, TT, road
    > racing, MTB XC, MTB downhill, HPV?


    All of them obviously. Anything less shows a lack of commitment! :)

    Jon
     
  6. davek

    davek Guest

    Zog The Undeniable wrote:
    > If you want to road race you need to cough up £30 for a British Cycling
    > licence, and you can only enter races taking "4th category" riders until
    > you start winning things and accumulating points.


    I'm considering this myself - I like the Audax stuff but I do have a bit
    of a competitive streak.

    I know at the lower levels of cycling that a lot of people continue to
    compete well into their 40s and even beyond, but is there much precedent
    for people starting in competitive cycling when they are already into
    their 30s?

    And what kind of level do you need to be at to get points in a cat 4
    road race?

    d.
     
  7. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    davek <[email protected]> wrote:

    : And what kind of level do you need to be at to get points in a cat 4
    : road race?

    I've never managed it :(

    The only way to see is to try it. People do take up racing in their
    30/40s and do well.

    Join a local race club and see how it goes.

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org
    "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  8. Jack Ouzzi

    Jack Ouzzi Guest

    On Thu, 02 Sep 2004 18:16:44 +0100, davek <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >
    >I know at the lower levels of cycling that a lot of people continue to
    >compete well into their 40s and even beyond, but is there much precedent
    >for people starting in competitive cycling when they are already into
    >their 30s?
    >


    Why not indeed .......... after a brief schoolboy spell ( about 2
    years) until the girls came along :) I started in my early 30's, and
    raced for about 8 years (mainly TT's) I was a bit of a 'natural', not
    being big headed, but by that I mean size, shape weight .. for a
    cyclist ... found it easier than most of my mates (to thier annoyance)
    to train and race, and if I had had more money (mortgage, 2 kids,
    wife, car, long working hours etc etc) I might have 'moved on' to
    better things ..............

    Did quite a few sub hour 25's, with a PB of 57 mins (53 on a tandem0
    when it all sort of stopped (hence I might have 'moved on')

    Now at 54, I gonna start again ............ OK I've got 15kg to lose,
    but the legs and lungs are still there, and I have the experience to
    train again, and I am not aiming to set the world alight, but another
    sub hour is a nice goal, and if it's not to be, it's not to be ..... I
    still aim to enjoy it though ..... and lose a bit of ballast
    .............

    Go for it guys !!

    Oh just one thing ............ you gotta like pain :)
     
  9. davek

    davek Guest

    Jack Ouzzi wrote:
    > Go for it guys !!


    Thank you for your inspirational comments. :)

    > Oh just one thing ............ you gotta like pain :)


    Getting towards the end of the Surrey Hills ride the other week, I was
    in /serious/ pain and just wanted to find a nice ditch to lie down in
    and die, but as soon as I crossed the finish line I wanted to get out
    and do it all over again. Does that count?

    d.
     
  10. dannyfrankszzz

    dannyfrankszzz New Member

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    Yea, hearing your comments I know exactly what you mean. Sometimes you wonder what on earth you're doing pedalling around like a madman all the time.

    Anyway, I reckon a sub hour 25m TT is within my grasp.
     
  11. Jack Ouzzi

    Jack Ouzzi Guest

    On Sat, 4 Sep 2004 07:18:53 +1000, dannyfrankszzz
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Yea, hearing your comments I know exactly what you mean. Sometimes you
    >wonder what on earth you're doing pedalling around like a madman all
    >the time.
    >
    >Anyway, I reckon a sub hour 25m TT is within my grasp.


    Yep ...... I reckon you have too ............ both you and davek seem
    to have the seeds in your heads, so off you go...

    And dave .......... I have done a couple of Audax rides as well, once
    did a 300k ............ (pre racing days) and wished that I was dead
    !!!

    What a silly stupid distance to ride a bike all in one go (well you
    know what I mean) ...now that WAS pain.....!!

    Na I'll stick to the shorter distances .............. except for
    touring which is a different ball game.

    Good luck!
     
  12. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    dannyfrankszzz wrote:

    > If I wanted to start cycling competitively, what would be the best way
    > of going about this.


    When we first did this, we entered a few open time trials. But I
    wouldn't really advise it, they are very boring. When we took up MTBing
    things got much more fun!

    James
    --
    If I have seen further than others, it is
    by treading on the toes of giants.
    http://www.ne.jp/asahi/julesandjames/home/
     
  13. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    "Jack Ouzzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sat, 4 Sep 2004 07:18:53 +1000, dannyfrankszzz
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >Yea, hearing your comments I know exactly what you mean. Sometimes you
    > >wonder what on earth you're doing pedalling around like a madman all
    > >the time.
    > >
    > >Anyway, I reckon a sub hour 25m TT is within my grasp.

    >
    > Yep ...... I reckon you have too ............ both you and davek seem
    > to have the seeds in your heads, so off you go...
    >
    > And dave .......... I have done a couple of Audax rides as well, once
    > did a 300k ............ (pre racing days) and wished that I was dead
    > !!!
    >
    > What a silly stupid distance to ride a bike all in one go (well you
    > know what I mean) ...now that WAS pain.....!!
    >
    > Na I'll stick to the shorter distances .............. except for
    > touring which is a different ball game.
    >
    > Good luck!


    Horses for courses; I can ride all day (and night if required) just not
    fast. TT's destroyed my enjoyment of cycling, audax has restored it,
    although it's not everyones cup of tea.
     
  14. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Jack Ouzzi
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > On Sat, 4 Sep 2004 07:18:53 +1000, dannyfrankszzz
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>Yea, hearing your comments I know exactly what you mean. Sometimes
    >>you wonder what on earth you're doing pedalling around like a madman
    >>all the time.
    >>
    >>Anyway, I reckon a sub hour 25m TT is within my grasp.

    >
    > Yep ...... I reckon you have too ............ both you and davek seem
    > to have the seeds in your heads, so off you go...


    Curiously, I seem to have committed myself to doing a time trial this
    week. Very strange. Oh well, someone has to be last...

    > And dave .......... I have done a couple of Audax rides as well, once
    > did a 300k ............ (pre racing days) and wished that I was dead


    Now that I do have an ambition to do.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; in faecibus sapiens rheum propagabit
     
  15. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > in message <[email protected]>, Jack Ouzzi
    > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    > > On Sat, 4 Sep 2004 07:18:53 +1000, dannyfrankszzz
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >>
    > >>Yea, hearing your comments I know exactly what you mean. Sometimes
    > >>you wonder what on earth you're doing pedalling around like a madman
    > >>all the time.
    > >>
    > >>Anyway, I reckon a sub hour 25m TT is within my grasp.

    > >
    > > Yep ...... I reckon you have too ............ both you and davek seem
    > > to have the seeds in your heads, so off you go...

    >
    > Curiously, I seem to have committed myself to doing a time trial this
    > week. Very strange. Oh well, someone has to be last...


    That's not so bad, it's more the shame of having you time written up on the
    board (with a minus in my case for your Vet Standard, and even written in
    red ink if they are feeling really mean) ;-(
     
  16. Jack Ouzzi

    Jack Ouzzi Guest

    On Sat, 4 Sep 2004 08:40:18 +0100, "MartinM" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Jack Ouzzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> On Sat, 4 Sep 2004 07:18:53 +1000, dannyfrankszzz
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>


    >> Na I'll stick to the shorter distances .............. except for
    >> touring which is a different ball game.
    >>
    >> Good luck!

    >
    >Horses for courses; I can ride all day (and night if required) just not
    >fast. TT's destroyed my enjoyment of cycling, audax has restored it,
    >although it's not everyones cup of tea.
    >


    Yes exactly right ........ time trials suited me because they were
    over and done with, kept me fit, plus I was able to get back to the
    jobs the wife had waiting for me. :-|

    Touring suited me, because I could do what I wanted to, when I wanted
    to, how I wanted to ...............

    Audax was fine but just really not my cup of tea ............

    When you stop ENJOYING cycling at whatever level, then you may as well
    hang yer bike up!!
     
  17. davek

    davek Guest

    Jack Ouzzi wrote:
    > Yep ...... I reckon you have too ............ both you and davek seem
    > to have the seeds in your heads, so off you go...


    Cheers for the encouragement. I just checked up on the BCF website for a
    local racing club and the nearest one to me appears to be run by an old
    school chum - there's kismet for you.

    > What a silly stupid distance to ride a bike all in one go (well you
    > know what I mean) ...now that WAS pain.....!!


    I've yet to get into the kind of distances done by serious AUKers so I
    can't really comment. When I did my 250km earlier this year I just took
    it nice and easy - didn't finish first ("it's not a race!") but came in
    well within the time limits and though I was very tired and very
    hungry[1] by the end, I wasn't suffering from anything you'd call "pain"
    - not even in the saddle department (thanks to my B17-shaped bum). Hard
    riding over short distances... now that is painful.

    d.

    1. amazingly hungry, despite stopping en route for a hearty lunch /and/
    taking full advantage of the superb catering laid on by the organisers.
     
  18. bugbear

    bugbear Guest

    James Annan wrote:
    > dannyfrankszzz wrote:
    >
    >> If I wanted to start cycling competitively, what would be the best way
    >> of going about this.

    >
    >
    > When we first did this, we entered a few open time trials. But I
    > wouldn't really advise it, they are very boring. When we took up MTBing
    > things got much more fun!


    Horses for courses. Some people find TT'ing boring, other
    people find that all the jumps and bumps of MTB'ing
    stop you getting a nice pedaling rhythm going.

    There's no "right answer"; enjoyment is a personal thing.

    BugBear
     
  19. >Horses for courses. Some people find TT'ing boring, other
    >people find that all the jumps and bumps of MTB'ing
    >stop you getting a nice pedaling rhythm going.
    >
    >There's no "right answer"; enjoyment is a personal thing.
    >
    > BugBear


    Indeedy. For example, offspring Nathan is very, very keen on his time
    trialling, wants to start road races next season and do more track cycling. he
    has absolutely no interest whatsoever in doing any off-road stuff. He's seen
    cyclocross & MTB events, but he has no desire at all in participating in them.
    He's a roadie through & through ;-)

    Cheers, helen s



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  20. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>,
    dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers ('[email protected]') wrote:

    >>Horses for courses. Some people find TT'ing boring, other
    >>people find that all the jumps and bumps of MTB'ing
    >>stop you getting a nice pedaling rhythm going.
    >>
    >>There's no "right answer"; enjoyment is a personal thing.
    >>
    >> BugBear

    >
    > Indeedy. For example, offspring Nathan is very, very keen on his time
    > trialling, wants to start road races next season and do more track
    > cycling. he has absolutely no interest whatsoever in doing any
    > off-road stuff. He's seen cyclocross & MTB events, but he has no
    > desire at all in participating in them. He's a roadie through &
    > through ;-)


    Well, you're right of course that different things suit different folks.
    But of course someone living in Norfolk isn't interested in mountain
    bikes. I am not making slighting reference to your beloved county.
    There isn't much good camel racing to be had here in Galloway, and
    we're a bit short of snow for ski-jumping ever to become popular
    locally.

    And you, frankly, are a bit short of mountains and rocks. This isn't an
    insult either to you or to where you live. If someone were to buy one
    of the kids round here a snow board you wouldn't expect them to be
    hugely excited. There's nowhere to use it. Similarly, where is Nathan
    going to use a mountain bike?

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; MS Windows: A thirty-two bit extension ... to a sixteen bit
    ;; patch to an eight bit operating system originally coded for a
    ;; four bit microprocessor and sold by a two-bit company that
    ;; can't stand one bit of competition -- anonymous
     
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