cyclocomputer mess

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Santa, Jan 31, 2003.

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  1. Santa

    Santa Guest

    got to change my cyclocomputer battery and forgot to set tire size, now my mileage is all screwed
    up, not that i use it much but this was the year i planned to get an actual log of my mileage, i
    could restart from zero but when you ride as much as i do every little mile is a whole lot of
    encouragement and don't want to end up thinking that i rode 100 = miles in the year, it would be
    better know that i rode all 105,74 miles in 2003. So i just want to know if some of you the not
    mathematically challenged can tell me if calculating it as a 3 rule knowing the mileage marked, the
    size marked and the actual size will actually give me a credible result. thanks.
     
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  2. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    santa wrote:

    > tell me if calculating it as a 3 rule knowing the mileage marked, the size marked and the actual
    > size will actually give me a credible result. thanks.

    Yes, it will:

    Actual distance = marked distance * actual size / size marked
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  3. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "santa" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > got to change my cyclocomputer battery and forgot to set tire size, now my mileage is all screwed
    > up, not that i use it much but this was the year i planned to get an actual log of my mileage, i
    > could restart from zero but when you ride as much as i do every little mile is a whole lot of
    > encouragement and don't want to end up thinking that i rode 100 = miles in the year, it would be
    > better know that i rode all 105,74 miles in 2003. So i just want to know if some of you the not
    > mathematically challenged
    can
    > tell me if calculating it as a 3 rule knowing the mileage marked, the size marked and the actual
    > size will actually give me a credible result.

    I think you are asking how to set the wheel travel setting, right? Most computers accept the wheel
    travel in meters. Best method is to ride over a spot of paint and measure from dot to dot on the
    pavement ( or even over several dots) A typical entry is "211" or "2105".

    This is typical but by no means universal. What kind of computer do you have?

    If you are asking how to input your prior accumulated mileage, I don't know.
    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  4. A Muzi wrote:

    > Most computers accept the wheel travel in meters. A typical entry is "211" or "2105".

    I want wheels that big.

    Stergios
     
  5. Velocat

    Velocat Guest

    > "santa" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>got to change my cyclocomputer battery and forgot to set tire size, now my mileage is all screwed
    >>up, not that i use it much but this was the year i planned to get an actual log of my mileage, i
    >>could restart from zero but when you ride as much as i do every little mile is a whole lot of
    >>encouragement and don't want to end up thinking that i rode 100 = miles in the year, it would be
    >>better know that i rode all 105,74 miles in 2003. So i just want to know if some of you the not
    >>mathematically challenged
    >
    > can
    >
    >>tell me if calculating it as a 3 rule knowing the mileage marked, the size marked and the actual
    >>size will actually give me a credible result.
    >
    I think you are asking how to convert the indicated mileage with the wrong tire size to actual
    mileage. This is fairly simple. Simply divide the actual tire size by the size stored in your
    computer and multiply this by the indicated mileage. This will give you the true mileage.

    For example, if the stored value is 210 (cm) and the actual circumference of your wheel is 205 (cm),
    you would divide 205 by 210 (.9762) and multiply this by the mileage stored in you bike computer.

    Hope this helps.
     
  6. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

  7. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > >A Muzi, wildly inaccurate but well-meaning, wrote:
    > >> Most computers accept the wheel travel in meters. > >> A typical entry
    is "211" or "2105".

    > On Sat, 01 Feb 2003 12:03:08 -0500, a sharp-eyed Stergios Papadakis, who
    could be a copy editor,
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >I want wheels that big.

    "John Everett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Many cyclocomputers will allow you to have wheels that big. See:
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/cyclecomputer_calibration.html
    > Check in the page for "Group F".

    I think he was pointing out my omitted decimal

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  8. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Mon, 3 Feb 2003 22:49:14 -0600, "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> >A Muzi, wildly inaccurate but well-meaning, wrote:
    >> >> Most computers accept the wheel travel in meters. > >> A typical entry
    >is "211" or "2105".
    >
    >> On Sat, 01 Feb 2003 12:03:08 -0500, a sharp-eyed Stergios Papadakis, who
    >could be a copy editor,
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >I want wheels that big.
    >
    >
    >"John Everett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> Many cyclocomputers will allow you to have wheels that big. See:
    > http://www.sheldonbrown.com/cyclecomputer_calibration.html
    >> Check in the page for "Group F".
    >
    >
    >I think he was pointing out my omitted decimal

    And I was trying to point out that many cyclocomputers accept wheel circumferences in centimeters
    (e.g. 211), while many others accept circumferences in millimeters (e.g. 2105).

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
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