Cycling in South Devon

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.rides archive' started by GearóId Ó Laoi, Jun 23, 2003.

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  1. I was at a meeting in Thurlestone, South Devon for the weekend and brought a bike. Went for a
    cycle on Saturday afternoon, going over towards South Sands, Salcombe and hither and tither. MY
    GOD. The hills.

    I've been all over France and Spain, Alps, Pyrenees, Ireland and places too numerous to mention.
    I've never come across such steep hills anywhere, one after the other. Scenery was very good, but it
    would want to be!
     
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  2. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    "Gearóid Ó Laoi, Garry Lee" wrote:

    > I was at a meeting in Thurlestone, South Devon for the weekend and brought a bike. Went for a
    > cycle on Saturday afternoon, going over towards South Sands, Salcombe and hither and tither. MY
    > GOD. The hills.
    >
    > I've been all over France and Spain, Alps, Pyrenees, Ireland and places too numerous to mention.
    > I've never come across such steep hills anywhere, one after the other. Scenery was very good, but
    > it would want to be!

    Just remember: life has its up and Downs ;-P Bernie
     
  3. > Just remember: life has its up and Downs

    It has indeed.

    The word Downs, and indeed the word down are very interesting. (Time for some useless information
    folks). Dún in Irish, which was also in old Irish, Gaulish etc. is the root. It means a fort, and
    meant by inference, the place where a fort was, a hill. The Saxons borrowed it and used it to
    mean hill, hence the South Downs. Come from the hill in Saxon was coming a-down, which became
    coming down...

    In Gaulish it was in the name Lú Dhún which is the fort of Lú, a pagan god. Lú Dhún is the original
    name of Lyons.

    Now Lyons is interesting as it is one of the few towns in France which is spelt differently
    in French.

    Lyons = Lyon Reims = Rheims Dunkirk = Dunquerque.

    Maybe there are more.
     
  4. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    "Gearóid Ó Laoi, Garry Lee" wrote:

    > > Just remember: life has its up and Downs
    >
    > It has indeed.
    >
    > The word Downs, and indeed the word down are very interesting. (Time for some useless information
    > folks). Dún in Irish, which was also in old Irish, Gaulish etc. is the root. It means a fort, and
    > meant by inference, the place where a fort was, a hill. The Saxons borrowed it and used it to
    > mean hill, hence the South Downs. Come from the hill in Saxon was coming a-down, which became
    > coming down...
    >
    > In Gaulish it was in the name Lú Dhún which is the fort of Lú, a pagan god. Lú Dhún is the
    > original name of Lyons.
    >
    > Now Lyons is interesting as it is one of the few towns in France which is spelt differently
    > in French.
    >
    > Lyons = Lyon Reims = Rheims Dunkirk = Dunquerque.
    >
    > Maybe there are more.

    There are always more! Language is wonderful. Thank you very much! Sorry I didn't read this sooner,
    I usually hang out at rec.bicycles.misc Bernie
     
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