Cyclings new killer app - as a business training tool

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by cfsmtb, Apr 6, 2006.

  1. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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    Cyclings new killer app - as a business training tool.
    :D :D

    *****************************
    SMH: Keep pushing and you will conquer that hill
    http://businessnetwork.smh.com.au/articles/2006/04/06/4372.html
    Friday, 7 April 2006

    A good idea alone is not enough to be successful, says Mr Allardyce.

    Even if your company sometimes feels as if it is going under, you must never give up, says Ross Allardyce, avid cyclist and chief executive officer of software development company Beethoven Computer Services.

    Cycling with Bicycle Victoria around some tough country trails has taught Mr Allardyce, 61, that perseverance wins. "Even when you're exhausted you have to just keep pushing. Sometimes in your career, through the difficult times you just have to put your head down and keep ploughing forward."

    It was one of those difficult times for Mr Allardyce (pictured) when he decided to keep the software development side of Beethoven and sell off the profitable networking part of the business in 2000, losing $8 million in annual revenue.

    "We struggled for a good year and a half to make ends meet and continue the development and sales efforts. Our perseverance traits kicked in. The idea was to focus all our energies on Resolve (now its flagship customer-management software product), and ultimately to live or die by it. It's our speciality, and we know the market very well."

    But a good idea alone is not enough to be successful, says Mr Allardyce. "Lots of people in IT have really good ideas but they approach business from a technical point of view and neglect the sales and marketing functions."

    Having cut his technical teeth in California's Silicon Valley in the 1970s and '80s, Mr Allardyce learnt about sales and marketing the hard way when he started his own company, Advanced Software Technique, where he developed software that monitored and corrected IBM mainframe operating systems.

    He was the technical expert in the company so he teamed with an ex-IBM salesman to take care of sales and marketing functions. This turned out to be a mistake but it taught Mr Allardyce how to run a business. "He couldn't or wouldn't do the work. That eventually drove me to run the back office of the business. I walked in as a techo and walked out a business manager. I also learnt to thoroughly research the people you hire."

    Mr Allardyce has made "tons of mistakes" in business. "What I've learnt from my mistakes is to treat each one as a learning experience and never make the same mistake again," he says.

    Now Mr Allardyce is more conservative. He plans to expand Beethoven into the US, but is starting small by expanding into New Zealand first so the company can practise with a "small and controllable market".

    Last week Beethoven signed on New Zealand IT consultants Simpl to maintain and expand its customer base there, before it ventures into bigger markets.

    His years in software development have taught Mr Allardyce not to guide product development by what a single customer tells you, no matter how important that customer is. "I've learnt it is better to have a set of standards to work to and then listen to all your customers. If you get it right, your product will improve exponentially."

    If customers complain, listen to them, he says. "A complaint is a gift. It is an opportunity to talk with one of your customers. It lets you fix the mistake and show them how good you are. If you handle it professionally and efficiently, you can turn the complainer into someone who will buy again. Show that you are an organisation that has good customer-service skills and turn someone who has a complaint into a re-purchaser."

    Mr Allardyce learnt a lot about running a business from his friend and mentor, Bob Watson, who successfully expanded a small recruiting company.

    "I admire his work ethic and absolute dedication to the job at hand. He would focus on a task and get it done. He showed me that hard work, dedication and smarts are invaluable and with those attributes you can do anything."

    Mr Allardyce keeps up his smarts by cycling, which keeps him fit and ready to navigate his way through the next business decision. "When I ride into the city, I already feel good. My brain works better and I can feel I can handle anything. I have more energy."

    NEXT LESSONS

    · If you are confident in your product or service, be persistent and persevere during the tough times.

    · A great idea isn't enough: you need sales and marketing.

    · Don't make the same mistake twice.

    · Research the people you hire.

    · A customer complaint is a gift. Show them how good you are when you deal with it.

    Cynthia Karena
     
    Tags:


  2. gplama

    gplama Well-Known Member

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    yawn/yuck... talk about company advertisement with a pinch of "hes a cyclist, that explains it!".. let me reword this around a topic other than cycling...


    Poop stops around some tough country out houses has taught Mr Allardyce, 61, that perseverance wins. "Even when you're exhausted you have to just keep pushing. Sometimes in your career, through the difficult times you just have to put your head down and keep ploughing forward."

    Mr Allardyce keeps up his smarts by pushing hard on the out house, which keeps him fit and ready to navigate his way through the next business decision. "When I poop before going into the city, I already feel good. My brain works better and I can feel I can handle anything. I have more energy."


    crap on!
    GPL :)
     
  3. AndrewJ

    AndrewJ Guest

    Yup.

    I reckon the over 50's divide into two groups.

    Group A : Those who can remember what they were thinking in their 20's
    as "Mr over 50" prattled on about the "keys to success".

    Group BSA : Those who cannot remember, and as a consequence blather on
    endlessly about what wonderful people they are.

    As Yoda would be putting it: time for shutting up, there is.
     
  4. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch New Member

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    bahahahahahahah. Lama gets 'Post of the day' nomination :D
     
  5. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    AndrewJ wrote:

    > I reckon the over 50's divide into two groups.
    >
    > Group A : Those who can remember what they were thinking in their 20's
    > as "Mr over 50" prattled on about the "keys to success".
    >
    > Group BSA : Those who cannot remember, and as a consequence blather on
    > endlessly about what wonderful people they are.


    That's a bit harsh on the over 50's. Some of us remember.... something.

    You can also divide the under 25's into two groups.
    Group A: Those that can't think.
    Group B: Those that don't.

    :)

    Theo
     
  6. cfsmtb wrote:
    >> I walked in as a techo and walked out a business manager.


    As lama said, the standard business promotion form article. The above
    line is really the only thing you need to take on board if you are
    considering a business.

    There are three aspects you need to master equally to be successfull;
    1) the techo knowledge; every business has it (Hint, best learnt at
    someone elses expense)

    2) how to sell your product. You need customers clients, etc.

    He mentioned the above two, but not the blood sucker of a third.

    3) The book keeping. It is really worthwhile to learn enough to flick
    off your accountant and do your own BAS, Tax, etc. Yes, I don't like
    accountants because most of them are one trick ponies that only vaguley
    know their field.
     
  7. Theo Bekkers wrote:

    > You can also divide the under 25's into THREE groups.
    > Group A: Those that can't think.
    > Group B: Those that don't.

    Group C: Those who think they can do everything, but can not.
     
  8. In aus.bicycle on Fri, 7 Apr 2006 09:16:30 +0800
    Theo Bekkers <[email protected]> wrote:
    > AndrewJ wrote:
    >
    >> I reckon the over 50's divide into two groups.
    >>
    >> Group A : Those who can remember what they were thinking in their 20's
    >> as "Mr over 50" prattled on about the "keys to success".
    >>
    >> Group BSA : Those who cannot remember, and as a consequence blather on
    >> endlessly about what wonderful people they are.

    >
    > That's a bit harsh on the over 50's. Some of us remember.... something.
    >


    BSAs presumably.

    Zebee
     
  9. DaveB

    DaveB Guest

    Zebee Johnstone wrote:
    >>
    >>That's a bit harsh on the over 50's. Some of us remember.... something.
    >>

    >
    >
    > BSAs presumably.
    >


    Now that's definitely harsh. My first road bike as a teenager was a BSA
    and I'm well under 50. I wonder whatever happened to that bike??

    DaveB
     
  10. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    DaveB wrote:
    > Zebee Johnstone wrote:
    >> Theo wrote


    >>> That's a bit harsh on the over 50's. Some of us remember....
    >>> something.


    >> BSAs presumably.


    > Now that's definitely harsh. My first road bike as a teenager was a
    > BSA and I'm well under 50. I wonder whatever happened to that bike??


    My first motorcycle was a BSA and Zebee knew that. :)

    Theo
     
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