Cycling to school

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Dirtylitterboxo, Apr 14, 2004.

  1. Interesting article in local evening rag

    See

    http://www.eveningnews24.co.uk/Content/News/story.asp?datet-
    ime=13+Apr+2004 +11%3A51&tbrand=ENOnline&tCategory=NEWS&cat-
    egory=News&brand=ENOnline&itemi
    d=NOED13+Apr+2004+11%3A52%3A05%3A320

    or

    http://tinyurl.com/3h7fv

    "Congestion plan will hit small schools April 13, 2004 11:51

    EDUCATION bosses have criticised the Government for "moving
    the goalposts" on funding for initiatives aimed at cutting
    school run congestion.

    Last year, millions of pounds were promised to encourage
    pupils to walk or cycle to school rather than rely on
    parents for lifts.

    The Government pledged £5,000 per primary school and
    £10,000 per secondary school to implement travel plans,
    improve safety and buy equipment.

    In all, 52 Norfolk schools met the Government deadline for
    applying for the payout before the end of last month. But
    now the sums available have changed to £3,750 plus £5 per
    pupil for primaries, and £5,000 plus £5 per pupil for
    secondary school.

    Critics argue primaries with fewer than 250 pupils would
    lose out under the new rules. Secondary schools would need
    1,000 pupils or more to make up the shortfall.

    Tony Mulgrew, county spokesman for the National Union of
    Teachers, said: "They are moving the goalposts again.

    "This is another of the Government's endless initiatives
    which they then don't fund.

    "It's typical — they say one thing and then they
    change it later. I think this is a good idea which
    deserves to go ahead.

    "Of course, there are some cases where parents need to
    drive their children to school, but most pupils would be
    better off walking, and there are ways of organising it so
    it does happen."

    Sarah Grainger, a governor who worked on a travel plan for
    pupils at Cringleford First and Middle School, said: "It
    sends out mixed messages. The Government is saying it wants
    to reduce car use and introduce obesity task forces, but the
    message must be consistent.

    "If they do not send out a clear signal of their commitment
    to this scheme it is frustrating for schools that have
    worked so hard to put these plans together.

    "It has been a long haul at Cringleford. We have worked for
    two years to formulate our travel plan, but sometimes it
    seems next to impossible to make any progress.

    "If the Government is serious about improving public health,
    it needs to make the healthy choice the simple choice."

    Green party councillor Adrian Ramsay added: "If the
    Government has promised a certain amount of money and that
    gets changed, it might cause problems if schools are banking
    on receiving a particular sum.

    "It's extremely important to ensure we maximise the number
    of children using alternative travel methods to get to
    school, both for health reasons and to combat congestion."

    Nick Williams, city councillor for Mousehold and former
    governor at Mousehold First School, said: "Some schools
    could well lose out more than others — it depends on the
    size of the roll.

    "Obviously for bigger schools it might be better, but for
    the smaller ones it could affect them adversely.""

    Cheers, helen s

    --This is an invalid email address to avoid spam-- to get
    correct one remove fame & fortune
    h*$el*$$e*nd**$o$ts**i*$*$m*m$o*n*[email protected]$*a$o*l.c**$om$

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    is switched off--
     
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  2. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    Do schools actively shame parents who drive their kids to
    school? Morning assembly would be a good opportunity.

    (Do they still have morning assembly?)

    That won't cost anything.
     
  3. Mseries

    Mseries Guest

    dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers wrote:
    > Interesting article in local evening rag
    >
    > See
    >
    > http://www.eveningnews24.co.uk/Content/News/story.asp?dat-
    > etime=13+Apr+2004 +11%3A51&tbrand=ENOnline&tCategory=NEWS-
    > &category=News&brand=ENOnline&itemi
    > d=NOED13+Apr+2004+11%3A52%3A05%3A320
    >
    >
    But would would they spend the money on ?
     
  4. McBain_v1

    McBain_v1 New Member

    Joined:
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    This sort of duplicity is hardly surprising. The Government can now argue that the larger schools - which are responsible for larger amount of congestion due to higher pupil numbers - will benefit more than under the previous regime, thereby allowing greater inroads to be made in tackling car use and fat kiddies.

    You must also remember that this Government does not want to offend the car lobby too much and so probably thought that a reduction in funding to the smaller, and typically more remote, schools will still allow those pillocks who enjoy driving their 4x4 pollution-pushers to do so, with the safe delivery of their fat brats to school providing a perfect excuse.

    The Government is not serious about child obesity because children cannot vote.

    I agree entirely that there is too little done to get kids out of cars and back onto their own feet or two wheels when it comes to going to school, but with the "intiative overload" that headteachers must be suffering from, it would be nice if just for once there was a clear, consistent and above all sensible message coming from No.10 on this subject...

    ... whether some of the idiotic parents would actually listen is another matter. It's far to easy for some of the fat bastards out there to blame anyone and everyone apart from themselves for their fat and idle lifestyles that they indoctrinate their kids with.

    The "Big Mac" generation needs to say "I'm not "lovin' it" cos being a lard-arse ain't cool :mad:
     
  5. Paul

    Paul Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected]world.co.uk says...
    > Do schools actively shame parents who drive their kids to
    > school? Morning assembly would be a good opportunity.
    >
    > (Do they still have morning assembly?)
    >
    > That won't cost anything.
    >
    >
    >
    Wouldn't work. My yongest is not at the school next door,
    but one a 7 min walk away. The head FREQUENTLY has ago in
    the fornightly news letter about parking in front of school
    because it is dangerous, nad parking is available a 2 min
    walk away. Some parents still park outside school, even on
    fine days. MAny people are just LAZY.
    --
    .paul

    If at first you don't succeed... Skydiving is probably not
    the sport for you.
     
  6. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    MSeries wrote:

    > But would would they spend the money on ?

    Sheffield stands and helmet lockers, usually.

    --
    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after
    posting. http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at
    Washington University
     
  7. Mseries

    Mseries Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
    > MSeries wrote:
    >
    >> But would would they spend the money on ?
    >
    > Sheffield stands and helmet lockers, usually.

    yes of course, I overlooked those as I was thinking of only
    walking not cycling as I only ever walked to school.
     
  8. W K

    W K Guest

    "McBain_v1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > The Government is not serious about child obesity because
    > children cannot vote.

    strange.

    Kids might vote for more chips in school meals, or for
    fat kids to be pushed around by a circle of skinny kids
    until they cry.
     
  9. McBain_v1

    McBain_v1 New Member

    Joined:
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    Ahh those halcyon days of beating up fat kids at school...
     
  10. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    On 14 Apr 2004 09:20:03 GMT, [email protected]
    (dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers) wrote:

    >Interesting article in local evening rag
    >
    >See
    >
    >http://www.eveningnews24.co.uk/Content/News/story.asp?date-
    >time=13+Apr+2004 +11%3A51&tbrand=ENOnline&tCategory=NEWS&c-
    >ategory=News&brand=ENOnline&itemi
    >d=NOED13+Apr+2004+11%3A52%3A05%3A320
    >
    >or
    >
    >http://tinyurl.com/3h7fv
    >
    >"Congestion plan will hit small schools April 13,
    >2004 11:51

    It seems perfectly reasonable that a primary school with 500
    pupils should receive more funding than one with 100 pupils.
     
  11. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    The PSF mentioned:
    > >http://tinyurl.com/3h7fv
    > >
    > >"Congestion plan will hit small schools

    and Gonzalez responded:
    > It seems perfectly reasonable that a primary school
    > with 500 pupils should receive more funding than one
    > with 100 pupils.

    That was my first thought, too. However, I think the
    current funding rules should have been in place and made
    clear from the start. To pledge a certain amount of
    funding, let the schools make plans and then move the
    goalposts really isn't on, IMHO.

    --
    Danny Colyer (the UK company has been laughed out of my reply address)
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/danny/
    Why I like OE6 - http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/danny/misc/oe6.html
    "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." - Thomas Paine
     
  12. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    On Wed, 14 Apr 2004 22:49:45 +0100, "Danny Colyer"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The PSF mentioned:
    >> >http://tinyurl.com/3h7fv
    >> >
    >> >"Congestion plan will hit small schools
    >
    >and Gonzalez responded:
    >> It seems perfectly reasonable that a primary school with
    >> 500 pupils should receive more funding than one with 100
    >> pupils.
    >
    >That was my first thought, too. However, I think the
    >current funding rules should have been in place and made
    >clear from the start. To pledge a certain amount of
    >funding, let the schools make plans and then move the
    >goalposts really isn't on, IMHO.

    I'd be very surprised if the schools are getting the
    money directly from central government. The way it
    usually works is this:

    The government allocate a certain amount of money to local
    education authorities based on its number of primary and
    secondary schools. The LEA then decide how to allocate the
    money to schools. This is usually distributed by a formula
    that allocates a certain amount of cash per school plus an
    amount dependent on the size of the school.

    I suspect that the report is misleading. While it is
    probably true that the Government has pledged (and indeed
    allocated an average of) £5000 per primary and £10,000 per
    secondary school, it is unlikely to have been the Government
    which has allocated the cash to the schools.

    Incidently, parents who choose to drive their pupils to the
    school where I teach receive an annual subsidy of about £70,
    and teachers a subsidy of about £300.

    Parking in the car park is 10p for 10 minutes. Parents can
    apply for a £10 annual permit which allows them to park
    between 8.50am and 9.10 and 3.10pm and 3.30pm during term
    time (about 200 days per year).

    An annual business parking permit is £400, teachers, and
    teachers alone, can apply for a £100 permit.

    I think that it's unfair that I cannot have a similar
    subsidy for cycling to school, and children who walk or
    cycle don't have similar benefits.

    £300 per annum for teachers who walk, cycle or use public
    transport and £70 for pupils. It would work wonders.

    I feel that a letter to Red Ken may be in order.
     
  13. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    "Simonb" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > Do schools actively shame parents who drive their kids to
    > school? Morning assembly would be a good opportunity.

    That would be shaming the kids rather than their parents.

    --
    Dave...
     
  14. Johnb

    Johnb Guest

    paul wrote:
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    > > Do schools actively shame parents who drive their kids
    > > to school? Morning assembly would be a good opportunity.
    > >
    > > (Do they still have morning assembly?)
    > >
    > > That won't cost anything.

    > Wouldn't work. My yongest is not at the school next door,
    > but one a 7 min walk away. The head FREQUENTLY has ago in
    > the fornightly news letter about parking in front of
    > school because it is dangerous, nad parking is available a
    > 2 min walk away. Some parents still park outside school,
    > even on fine days. MAny people are just LAZY.

    Sounds as if its my local school you are talking about.

    Here they have just wooden-posted all the verges to stop
    parents parking on them. They can now only drop off as, if
    they hang about as is their wont, the access roads will
    become a complete standstill :)

    John B
     
  15. Johnb

    Johnb Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" wrote:
    >
    > MSeries wrote:
    >
    > > But would would they spend the money on ?
    >
    > Sheffield stands and helmet lockers, usually.

    Neither of which were needed 'in my day' of cycling to
    school.

    John b
     
  16. Johnb

    Johnb Guest

    Jon Senior wrote:
    >
    > "Dave Kahn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > That would be shaming the kids rather than their
    > > parents.
    >
    > "Mummy. My teacher says that driving me round the
    > corner to school each day is pa...the...tic. What does
    > that mean?"
    >
    > I think s few well chosen words could go a long way
    > towards shaming the parents. Perhaps the chosen form of
    > transportation for each child could be mentioned in
    > Parent's Evenings.

    When my daughter (then 8) questioned a classmate why she was
    driven 150-ish yards to school the tale got back to the
    parent. The result was said parent knocking loudly on our
    front door and aggressively accusing us of allowing our
    daughter to have a go at their's.

    Don't underestimate what crazed responses you may receive.
    Neither parents nor children can do wrong. Ever.

    John B
     
  17. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    JohnB posted ...

    > "Just zis Guy, you know?" wrote:
    >>
    >> MSeries wrote:
    >>
    >>> But would would they spend the money on ?
    >>
    >> Sheffield stands and helmet lockers, usually.
    >
    > Neither of which were needed 'in my day' of cycling
    > to school.

    Days have changed ..

    'In my day' we didn't need to lock them anywhere ... and
    they'd still be there when we returned, not vandakised
    beyond repair.

    --
    Paul

    (8(|) Homer rocks .. ;)
     
  18. Paul

    Paul Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > paul wrote:
    > >
    > > In article
    > > <[email protected]>,
    > > [email protected] says...
    > > > Do schools actively shame parents who drive their kids
    > > > to school? Morning assembly would be a good
    > > > opportunity.
    > > >
    > > > (Do they still have morning assembly?)
    > > >
    > > > That won't cost anything.
    >
    > > Wouldn't work. My yongest is not at the school next
    > > door, but one a 7 min walk away. The head FREQUENTLY
    > > has ago in the fornightly news letter about parking in
    > > front of school because it is dangerous, nad parking
    > > is available a 2 min walk away. Some parents still
    > > park outside school, even on fine days. MAny people
    > > are just LAZY.
    >
    > Sounds as if its my local school you are talking about.
    >
    > Here they have just wooden-posted all the verges to stop
    > parents parking on them. They can now only drop off as, if
    > they hang about as is their wont, the access roads will
    > become a complete standstill :)
    >
    > John B
    >
    We have wooden posts along the opposit side of the road to
    toe school, but that's to stop impatient motorists from
    mounting the pavemewnt and running children over. It took
    such an event to convince the council that it was money well
    spent though :(

    --
    .paul

    If at first you don't succeed... Skydiving is probably not
    the sport for you.
     
  19. Johnb

    Johnb Guest

    > JohnB posted ...
    >
    > > "Just zis Guy, you know?" wrote:
    > >>
    > >> MSeries wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> But would would they spend the money on ?
    > >>
    > >> Sheffield stands and helmet lockers, usually.
    > >
    > > Neither of which were needed 'in my day' of cycling to
    > > school.
    >
    > Days have changed ..
    >
    > 'In my day' we didn't need to lock them anywhere ... and
    > they'd still be there when we returned, not vandakised
    > beyond repair.

    What was a lock?

    John B
     
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