Cycling related injury. Does anyone know a good doctor.



Status
Not open for further replies.

bfra1

New Member
Nov 24, 2003
45
0
0
I am a road cyclist (In Melbourne), who is riding 100-200 km's P/week mixed between road and stationary trainer.
I have developed a clicking sound under my kneecap and have been doing knee strengthening exercises as recommended by a local Dr.
After consulting a local Physio for a couple of weeks, he advised that if there wasn't any or much pain that it probably wasn't too much to worry about.
This has worried me as something in my knee is not moving how evolution intended.

Does anyone know a Doctor/Physio etc who specialises or is knowlegeable with Cycling related injuries. I will travel almost anywhere in Melbourne for the right advice.

I don't want to have to stop riding longer than neccessary because of lack of urgency on my behalf.
 

Roadie_scum

New Member
Nov 14, 2003
1,288
0
0
Just about anyone at the Olympic Park or Latrobe Medical Centre Sports Medicine Clinics should be good, doctor or physio. Personally, I'd see both if you want to get it sorted out quickly - a sports doctor to deal with initial treatment and rest, and a physio to help w massage and strengthening - ongoing management.
 
H

Hippy

Guest
"bfra1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Does anyone know a Doctor/Physio etc who specialises or is
knowlegeable
> with Cycling related injuries. I will travel almost anywhere in Melbourne for the right advice.

http://www.opsmc.com.au/

Swan Street Melbourne 3004 Phone: (03) 9427 0366

Melbourne Sports & Aquatic Centre, Aughtie Drive Albert Park 3206 Phone: (03) 9682 3011

I don't know how they compare with "normal" doctors but these guys are sports-specific. I went to
the Olympic Park one for my collarbone.

hth hippy
 
J

John Doe

Guest
"bfra1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I am a road cyclist (In Melbourne), who is riding 100-200 km's P/week mixed between road and
> stationary trainer. I have developed a clicking sound under my kneecap and have been doing knee
> strengthening exercises as recommended by a local Dr. After consulting a local Physio for a couple
> of weeks, he advised that if there wasn't any or much pain that it probably wasn't too much to
> worry about. This has worried me as something in my knee is not moving how evolution intended.
>
> Does anyone know a Doctor/Physio etc who specialises or is knowlegeable with Cycling related
> injuries. I will travel almost anywhere in Melbourne for the right advice.
>
> I don't want to have to stop riding longer than neccessary because of lack of urgency on
> my behalf.
>

Just keep asking. Could be a tracking problem with the patella. I asked a truckload of doctors about
the similar thing. Each time I saw a new doctor for something else I would ask. Not painful. Most
said it was degenerative arthritus.One finally said it could be you have a tracking problem. Taping
the patella one way or the other might stop it. Referred me to a physio. Well physio solved the
problem with some tape. I just put up with the clicking mostly but my friends hate it on hill
climbs. Annoys the **** out of them.
 

Roadie_scum

New Member
Nov 14, 2003
1,288
0
0
Originally posted by Hippy
I don't know how they compare with "normal" doctors but these guys are sports-specific. I went to
the Olympic Park one for my collarbone.

I think there are a few differences with sports med doctors. They understand mechanisms of injury that occur in sport better, and have good anatomical and physiological knowledge with respect to areas under a lot of load. They also understand that we want to ride, not sit on the couch. They will tell you to rest if it's required, not just as a precaution, and you know that you can be confident in that instruction. They are also better able to advise on how to proceed back to full volume training, and what cross training you can do to hold condition. That's just a few things - there are others. The value for money factor depends on your personal commitment to sport, and your goals.
 

bfra1

New Member
Nov 24, 2003
45
0
0
Hi guys, Thanks for your help. I went to the Olympic park Sports Medicine centre last night and they were excellent.
Looks like John Doe and I will hear each other on the streets, as mine knee is OK...just noisy.

At least I can ride.
 

Spider1977

New Member
Jul 19, 2003
446
0
0
Originally posted by Roadie_scum
Why on earth would you have a problem with most doctors???

Arrogance, incompetence, solipsistic, boorish, think they are experts on everything, generally regard themselves as god's gift to the world - say no more!

After putting up with med students at Uni and having known quite a few med graduates from school days, it amazes me how they ever got through.

BTW, I have a PhD and my profession has been the butt of "expert" comments from these so called Doctors who have absolutely no expertise in my branch of science. I prefer to call them Medical practitioners.

So that's the background to my original statement.
 

Roadie_scum

New Member
Nov 14, 2003
1,288
0
0
Firstly, I would say that this is a bizzarre place to air your grievances Spider77.

Secondly, why tar all 'medical practitioners' with the same brush? I'll admit, a proportion of them display the attitudes you've described - I would say that this is no larger than the number who display it in the community at large. A lot of doctors devote a lot of their time to working in public hospitals, with limited resources, for less than they could earn elsewhere. This may not be the majority, but for them I'm grateful. Others who've chosen more financially rewarding careers may still be contribute a lot.

It is unfortunate that you have felt slighted by some members of the medical profession, and to some extent, maybe the attitudes you've found may also be held in the profession at large. However, to opine that 'good doctor' is an oxymoron is unhelpful and, frankly, juvenile. Doctors do so much that is obviously good that it almost seems unnecessary for me to list any examples. That they have the same personal failings we all do I don't doubt.

What, pray tell, is your profession? For a start, you had a PhD by age 26, by which time most doctors will not even have qualified as specialists. Some of your comments about the incompetence of your peers at uni sound like either downright jealousy or lack of modesty. Did you apply for med at the end of school?
 

Spider1977

New Member
Jul 19, 2003
446
0
0
Well firstly, it was you who asked about my grievance.

Secondly, how do you work out I got a PhD at 26? FYI I was considerably older.

Thirdly, I'm going for a ride.
 

Roadie_scum

New Member
Nov 14, 2003
1,288
0
0
Originally posted by Spider1977
Well firstly, it was you who asked about my grievance.

Secondly, how do you work out I got a PhD at 26? FYI I was considerably older.

Thirdly, I'm going for a ride.

I don't believe you were requested to bring it up. Your exact words were 'Good Doctor - now there's an oxymoron'. You don't think that invites further inquiry, and was completeley out of context with respect to all preceding posts?

I guessed 26 on the basis of Spider1977, my bad. You still haven't enlightened me as to which reputable profession is so regularly impugned by the menacing medical profession.
 

bfra1

New Member
Nov 24, 2003
45
0
0
A Good Doctor being an Oxymoron????
Let's see, I went to a Doctor,
I left happy with the consultation,
I'm still riding.
= A good Doctor in my book.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

S
Replies
155
Views
3K
UK and Europe
Chris Malcolm
C