Cyclist Memorials

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by powinc, May 1, 2004.

  1. powinc

    powinc New Member

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    I was driving through the Hunter Region recently and quickly saw a bike frame with (I think) two crosses displayed above it.

    This is obviously a memorial to one (or two) cycles that died on that part of the road. It was erected just before a bridge, where the emergency lane/bike lane narrows to cross the bridge.

    I believe as a group we make a effort to memorialize, or pay tribute to all cyclists that have died on our roads. Either by erecting a memorial where they have been killed or in a memorial park in each capital city or both.

    powinc
     
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  2. "powinc" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I was driving through the Hunter Region recently and
    > quickly saw a bike frame with (I think) two crosses
    > displayed above it.
    >
    > This is obviously a memorial to one (or two) cycles that
    > died on that part of the road. It was erected just before
    > a bridge, where the emergency lane/bike lane narrows to
    > cross the bridge.
    >
    > I believe as a group we make a effort to memorialize, or
    > pay tribute to all cyclists that have died on our roads.
    > Either by erecting a memorial where they have been killed
    > or in a memorial park in each capital city or both.
    >
    > powinc

    About 10 km south of where I live (Smiths Hill near Collie,
    Western Australia) there is a small memorial dedicated to
    two cyclists who's ashes were scattered at the hill. They
    died of natural causes but the memorial is dedicated to them
    for their cycling feats. We also have a long tiled snake
    that represents the Wagyl set into the footpath of the main
    street. Tiles set into the snakes form have the names of the
    winners of the Collie -Donnybrook cycle race which extends
    back about 77 years. At the end is a large tiled apple which
    represents Donnybrook, the home of the Granny Smith and Pink
    Lady apples. The snake is about 100 metres long.

    Marty
     
  3. L'Acrobat

    L'Acrobat Guest

    "powinc" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I was driving through the Hunter Region recently and
    > quickly saw a bike frame with (I think) two crosses
    > displayed above it.
    >
    > This is obviously a memorial to one (or two) cycles that
    > died on that part of the road. It was erected just before
    > a bridge, where the emergency lane/bike lane narrows to
    > cross the bridge.
    >
    > I believe as a group we make a effort to memorialize, or
    > pay tribute to all cyclists that have died on our roads.
    > Either by erecting a memorial where they have been killed
    > or in a memorial park in each capital city or both.

    I can see the point to a roadside memorial as, if done
    right, may make drivers more aware of cyclists (if only in
    the general area of the memorial).

    But a memorial park in each capital city is absurd, do we
    need a memorial park in each capital for those killed in
    toaster accidents? drowned in the bath park? died of bee
    stings? snakebite? medical negligence? abseiling accidents?
    rock fishing accidents?

    We don't need a park for every trivial (percentage of deaths
    wise) case - who would be expected to pay for this country
    wide network of 'dead cyclist' parks? the local rate payer?,
    state govt? or would it be a federal responsibility? in
    every single case the one who actually pays is the taxpayer,
    and I for one would be bloody angry if my tax money was
    diverted to such a cause (yes I know it already goes to
    equally stupid ideas, but why come up with more?).
     
  4. wassupdawg

    wassupdawg New Member

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    If, as pointed out by cfsmtb (quoting Phil Crohn) that more people have died on our roads last century than in all wars combined, then perhaps the park/memorial idea has legs. After all, how many shrines, memorial plaques etc does every town, city, location have?
    could incoroporate them into those naff Lion's club parks in every town
     
  5. L'Acrobat

    L'Acrobat Guest

    "wassupdawg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]r.com...
    > L'Acrobat wrote:
    > > I can see the point to a roadside memorial as, if done
    > > right, may make drivers more aware of cyclists (if
    > > only in the general area of the memorial). But a
    > > memorial park in each capital city is absurd, do we
    > > need a memorial park in each capital for those killed
    > > in toaster accidents? drowned in the bath park? died
    > > of bee stings? snakebite? medical negligence?
    > > abseiling accidents? rock fishing accidents? We don't
    > > need a park for every trivial (percentage of deaths
    > > wise)
    case
    > > - who would be expected to pay for this country wide
    > > network of 'dead cyclist' parks? the local rate
    > > payer?, state govt? or would it be a federal
    > > responsibility? in every single case the one who
    > > actually pays is the taxpayer, and I for one would
    > > be bloody angry if my tax money
    was
    > > diverted to such a cause (yes I know it already goes
    > > to equally stupid ideas, but why come up with more?).
    >
    >
    >
    > If, as pointed out by cfsmtb (quoting Phil Crohn) that
    > more people have died on our roads last century than in
    > all wars combined, then perhaps the park/memorial idea has
    > legs. After all, how many shrines, memorial plaques etc
    > does every town, city, location have? could incoroporate
    > them into those naff Lion's club parks in every town

    A few problems with that justification.

    1. That road toll figure is frankly an abuse of statistics,
    look at the amount of troops we've sent to war and the
    amount of time they were in a war zone, then compare it
    to the fact that all of us are road users and we use the
    roads to one extent or another virtually every day and
    suddenly that 'shocking road statistic' is pretty
    inconsequential.

    2. Those road users didn't choose to put their lives at
    additional risk to protect the rest of us, so a
    specific memorial seems no more needed than any other
    cause of death.

    3. I have no problem with people choosing to put up a
    memorial to almost anything, just don't ask me to
    pay for it.
     
  6. Baka Dasai

    Baka Dasai Guest

    On Mon, 3 May 2004 00:22:38 +1000, L'acrobat said (and I quote):
    > I can see the point to a roadside memorial as, if done
    > right, may make drivers more aware of cyclists (if only in
    > the general area of the memorial).

    I think the main message these memorials would send is that
    cycling is a terribly dangerous thing to do, and that if you
    are stupid enough to get on a bike, there's a good chance
    you'll get run over.

    Seeing as a greater number of cyclists leads to better
    driving behaviour and therefore increased cyclist safety,
    anything that tends to discourage cycling serves to reduce
    the safety of those remaining cyclists.

    So I think these memorials are a bad idea. It's better to
    promote cycling as a safe thing to do rather than a
    dangerous thing to do.
    --
    What was I thinking?
     
  7. powinc

    powinc New Member

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    Seeing as a greater number of cyclists leads to better
    driving behaviour and therefore increased cyclist safety,
    anything that tends to discourage cycling serves to reduce
    the safety of those remaining cyclists.

    I disagree with the above point, with my reference being that on occasions where a mass of cyclists interfere the car driver's 'god given right' to the open road, there is negative feedback, mostly though the tabloid press. Critical Mass for example gets over 95% of car drivers irate.

    powinc
     
  8. Baka Dasai

    Baka Dasai Guest

    On Tue, 04 May 2004 11:42:12 GMT, powinc said (and I quote):
    > I disagree with the above point, with my reference
    > being that on occasions where a mass of cyclists
    > interfere the car driver's 'god given right' to the
    > open road, there is negative feedback, mostly though
    > the tabloid press. Critical Mass for example gets over
    > 95% of car drivers irate.

    I wasn't referring to group rides or Critical Mass (not that
    I have anything against them), but simply to overall numbers
    of individual cyclists. If encountering a cyclist on the
    road is a frequent occurrence for drivers, they naturally
    get better at dealing with it. If they only encounter
    cyclists rarely, they stop looking out for you.

    This leads to some perverse results, for example, mandatory
    helmet laws making cycling less safe by causing a large
    reduction in cycling numbers.

    The widely-held view that cycling on the road is very
    dangerous is self-fulfilling. If you can get people to
    believe that cycling on the road is safe, it will become so.
    --
    What was I thinking?
     
  9. Ken Oaf

    Ken Oaf Guest

    On Sun, 2 May 2004 18:10:28 +0800, "Marty Wallace" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > We also have a long tiled snake that represents the Wagyl
    > set into the footpath of the main street. Tiles set into
    > the snakes form have the names of the winners of the
    > Collie -Donnybrook cycle race which extends back about 77
    > years. At the end is a large tiled apple which represents
    > Donnybrook, the home of the Granny Smith and Pink Lady
    > apples. The snake is about 100 metres long.

    The home of the Granny Smith apple is Eastwood in Sydney.
     
  10. "Ken Oaf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 2 May 2004 18:10:28 +0800, "Marty Wallace"
    > <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > We also have a long tiled snake that represents the
    > > Wagyl set into the footpath of the main street. Tiles
    > > set into the snakes form have the
    names
    > > of the winners of the Collie -Donnybrook cycle race
    > > which extends back
    about
    > > 77 years. At the end is a large tiled apple which
    > > represents Donnybrook,
    the
    > > home of the Granny Smith and Pink Lady apples. The snake
    > > is about 100
    metres
    > > long.
    >
    > The home of the Granny Smith apple is Eastwood in Sydney.
    >
    >

    Hmmm You're right! Even though Donnybrook calls itself the
    Home of the Granny Smith apple it seems it WAS discovered in
    Sydney. Donnybrook developed the Lady Williams and Pink Lady
    varieties.
     
  11. mikeg

    mikeg New Member

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    Most definitely the home of the "Granny Smith Apple" is Eastwood Sydney, I am a 7th generation descendant of "Granny Smith"

    The variety grew from seeds which grew near Threlfall Street Eastwood

    Mike
     
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