Daft question

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Chris Nowak, Feb 1, 2005.

  1. Chris Nowak

    Chris Nowak Guest

    I know this sounds daft but I got a new bike today. It has pedal 'cages' for
    your feet. Not sure of the technical term.
    That's not the question though, its how do you get your feet into them
    without falling off. I will be riding in London traffic and its not safe to
    look down to engaged them.
    Any answers should be address to "Mr Wobbly"
    Ta
    Chris
     
    Tags:


  2. On Tue, 01 Feb 2005 20:31:46 GMT, "Chris Nowak"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I know this sounds daft but I got a new bike today. It has pedal 'cages' for
    >your feet. Not sure of the technical term.
    >That's not the question though, its how do you get your feet into them
    >without falling off. I will be riding in London traffic and its not safe to
    >look down to engaged them.


    Sounds like toeclips&straps.

    The technique for getting your foor in does indeed take a little
    skill. The usual method is to get the toeclip to engage with your
    foot, rather than getting your foot to engage with the toeclip.

    In the natural position, the weight of the "cage" (cage normally
    refers to a type of pedal) will make it hang upside down beneath the
    pedal. The technique for getting your foot in is to place your toe
    against the upper rear part of the pedal, and "flick" the pedal round
    half a turn so that the toeclip engages onto your foot.

    With practice, it can be done without looking. If it doesn't enage
    first time, don't panic. Simply place your foot on what is effectively
    the underside of the pedal and have another attempt when you have
    assessed your safety. (*some* pedals which are designed for use with
    toeclips are not flat on the underside, so do take care)

    It is normal to keep one foot (commonly your right foot) always
    clipped in.

    If you feel safer, you could try removing the straps, giving you a
    slightly easier engagement. Replace the straps as you become more
    confident.

    Remember also that if you panic-stop, you need to pull your feet
    backwards to release them!

    HTH
     
  3. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    "Chris Nowak" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I know this sounds daft but I got a new bike today. It has pedal 'cages'

    for
    > your feet. Not sure of the technical term.
    > That's not the question though, its how do you get your feet into them
    > without falling off. I will be riding in London traffic and its not safe

    to
    > look down to engaged them.
    > Any answers should be address to "Mr Wobbly"
    > Ta
    > Chris


    If you are not used to riding in them; London 2005 is not a good place to
    learn; take the cages off and buy some SPD's, seriously.
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > I know this sounds daft but I got a new bike today. It has pedal 'cages' for
    > your feet. Not sure of the technical term.
    > That's not the question though, its how do you get your feet into them
    > without falling off. I will be riding in London traffic and its not safe to
    > look down to engaged them.
    > Any answers should be address to "Mr Wobbly"


    Get one foot in before you move off. Tap the back-side of the other
    pedal and slide your foot forward as the cage rolls upwards. Easy.

    If you don't engage in them the worst that can happen is that you'll
    grind them on the floor.

    --
    Hywel http://kibo.org.uk/
    I do not eat quiche.
     
  5. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Chris Nowak wrote:

    > That's not the question though, its how do you get your feet into them
    > without falling off. I will be riding in London traffic and its not safe to
    > look down to engaged them.


    Start off with one foot in, and don't worry about the other to start
    with. The clip and strap will naturally rotate the pedal so it's facing
    down, so just use the back. This is enough to get going, and it means
    no worries about getting out next time you stop. Flip it with your toe
    as others have said once you're rolling happily.

    But clipless pedals like SPDs are, IME, easier to use and more
    effective, the only gotcha being you need specific cycling shoes, but
    for any sort of distance cycling shoes are a /lot/ better than anything
    else: more comfort and more power, so I'd get a pair even if you keep
    with clips and straps. Most these days allow a SPuD cleat to be fitted
    (but don't require it) so you can move to SPuDs later and still benefit
    from the shoes.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  6. "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > But clipless pedals like SPDs are, IME, easier to use and more effective,
    > the only gotcha being you need specific cycling shoes, but for any sort of
    > distance cycling shoes are a /lot/ better than anything else: more comfort
    > and more power, so I'd get a pair even if you keep with clips and straps.
    > Most these days allow a SPuD cleat to be fitted (but don't require it) so
    > you can move to SPuDs later and still benefit from the shoes.
    >
    > Pete.


    Another vote for clipless here (But I use Look ones). Being an unintentional
    convert to clipless, I've never regretted the change from platform pedals to
    clipless - even though I've had the standard incident of forgetting to
    unclip before stopping... the one positive attribute of a large ar*e - more
    padding, less pain ;-) The move to clipless has saved my knees from pain and
    the greater efficiency in pedalling is noticeable.

    Cheers, helen s
     
  7. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    MartinM wrote:

    > I also use Look for road riding but for riding in London with its inherent
    > de-clipping would probably go for SPD.


    I actually use Time ATACs rather than yer ackshewal Shimano SPuDs,
    finding they engage more easily and more positively and suffer less with
    wearing cleats, plus there's no pratting about with tension adjusters
    and they don't need so much (i.e., basically any) cleaning. They do
    cost a little more, but hey!, I'm worth it! ;-)

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  8. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    "Helen C Simmons" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > But clipless pedals like SPDs are, IME, easier to use and more

    effective,
    > > the only gotcha being you need specific cycling shoes, but for any sort

    of
    > > distance cycling shoes are a /lot/ better than anything else: more

    comfort
    > > and more power, so I'd get a pair even if you keep with clips and

    straps.
    > > Most these days allow a SPuD cleat to be fitted (but don't require it)

    so
    > > you can move to SPuDs later and still benefit from the shoes.
    > >
    > > Pete.

    >
    > Another vote for clipless here (But I use Look ones).


    I also use Look for road riding but for riding in London with its inherent
    de-clipping would probably go for SPD.
     
  9. "MartinM" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > I also use Look for road riding but for riding in London with its inherent
    > de-clipping would probably go for SPD.
    >
    >

    I don't have a problem clipping in and out frequently of Look and I'm
    lucky - my shoes have the cleats recessed into the sole, so I can walk
    normally :)

    Cheers, helen s
     
  10. Brian G

    Brian G Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:

    > I actually use Time ATACs rather than yer ackshewal Shimano SPuDs...


    I'm interested in perhaps fitting ATACs to my road bike. I appreciate
    they require different cleats to my current SPD type, but do they
    require different shoes or can I fit the Time cleats to my current shoes
    (Specialized Taho)?
    --
    Brian G
     
  11. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Brian G wrote:

    > I'm interested in perhaps fitting ATACs to my road bike. I appreciate
    > they require different cleats to my current SPD type, but do they
    > require different shoes or can I fit the Time cleats to my current shoes
    > (Specialized Taho)?


    The cleats will fit the same things as standard SPuD cleats: I use them
    in Specialized Rockhoppers, Roos uses them in Shimano M[think of a
    number] touring shoes and we both have them in Shimano SD-60 sandals.

    Cleats come with the pedals, and are available from bike shops as
    separate replacements.

    They are similarly profiled to SPuD cleats so you can still walk
    normally if your shoes have a cleat recess (and these don't affect the
    use of the pedal).

    I have the original ATACs on the 'bent, MTB and freighter, Roos' are
    actually "ATAC Aliums" but they use the same cleat and seem functionally
    about the same.

    You'll probably do a bit better with Looks for max performance on a road
    bike, but then you will need new shoes and unless you can find rare
    examples of Look shoes with recesses then forget about walking anywhere.
    They're for the bike, of course, but I like being able to go to places
    and get off my bike as an option. Mileage varies...

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  12. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Chris Nowak
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > I know this sounds daft but I got a new bike today. It has pedal
    > 'cages' for your feet. Not sure of the technical term.


    They're called toeclips, or more tersely just clips.

    > That's not the question though, its how do you get your feet into them
    > without falling off.


    You don't _need_ to get your feet in them; you can ride perfectly safely
    with the pedal upside down. However the general technique, especially
    when learning, is

    1] Get one foot (e.g. right) in the toe clip, while keeping the other
    (left) on the ground

    2] Push off with the left foot and start to ride with the right foot in
    the clip and the left foot on the upside down pedal, until you get up
    to a comfortable speed and can safely coast.

    3] While coasting, flip the left pedal over with your foot and slide
    your toe into the clip. As you get more experienced you will find you
    can do this without coasting.

    You've now got substantial extra power for the same amount of effort.
    However, for even more,

    4] Lean down and pull the toe straps *really* tight.

    This has the great benefit that you can't get your feet out quickly and
    so it's much easier to fall off.

    In my opinion toeclips are now obsolete, and you should replace them as
    soon as possible with a pair of 'clipless' pedals, so called because
    they really do have clips to hold your feet, unlike the ones with what
    you graphically call cages. If this is the bike for the Finland ride
    you will want shoes (you will need shoes compatible with your pedals
    and vice versa) with recessed cleats, which means your choices are
    Crank Brothers' Eggbeaters, Shimano SPDs (or various clones), Speedplay
    Frogs, and Time ATACs. I think the opinion of the group - certainly my
    opinion - is that the ATACs are about the best of these.

    <URL:http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360012887>

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; Diplomacy, American: see Intelligence, Military
     
  13. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Brian G
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Peter Clinch wrote:
    >
    >> I actually use Time ATACs rather than yer ackshewal Shimano SPuDs...

    >
    > I'm interested in perhaps fitting ATACs to my road bike. I appreciate
    > they require different cleats to my current SPD type, but do they
    > require different shoes or can I fit the Time cleats to my current
    > shoes (Specialized Taho)?


    ATAC cleats have the same bolt pattern as the classic and MTB type SPDs
    (but not SPD-R) and so work with the same shoes.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; It appears that /dev/null is a conforming XSL processor.
     
  14. Brian G

    Brian G Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    > Brian G wrote:
    >
    >> I'm interested in perhaps fitting ATACs to my road bike. I appreciate
    >> they require different cleats to my current SPD type, but do they
    >> require different shoes or can I fit the Time cleats to my current
    >> shoes (Specialized Taho)?

    >
    >
    > The cleats will fit the same things as standard SPuD cleats: I use them
    > in Specialized Rockhoppers, Roos uses them in Shimano M[think of a
    > number] touring shoes and we both have them in Shimano SD-60 sandals.


    <snipped>

    > You'll probably do a bit better with Looks for max performance on a road
    > bike, but then you will need new shoes and unless you can find rare
    > examples of Look shoes with recesses then forget about walking anywhere.
    > They're for the bike, of course, but I like being able to go to places
    > and get off my bike as an option. Mileage varies...


    Thanks for that info. FWIW, I call that one my road bike because
    basically that's what it is and to distinguish it from my tourer and
    MTB, but I don't race it or use it for performance stuff. Like you, I
    like to spend time on foot if it suits me during a ride, so I invariably
    use so-called off-road shoes with cleat recesses.

    --
    Brian G
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>, Peter Clinch wrote:
    >Chris Nowak wrote:
    >
    >> That's not the question though, its how do you get your feet into them
    >> without falling off. I will be riding in London traffic and its not safe to
    >> look down to engaged them.

    >
    >Start off with one foot in, and don't worry about the other to start
    >with. The clip and strap will naturally rotate the pedal so it's facing
    >down, so just use the back. This is enough to get going, and it means
    >no worries about getting out next time you stop. Flip it with your toe
    >as others have said once you're rolling happily.
    >
    >But clipless pedals like SPDs are, IME, easier to use and more
    >effective, the only gotcha being you need specific cycling shoes


    Unless you use the sort of SPD pedals with clips on only one side.
    You do then have to learn to flip it to the side you want, but that's
    no harder than with traditional clips. When using non-cycling shoes
    you aren't held as securely as with traditional clips, but if you
    are worrying about that you probably want cycling shoes anyway,
    for the reasons Peter gave.
    Even pedals designed only for "clipless" use aren't always too bad
    for casual use with non-cycling shoes.

    (You can't sensibly put traditional clips on the non-"clipless"-clip
    side because they would constantly bang against the ground when you
    were using the SPD side. Not the end of the world, but more annoying
    than traditional pedals doing it just a few times until you flip them
    over while getting the hang of it. Actually on some setups it might be
    possible to tighten the straps enough to flatten the traditional clips
    enough when you aren't using them to avoid that. It wouldn't be a
    problem on most recumbents.)
     
  16. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Alan Braggins wrote:

    >>But clipless pedals like SPDs are, IME, easier to use and more
    >>effective, the only gotcha being you need specific cycling shoes


    > Unless you use the sort of SPD pedals with clips on only one side.


    I was more thinking of it from the other way: the "gotcha" is that a
    pair of SPuD-u-likes without investing in associated shoes is completely
    pointless.

    > You do then have to learn to flip it to the side you want


    I'm wondering if something like the Time Z Freerides may get out of
    this. They're an ATAC within a wide platform, designed for Loons on
    descent courses for that extra whiff of stability. Haven't held one in
    my paws, or clipped in so not 100% sure, but they look as if you might
    be able to use them as a pretty normal platform pedal with normal shoes,
    /and/ you've got clip in either side.
    Anyone used these?

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  17. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    "Helen C Simmons" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "MartinM" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > > I also use Look for road riding but for riding in London with its

    inherent
    > > de-clipping would probably go for SPD.
    > >
    > >

    > I don't have a problem clipping in and out frequently of Look and I'm
    > lucky - my shoes have the cleats recessed into the sole, so I can walk
    > normally :)


    Me neither, its just the constant wear by stepping on the cleats; I don't
    have shoes with recesses; did not even know they existed, I just use the
    cleat covers (not a good idea to try to put them on whilst on the bike ;-)
     
  18. MartinM wrote:

    > Me neither, its just the constant wear by stepping on the cleats; I
    > don't have shoes with recesses; did not even know they existed, I
    > just use the cleat covers (not a good idea to try to put them on
    > whilst on the bike ;-)


    I haven't seen a new pair of recessed-cleat Look shoes for ages, but an
    acquaintance somehow managed to cobble a set onto a pair of Specialized MTB
    shoes.

    My main promble with Looks is remembering to take the cleat covers OFF
    before locking the tailbox...

    --

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    World Domination?
    Just find a world that's into that kind of thing, then chain to the
    floor and walk up and down on it in high heels. (Mr. Sunshine)
     
  19. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    MSA wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    > says...
    >
    >>My main promble with Looks is remembering to take the cleat covers OFF
    >>before locking the tailbox...
    >>

    >
    >
    > That's my usual trick when I come out of the coffee stop!


    Just wondering, is a promble an ineffectual attempt to clip into
    clipless pedals when you havent realised there is something preventing
    you from doing so?

    ...d
     
  20. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    David Martin wrote:

    > Just wondering, is a promble an ineffectual attempt to clip into
    > clipless pedals when you havent realised there is something preventing
    > you from doing so?


    Or the inelegant slide across a station concourse when running for a
    train with look cleated shoes..

    ...d
     
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