Cyclometers . . .

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Bent Pedals, Oct 21, 2003.

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  1. Bent Pedals

    Bent Pedals Guest

    Is it just me, or is my cyclometer/speedometer as much as nuisance as a useful tool?

    Went for a ride today and made it several blocks before I realized I'd forgotten the
    speedometer. I said the heck with it and continued on my merry way. It had to be one of the
    most enjoyable rides in the 5 weeks since I picked up my bent! No fussing around checking
    time/distance/average, no racing trying to keep the average up, and no second thoughts
    heading home, trying to sneak in one or two more kilometers on the ride. It was almost like
    the self imposed "competition" was off. It resulted in a relaxed, leisurely, 1.5 hour ride.
    Just what the doctored ordered to shake off the impending winter blues.

    Yes, speedometers are useful and interesting, and the numbers certainly let you see
    improvement in your riding and where maybe a little more work might be needed. And they are
    invaluable in keeping logs and keeping track of distances and averages. All useful and
    interesting stuff without argument.

    Am I the only one that thinks this way? How many ride, working with the numbers on the
    cyclometer and how many ride and ignore the numbers until the end of the trip?

    Grin, maybe before a ride I should draw a white sock over the speedo and ignore the numbers
    until after the ride is over. (sorry Risto, couldn't resist).
     
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  2. Mark Leuck

    Mark Leuck Guest

    "Bent Pedals" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]...
    >
    > Is it just me, or is my cyclometer/speedometer as much as nuisance as a useful tool?
    >
    > Went for a ride today and made it several blocks before I realized I'd forgotten the speedometer.
    > I said the heck with it and continued on my merry way. It had to be one of the most enjoyable
    > rides in the 5 weeks since I picked up my bent! No fussing around checking time/distance/average,
    > no racing trying to keep the average up, and no second thoughts heading home, trying to sneak in
    > one or two more kilometers on the ride. It was almost like the self imposed "competition" was off.
    > It resulted in a relaxed, leisurely, 1.5 hour ride. Just what the doctored ordered to shake off
    > the impending winter blues.
    >
    > Yes, speedometers are useful and interesting, and the numbers certainly let you see improvement in
    > your riding and where maybe a little more work might be needed. And they are invaluable in keeping
    > logs and keeping track of distances and averages. All useful and interesting stuff without
    > argument.
    >
    > Am I the only one that thinks this way? How many ride, working with the numbers on the cyclometer
    > and how many ride and ignore the numbers until the end of the trip?
    >
    > Grin, maybe before a ride I should draw a white sock over the speedo and ignore the numbers until
    > after the ride is over. (sorry Risto, couldn't resist).

    It depends on the ride, on the Baron during short 20 - 30 mile trips I tend to use and pay attention
    to it more, I did 70 miles Sunday and didn't pay attention to it at all.
     
  3. Rod Dabe

    Rod Dabe Guest

    I take it you forgot your GPS too? How did you figure out your ascent and descent totals?

    Rod (tongue firmly planted in cheek)
     
  4. "Bent Pedals" skrev

    > Am I the only one that thinks this way? How many ride, working with the numbers on the cyclometer
    > and how many ride and ignore the numbers until the end of the trip?

    A faulty harness on my Cateye Astrale means only cadence works. I do miss the distance and max speed
    functions a bit but otherwise theres no problem. Wouldn't be without cadence though.

    Mikael
     
  5. Bentjay

    Bentjay Guest

    If you're following any of the Adventure Cycling maps, knowing distance to the nearest tenth/mile is
    helpful as their narratives refer to mileage. My old Cateye has a hrm function which is useful in
    riding an aerobically correct ride when I'm training. Knowing that I average only 15 mph is
    information I could do without!

    BentJay
     
  6. [email protected] (BentJay) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > If you're following any of the Adventure Cycling maps, knowing distance to the nearest tenth/mile
    > is helpful as their narratives refer to mileage. My old Cateye has a hrm function which is useful
    > in riding an aerobically correct ride when I'm training. Knowing that I average only 15 mph is
    > information I could do without!
    >
    > BentJay

    My Sigma Sports (SS) 1200 computer stopped working. I brought it to a bike shop and he ordered a new
    model 1600 for $20. When it arrived, I had him do the reading and setup. The letters were bigger
    than my old
    800/1200 SS model plus it has this new feature where I can set the miles and tripdown. Tripdown
    counts backwards so that I can just ride and not worry about directions. I like my computer but
    I trained myself to not be so concerned about the computer. The thing that help me train was the
    position on my Aero. I placed it on the bar directly in front. To reach the computer, I have to
    unclip the water tube and so I try not to use the computer.
    http://www.sigmasport.com/index_eos.html click on "virtual Demo" on the right.
     
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