Cyclist killed in South Wales

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Keith Willoughby, May 31, 2004.

  1. A cyclist, on leave from Iraq, has been killed just down the road from
    me.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/3763591.stm

    The road in question, up to Eglwysilan, is one I've cycled a few times,
    and is one that has a couple of chevrons mentioned elsewhere on the
    group. Last time I came down it, past the Griffin Mill garage mentioned
    in the article, I was doing 30mph+. I might have second thoughts next
    time :(

    (Aside: no mentions of helmets, either way. Might be a first for a BBC
    article)

    --
    Keith Willoughby http://flat222.org/keith/
    01 811 8055
     
    Tags:


  2. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 1/6/04 12:10 am, in article [email protected], "Keith
    Willoughby" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > A cyclist, on leave from Iraq, has been killed just down the road from
    > me.

    <snip>
    > (Aside: no mentions of helmets, either way. Might be a first for a BBC
    > article)


    It also hints that he may have been somewhat inebriated at the time as well.
    Riding down steep hills in the dark when merry is a recipe for mishap.
     
  3. On Tue, 01 Jun 2004 10:00:28 +0100, David Martin wrote:

    > On 1/6/04 12:10 am, in article [email protected], "Keith
    > Willoughby" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> A cyclist, on leave from Iraq, has been killed just down the road from
    >> me.

    > <snip>
    >> (Aside: no mentions of helmets, either way. Might be a first for a BBC
    >> article)

    >
    > It also hints that he may have been somewhat inebriated at the time as well.
    > Riding down steep hills in the dark when merry is a recipe for mishap.


    Even in Wales it's not dark at 15:45 on a May afternoon. Actually, Wales
    is further west than many other parts of the country so lighting up times
    are later.

    I suppose you believe that the reference to him being in a pub is a hint
    that he was 'somewhat inebriated'. Wouldn't the journalist have written
    something a bit stronger if s/he really thought that alcohol had been a
    contributing factor? Something like, "Mr Prosser had been drinking at the
    Rose and Crown pub ...."?
    --
    Michael MacClancy
    Random putdown - "I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter
    saying I approved of it." - Mark Twain
    www.macclancy.demon.co.uk
    www.macclancy.co.uk
     
  4. vernon levy

    vernon levy Guest


    > A cyclist, on leave from Iraq, has been killed just down the road from
    > me.


    Yes but is it truly newsworthy? Does the link with Iraq make it more
    newsworthy?

    At times this newsgroup reminds me of my mother's pre-occupation with the
    'hatches, matches and despatches' column of the local newspaper. Every
    phone conversation that I had with her was peppered with: the latest deaths
    of folk that I either never knew but:
    I met them once as a babe in arms
    or
    they were related to the local fishmongers first wife's second family
    or
    they were a third cousin thrice removed
    or
    they were 'only 87'
    or
    some other engineered link to relevance

    Is it really necessary to post every death no matter how tenuous the link to
    cycling, cycling helmets, people who ride bikes and cyclists? It sure makes
    for a maudling atmosphere at time and I'm sure makes cycling appear to be
    far more hazardous than it is.
     
  5. Dene Wilby

    Dene Wilby Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...

    > (Aside: no mentions of helmets, either way. Might be a first for a BBC
    > article)


    I'm definitely 'pro helmet' but I bet he WAS wearing a lid which is why
    it wasn't reported.

    D
     
  6. vernon levy wrote:

    >> A cyclist, on leave from Iraq, has been killed just down the road from
    >> me.

    >
    > Yes but is it truly newsworthy? Does the link with Iraq make it more
    > newsworthy?


    [...]

    > Is it really necessary to post every death no matter how tenuous the link to
    > cycling, cycling helmets, people who ride bikes and cyclists? It sure makes
    > for a maudling atmosphere at time and I'm sure makes cycling appear to be
    > far more hazardous than it is.


    I posted it because it was on a road that I was talking about on here as
    recently as Saturday, posessing as it does some Serious Slope, and that
    I described my cycling up a couple of months ago. In fact, it was on
    the road that he died on that I first broke 30 MPH.

    --
    Keith Willoughby http://flat222.org/keith/
    "Football's just a branch of science"
     
  7. Al C-F

    Al C-F Guest

    On Tue, 1 Jun 2004 11:27:40 +0100, Michael MacClancy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I suppose you believe that the reference to him being in a pub is a hint
    >that he was 'somewhat inebriated'.


    It is usual that Pongo + Pub = Pissed.

    Though it is accepted that this is not explicitly stated for this
    instance.

    Extending the case:

    Pongo + Pub + Cycle + Steep Hill(down) = Potential for Disaster.

    Potential realised in this instance.
    --

    Cheers,

    Al
     
  8. On Wed, 02 Jun 2004 09:55:08 +0100, Al C-F wrote:

    > On Tue, 1 Jun 2004 11:27:40 +0100, Michael MacClancy
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I suppose you believe that the reference to him being in a pub is a hint
    >>that he was 'somewhat inebriated'.

    >
    > It is usual that Pongo + Pub = Pissed.
    >
    > Though it is accepted that this is not explicitly stated for this
    > instance.
    >
    > Extending the case:
    >
    > Pongo + Pub + Cycle + Steep Hill(down) = Potential for Disaster.
    >
    > Potential realised in this instance.


    Yes, but my hypothesis was that:

    Pongo + Cycle + Steep Hill(down) = Potential for Disaster

    .... is a sufficient condition.

    Potential also realised in this instance. ;-)

    --
    Michael MacClancy
    Random putdown - "I've had a perfectly wonderful evening. But this wasn't
    it." -Groucho Marx
    www.macclancy.demon.co.uk
    www.macclancy.co.uk
     
  9. Al C-F

    Al C-F Guest

    On Wed, 2 Jun 2004 10:27:57 +0100, Michael MacClancy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Wed, 02 Jun 2004 09:55:08 +0100, Al C-F wrote:
    >
    >> On Tue, 1 Jun 2004 11:27:40 +0100, Michael MacClancy
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I suppose you believe that the reference to him being in a pub is a hint
    >>>that he was 'somewhat inebriated'.

    >>
    >> It is usual that Pongo + Pub = Pissed.
    >>
    >> Though it is accepted that this is not explicitly stated for this
    >> instance.
    >>
    >> Extending the case:
    >>
    >> Pongo + Pub + Cycle + Steep Hill(down) = Potential for Disaster.
    >>
    >> Potential realised in this instance.

    >
    >Yes, but my hypothesis was that:
    >
    >Pongo + Cycle + Steep Hill(down) = Potential for Disaster
    >
    >... is a sufficient condition.
    >
    >Potential also realised in this instance. ;-)


    Of course, you're right that in the general case 'Pub' is not a
    necessary condition for 'Potential for Disaster', but in this case,
    'Pub' had already been entered into the equation by the newspaper
    report.

    So the general case of:
    Pongo + Pub = Pissed
    had already been satisfied.

    Thus:
    Pissed + Cycle + Steep Hill (down) = Potential for Disaster(Realised)

    Now, we may care to identify which of the conditions remaining is
    necessary; though I do not believe that any of the terms if sufficent
    on its own.

    I would argue that
    Cycle + Steep Hill (does not equal) Potential for Disaster
    without added conditions such as
    Blinding Incompetence;
    Poor Cycle Maintenance;
    Catastrophic Failure;
    or External Influence.


    ....to be continued for 94 more posts.
    --

    Cheers,

    Al
     
  10. Al C-F wrote:

    > So the general case of:
    > Pongo + Pub = Pissed
    > had already been satisfied.


    It's worth pointing out that the Rose and Crown isn't somewhere you go
    to get pissed. It is on the top of a very steep hill, after all. It's
    more well known round these parts for its Sunday dinners, and given
    that the accident happened at 15:45 on a Sunday afternoon, it's quite
    likely they'd been for food, rather than beer.

    --
    Keith Willoughby http://flat222.org/keith/
    What ain't we got? We ain't got mates
     
  11. Aloysius

    Aloysius Guest

    Keith Willoughby <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Al C-F wrote:
    >
    > > So the general case of:
    > > Pongo + Pub = Pissed
    > > had already been satisfied.

    >
    > It's worth pointing out that the Rose and Crown isn't somewhere you go
    > to get pissed. It is on the top of a very steep hill, after all. It's
    > more well known round these parts for its Sunday dinners, and given
    > that the accident happened at 15:45 on a Sunday afternoon, it's quite
    > likely they'd been for food, rather than beer.


    Ah, so there is an alternative construct for this special case:

    Pongo + Pub = Sunday lunch and Half a Shandy.

    Well, I suppose it IS a possibility...
     
  12. James Hodson

    James Hodson Guest

    On 4 Jun 2004 04:59:29 -0700,
    [email protected] (Aloysius) wrote:

    >Pongo


    Hi Aloysius

    Got to ask, what's a pongo?

    James
     
  13. Tim Hall

    Tim Hall Guest

    On Fri, 04 Jun 2004 16:54:11 +0100, James Hodson
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 4 Jun 2004 04:59:29 -0700,
    >[email protected] (Aloysius) wrote:
    >
    >>Pongo

    >
    >Hi Aloysius
    >
    >Got to ask, what's a pongo?
    >


    Forces(?) slang for soldier. Less derogatory,imho, than squaddie.



    Tim
     
  14. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Sat, 05 Jun 2004 00:24:21 +0100 someone who may be Tim Hall
    <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >>Got to ask, what's a pongo?

    >
    >Forces(?) slang for soldier. Less derogatory,imho, than squaddie.


    During the Second World War army officers got fed up of being called
    pongos and complained. As a result the RAF issued an order that said
    something like, "In future army officers are to be referred to as
    army officers and nothing else." The RN was more succinct. Their
    order stated, "In future pongos will be referred to as army
    officers."


    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E
    I will always explain revoked keys, unless the UK government
    prevents me using the RIP Act 2000.
     
  15. James Hodson

    James Hodson Guest

    On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 10:52:35 +0100, David Hansen
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>>Got to ask, what's a pongo?

    >>
    >>Forces(?) slang for soldier. Less derogatory,imho, than squaddie.

    >
    >During the Second World War army officers got fed up of being called
    >pongos and complained. As a result the RAF issued an order that said
    >something like, "In future army officers are to be referred to as
    >army officers and nothing else." The RN was more succinct. Their
    >order stated, "In future pongos will be referred to as army
    >officers."


    Ta, both.

    When I was feeling a bit down in the dumps a while ago a mate of mine
    delivered a large box full of large airport departure-style novels.
    I'm currently reading one of these called Dark Rose which is about the
    Paletinians invading Ireland.

    In the bath this morning I read a paragraph that reminded me of this
    pongo business.

    "Fucking gits," the other officer muttered, moving a piece on the
    board. The Navy, delighted delighted with the fictional Captain
    Blackadder's terse remark: 'I don't care how many times they go
    upiddy-up-up, they are still gits!', had overnight labelled all their
    helicopter pilots with the tag, and every time something went wrong
    with a helicopter it was always the gits' fault."

    Totally OT
    James
     
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