Cycling Warfare

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Richard, Mar 30, 2003.

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  1. Richard

    Richard Guest

    In light of recent events in Iraq does anybody have any idea if the British Military have any use
    for Bicycles in warfare. I know the Americans have several military bike units. Can anybody tell me
    if these have been or are being used in the current conflict. Thanks Richard
     
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  2. "Richard" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > In light of recent events in Iraq does anybody have any idea if the
    British
    > Military have any use for Bicycles in warfare.

    I like the idea of a bike with a handlebar mounted missile system to get revenge on the next car
    that cuts me up on a roundabout!
     
  3. news:[email protected]...
    > In light of recent events in Iraq does anybody have any idea if the
    British
    > Military have any use for Bicycles in warfare. I know the Americans have several military bike
    > units. Can anybody tell me if these have been or are being used in the current conflict.
    > Thanks Richard

    I take it you haven't done much riding on sand then?

    K
     
  4. Scatterbunny

    Scatterbunny Guest

    Richard wrote:

    > In light of recent events in Iraq does anybody have any idea if the
    British
    > Military have any use for Bicycles in warfare. I know the Americans have several military bike
    > units. Can anybody tell me if these have been or are being used in the current conflict.

    Highly unlikely. But I'll tell you one thing: if the military invested a whole load of expensive
    research and development into bicycles, 100 years overdue we'd finally have puncture-free tyres
    overnight!

    --

    Scatterbunny ~..~ ( ' )
     
  5. Scatterbunny wrote:

    >Highly unlikely. But I'll tell you one thing: if the military invested a whole load of expensive
    >research and development into bicycles, 100 years overdue we'd finally have puncture-free tyres
    >overnight!
    >
    Don't need the army for that! Vredestein Dutch Perfect are almost bullet-proof. Heard the other day
    that the Swiss have finally disbanded their last bicycle unit, wouldn't know if anybody else still
    have any (well, there's a few military bicycle bands left, IIRC)

    As for mounting anti car missiles: a smallish flame thrower should really be sufficient, just melt
    their tires to the pavement ...

    Mark van Gorkom.
     
  6. John Hearns

    John Hearns Guest

    On Sun, 30 Mar 2003 21:21:42 +0000, Mark van Gorkom wrote:

    > Scatterbunny wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Highly unlikely. But I'll tell you one thing: if the military invested a whole load of expensive
    >>research and development into bicycles, 100 years overdue we'd finally have puncture-free tyres
    >>overnight!
    >>
    > Don't need the army for that! Vredestein Dutch Perfect are almost bullet-proof. Heard the other
    > day that the Swiss have finally disbanded their last bicycle unit, wouldn't know if anybody else
    > still have any (well, there's a few military bicycle bands left, IIRC)
    >
    Is this true?

    I visited the Swiss Expo '02 last year. Think of it as the Millenium Dome exhibition - but done by
    the Swiss. So lots of rail transport, and excellent organisation.

    At one of the venues there was an exhibition put on by the military. They had bicycles for loan -
    sadly I didn't try one. They were really heavy steel framed bikes, with leather saddlebags and the
    like. And of course painted green. There was also horse and buggy rides laid on. Pity the poor
    squaddie I saw sent out with a shovel and bucket...

    I guess I won't contradict you though - it may very well be that the last combat unit is no longer
    reliant on bikes. But I seriously doubt if the Swiss Army have totally done away with their bikes.
     
  7. Tim Dunne

    Tim Dunne Guest

    "Mark van Gorkom" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Don't need the army for that! Vredestein Dutch Perfect are almost bullet-proof.

    I'll tentatively second that. Been using them for a month, and it's the longest I've been without a
    puncture at this time of year (up here they cut the hawthorn hedges about now which leaves a lovely
    coating of sharp thorns on the road - why can't they do something about that?)

    Tim

    --
    Sent from Brum, UK... ...scheduled completion Sept 2003 'What's keeping the White House white? Is it
    chalk, is it fog, is it fear?' Steve Skaith, 'America For Beginners' Look, mum, an anorak on a bike!
    Check out www.nervouscyclist.org
     
  8. Terry J

    Terry J Guest

    Now see this, by the left, quick pedal http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/5265/atb.htm

    > >>Highly unlikely. But I'll tell you one thing: if the military invested
    a
    > >>whole load of expensive research and development into bicycles, 100
    years
    > >>overdue we'd finally have puncture-free tyres overnight!
     
  9. ChrisW

    ChrisW New Member

    Joined:
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    Some years ago, driving cautiously down into Switzerland from, IIRC, the St Bernard pass, we met a squad of Swiss soldiers cycling up.

    Their bikes looked like everything you'd expect from the expression "army bicycle" - greenish, heavy, three gears, moustache handlebars.

    I'm not surprised Switzerland never gets invaded. These guys must have been tough enough to push a tank over.

    Chris Walker

     
  10. W K

    W K Guest

    "Tim Dunne" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Mark van Gorkom" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > Don't need the army for that! Vredestein Dutch Perfect are almost bullet-proof.
    >
    > I'll tentatively second that.

    Did you see the letter in C+ from a bloke in northern ireland saying his "bomb proof" tyres were in
    fact punctured by shrapnell.
     
  11. Scatterbunny

    Scatterbunny Guest

    "Mark van Gorkom" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Don't need the army for that! Vredestein Dutch Perfect are almost bullet-proof.

    Tell me more! Do they come in 700x23C?

    --

    Scatterbunny ~..~ ( ' )
     
  12. Scatterbunny

    Scatterbunny Guest

    "ChrisW" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Some years ago, driving cautiously down into Switzerland from, IIRC, the St Bernard pass, we met a
    > squad of Swiss soldiers cycling up.
    >
    > Their bikes looked like everything you'd expect from the expression "army bicycle" - greenish,
    > heavy, three gears, moustache handlebars.
    >
    > I'm not surprised Switzerland never gets invaded. These guys must have been tough enough to push a
    > tank over.

    Of course, if you really want to admire Swiss Army cycling tactics you should read the history of
    their tandem & sidecar Gattling gun squads. These three-man teams operated mainly on the St
    Gotthard pass, where they could get a good run-up around Lake Lucerne before standing on the pedals
    to ascend the pass.

    The Gattling gun was mounted on the rear handlebars (obviously raised as high as possible to avoid
    shooting the man at the front) and the ammo belt was fed by the man in the sidecar. Unfortunately,
    due to the 40-mile downhill run on the other side of the St Gotthard pass, most units ended up in
    Italy and couldn't be bothered cycling home, so the whole squadron was scrapped.
    --

    Scatterbunny ~..~ ( ' )
     
  13. Wasn't entirely certain; heard it on the radio about one/two months ago. Just checked the Swiss army
    newssite <www.armee.ch > and there's a speech about downsizing the army. In short: several elements
    will be disbanded entirely, incl. the bicycle batallions (battalions sounds impressive! Imagine
    being overrun by a few hundred cyclists wooshing down the nearest alp...). OTOH they'll keep the
    mules and horses.

    Mark van Gorkom.

    >> Heard the other day that the Swiss have finally disbanded their last bicycle unit, wouldn't know
    >> if anybody else still have any (well, there's a few military bicycle bands left, IIRC)
    >>
    >Is this true?

    >I guess I won't contradict you though - it may very well be that the last combat unit is no longer
    >reliant on bikes. But I seriously doubt if the Swiss Army have totally done away with their bikes.
     
  14. "Adrian Boliston" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > I like the idea of a bike with a handlebar mounted missile system to get revenge on the next car
    > that cuts me up on a roundabout!

    I recommend a chinese RPG-7

    http://www.g2mil.com/RPG.htm

    definitely not the accessory for the weight-weenies among you. But when you absolutely, positively
    MUST show White Van Man who's boss...

    -Luigi engage the enemy more closely
     
  15. In one of Leonard Liggio's lectures on history he recounted the use of bicycles in the invasion of
    Singapore and by the N. Viets.
     
  16. "Adrian Boliston" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Richard" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > In light of recent events in Iraq does anybody have any idea if the
    > British
    > > Military have any use for Bicycles in warfare.
    >
    > I like the idea of a bike with a handlebar mounted missile system to get revenge on the next car
    > that cuts me up on a roundabout!

    Sounds like something straight out of a Bond film; "Now pay attention, 007...." ;-)

    David E. Belcher

    Dept. of Chemistry, University of York
     
  17. "Robert Goodman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > In one of Leonard Liggio's lectures on history he recounted the use of bicycles in the invasion of
    > Singapore and by the N. Viets.

    Was waiting for someone to bring that up; the uses were very different.

    The Japanese used bicycles as a means of infantry transport--(no surprise; the germans did as well)
    and were thus able to make exceptional time down the Malayan peninsula.

    The North Vietnamese used them as a means of supplying troops; often, bicycles were so laden with
    supplies that they were used more as (remarkably efficient) wheelbarrows rather than being ridden.

    And somewhere I remember seeing a great picture of an Afghan fighter riding a Raleigh-knockoff
    roadster, slinging an RPG, on his way to or from a fight.

    -Luigi
     
  18. On 3 Apr 2003 04:05:31 -0800, [email protected] (Luigi de Guzman) wrote:

    >"Robert Goodman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:<[email protected]>...
    >> In one of Leonard Liggio's lectures on history he recounted the use of bicycles in the invasion
    >> of Singapore and by the N. Viets.
    >
    >Was waiting for someone to bring that up; the uses were very different.
    >
    >The Japanese used bicycles as a means of infantry transport--(no surprise; the germans did as well)
    >and were thus able to make exceptional time down the Malayan peninsula.
    >
    >The North Vietnamese used them as a means of supplying troops; often, bicycles were so laden with
    >supplies that they were used more as (remarkably efficient) wheelbarrows rather than being ridden.
    >
    >And somewhere I remember seeing a great picture of an Afghan fighter riding a Raleigh-knockoff
    >roadster, slinging an RPG, on his way to or from a fight.
    >
    >-Luigi

    Look in Antony Beevor's recent book, "Belin" for pictures of cycling anti-tank patrols. The
    pictures show each bike with a Panzerfaust each side of the fork; for transit only. Didn't save
    Berlin, though.
     
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