Cyclists with Asthma, Ozone Machines

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bruce Johnston, Jan 27, 2003.

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  1. Did anyone have any hard data or experience with Ozone machines? Are any of you cyclists that have
    Asthma use Ozone machines to breathe easier? There seems to be plenty of information for both camps
    since Alpine got sued for their generators. Telsa used to sell them, they go back pretty far. I got
    a small machine for my office because I was getting smoked out by the neighbor's fireplace. After
    filing the health dept. twice, they couldn't effect any changes since the fireplace was legal. Quite
    often I am a prisoner at home with my windows shut so I opted for an Ozone machine. My friend used
    one for years as a Asthmatic sufferer and claimed to have helped him breathe better but he never did
    any research on them. Since many states have clamped down on Ozone machines, and lines have been
    drawn between the two sides, it hard to find out what the truth is. Some sites with FAQ's claim
    Ozone is harmless and that many machines don't produce enough to harm you or the Ozone breaks up as
    an unstable compound before it can do any harm. Others claim that their machines limit nitric
    releases such as nitric acid or nitric oxide gas with UV technology. The FDA and USDA and health
    officials have warned that Ozone machines could reduce lung capacity and consider ozone toxic. O2
    becomes O3 and the short-term benefits are obvious. It kills odors and smells good but is it safe? I
    don't have a big machine, just a small one that claims to be effective up to 500 square feet. So far
    I feel fine, and haven't noticed any problems with eye or nose irritation, breathing problems. Most
    of what I have read are those that try to suggest they are safe, namely the vendors and the good ole
    Gov telling us not to use them because they are not safe. Does anyone here know what the truth is
    about Ozone machines?

    Thanks,

    Bruce
     
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  2. Phil Holman

    Phil Holman Guest

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  3. That site has plenty of info for Ozone in general, but very little for the Pros and Cons of Ozone
    generators. From reading other articles, it looks like the FDA is asking the same question, [show us
    the data?] Looks like there hasn't been any studies done on the machines but they have quickly moved
    to limit and restrict their use even though there are tons of them in use today. They are not
    recognized as medical devices but rather they are know as household appliances. Since they are not
    regulated many companies sell them with different options with add-ons like ionizers and oxygen
    accelerators. Others limit Nitric compounds and some have pollenex filters for particulate matter,
    pollon, etc. Restaurants and commercial enterprises use them to limit particulate matter and odors,
    but in a large environment the effects seem to be neglible. The pros seems to be that odors can be
    eliminated and act as a germicide, killing viruses and bacteria but there are no studies to prove
    that according to the FDA. Those articles could be outdated, and the FDA might have new evidence.
    Medical supply stores used to sell them and I suppose some still do, but since the Gov shakedown it
    looks like the generators are not legal everywhere. The generators do kill smells like smoke, food,
    tobacco, and other odors that are hard to get rid of, but as to being safe to breathe there doesn't
    seem to be enough data either way. This ozone is at much lower levels and not to be confused with
    outdoor ozone, and doesn't seem to increase even if the machines are left on overnight. It seems
    that the only complaints are from those that are already suffering from allergies or respiratory
    problems like asthma but ironically some of these same people say the machines have helped them to
    breathe easier. Looks like exposure limits for PPM are just guesses detemined by and estimated by
    room size and generator output. FTC prohibits Ozone generator manufactures from making claims about
    health benifits but they do it anyway. EPA also has no data for either way for Ozone machines. Looks
    like some independents studies have been done like Ozonelabs but without Gov oversight or
    collaboration the results are questionable.

    If anyone has any experience with Ozone generators or has better data, let me know. I would think
    that a lot of cyclists that breathe smog or have asthma have at one time or another checked into
    charging theirs lungs at home with any number of air purifiers.

    thanks, Bruce
    -------------------------------------------------------------

    "Phil Holman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Bruce Johnston" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > Most of what I have read are those that try to suggest they are safe, namely the vendors and the
    > > good ole Gov telling us not to
    use
    > > them because they are not safe. Does anyone here know what the truth is about Ozone machines?
    >
    >
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_ui
    ds=10638845&dopt=Abstract
    >
    >
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=PubMed&cmd=Display&dopt=pub
    med_pubmed&from_uid=685826
    >
     
  4. Sparhawk

    Sparhawk Guest

    On Mon, 27 Jan 2003 23:03:07 -0800, "Bruce Johnston" <[email protected]> wrote:

    Use a HEPA air filtration system, very little controversial there.

    Sparhawk
     
  5. I agree that Hepa is a good choice or a larger commerical air filtration system. Hepa is cheaper
    though. The only drawback I have read about Hepas is that the filters need to be changed or cleaned
    more often.

    B-
    ----------------------------
    "Sparhawk" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 27 Jan 2003 23:03:07 -0800, "Bruce Johnston" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Use a HEPA air filtration system, very little controversial there.
    >
    > Sparhawk
     
  6. Cathy Boland

    Cathy Boland Guest

    "Bruce Johnston" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I agree that Hepa is a good choice or a larger commerical air filtration system. Hepa is cheaper
    > though. The only drawback I have read about Hepas
    is
    > that the filters need to be changed or cleaned more often.
    >

    Every six months or so. It isn't that big of a deal. I have a Hepa filter on my central heat/air
    system and personal Hepa filters in my bedroom and home office. Seems to help with the allergies
    (and thus the asthma)
     
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