Danish potato bread?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Serene, Apr 3, 2005.

  1. Serene

    Serene Guest

    My partner fondly remembers the potato bread his grandmother used to
    make. It was very dense, he says, and she was of Danish descent, I
    believe. She used to take pieces of it and fry them for him, too, and
    make cinnamon rolls out of it. Anyone have an really good, really
    substantial potato bread recipes they've tried?

    serene
    --
    http://serenejournal.livejournal.com
    http://www.jhuger.com
     
    Tags:


  2. Guest

    On Sun, 3 Apr 2005 00:40:02 -0800, [email protected] (Serene) wrote:

    >My partner fondly remembers the potato bread his grandmother used to
    >make. It was very dense, he says, and she was of Danish descent, I
    >believe. She used to take pieces of it and fry them for him, too, and
    >make cinnamon rolls out of it. Anyone have an really good, really
    >substantial potato bread recipes they've tried?
    >
    >serene



    You'll get passable results with a bread machine.
    Use a regular "white bread" recipe, but,
    Substitute 1/4 cup of the flour
    with 1/4 cup of potato flakes.


    <rj>
     
  3. Serene

    Serene Guest

  4. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Serene wrote:
    > My partner fondly remembers the potato bread his grandmother used to
    > make. It was very dense, he says, and she was of Danish descent, I
    > believe. She used to take pieces of it and fry them for him, too, and
    > make cinnamon rolls out of it. Anyone have an really good, really
    > substantial potato bread recipes they've tried?
    >
    > serene


    Almost sounds like German Lefse to me. I've never made it but (I shudder to
    suggest) try Google for Lefse?

    Jill
     
  5. Serene

    Serene Guest

    jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Serene wrote:
    > > My partner fondly remembers the potato bread his grandmother used to
    > > make. It was very dense, he says, and she was of Danish descent, I
    > > believe. She used to take pieces of it and fry them for him, too, and
    > > make cinnamon rolls out of it. Anyone have an really good, really
    > > substantial potato bread recipes they've tried?
    > >
    > > serene

    >
    > Almost sounds like German Lefse to me. I've never made it but (I shudder to
    > suggest) try Google for Lefse?


    I saw a special on Lefse once on FoodTV, and that's not it, but I sure
    wished I could have some when I was watching. :)

    serene
    --
    http://serenejournal.livejournal.com
    http://www.jhuger.com
     
  6. Mash

    Mash Guest

    X-No-Archive: yes
    Actually Lefse is Norwegian and is more like a Scandinavian tortilla.
    It is a flat bread can be made from potatoes, flour and I think even
    rye flour. I typically make Potato Lefse at Christmas for my
    American-Norwegian husband.

    Here's a recipe for Norwegian Potato Bread from Scandinavian Cooking by
    Beatrice Ojakangas.


    @@@@@
    White Potato Bread - Potetbrod - Norway

    1 envelope active dry yeast (1/4 ounce)
    1/2 cup warm water or water that potatoes were cooked in (110 degrees
    F)
    1/4 cup sugar
    1/2 cup butter, room temperature
    3 eggs
    2 teaspoons salt
    1 cup cooked mashed potaotes (can use leftover)
    1 cup milk, scalded, cooled
    6 to 7 cups all-purpose flour

    In a large bowl, stir yeast into warm water or potato water; let stand
    5 minutes to soften. Add sugar, butter, eggs, salt, potaotes and milk.
    Beat until smooth. Adding 1 cup at a time, beat in enough flour to make
    a stiff dough. Turn out onto a lightly floured board. Cover with a dry
    cloth; let stand 5 to 15 minutes. Wash and grease bowl; set aside.
    Grease two 9 x 5-inch loaf pans; set aside. Adding flour as necessary,
    knead dough until smooth, about 10 minutes. Place in greased bowl,
    round-up. Cover and let rise until doubled, about 2 hours. Punch down
    and divide into 2 loaves. Place in prepared loaf pans. Let rise until
    almost double, about 45 to 60 minutes.

    Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until loaves
    are golden and sound hollow when tapped. Cool on wire racks before
    serving. Makes 2 loaves.

    jmcquown wrote:
    > Serene wrote:
    > > My partner fondly remembers the potato bread his grandmother used

    to
    > > make. It was very dense, he says, and she was of Danish descent, I
    > >

    snippage...

    > > serene

    >
    > Almost sounds like German Lefse to me. I've never made it but (I

    shudder to
    > suggest) try Google for Lefse?
    >
    > Jill
     
  7. Serene

    Serene Guest

  8. Mash

    Mash Guest

    X-No-Archive: yes
    Actually Lefse is Norwegian and is more like a Scandinavian tortilla.
    It is a flat bread can be made from potatoes, flour and I think even
    rye flour. I typically make Potato Lefse at Christmas for my
    American-Norwegian husband.

    Here's a recipe for Norwegian Potato Bread from Scandinavian Cooking by
    Beatrice Ojakangas.


    @@@@@
    White Potato Bread - Potetbrod - Norway

    1 envelope active dry yeast (1/4 ounce)
    1/2 cup warm water or water that potatoes were cooked in (110 degrees
    F)
    1/4 cup sugar
    1/2 cup butter, room temperature
    3 eggs
    2 teaspoons salt
    1 cup cooked mashed potaotes (can use leftover)
    1 cup milk, scalded, cooled
    6 to 7 cups all-purpose flour

    In a large bowl, stir yeast into warm water or potato water; let stand
    5 minutes to soften. Add sugar, butter, eggs, salt, potaotes and milk.
    Beat until smooth. Adding 1 cup at a time, beat in enough flour to make
    a stiff dough. Turn out onto a lightly floured board. Cover with a dry
    cloth; let stand 5 to 15 minutes. Wash and grease bowl; set aside.
    Grease two 9 x 5-inch loaf pans; set aside. Adding flour as necessary,
    knead dough until smooth, about 10 minutes. Place in greased bowl,
    round-up. Cover and let rise until doubled, about 2 hours. Punch down
    and divide into 2 loaves. Place in prepared loaf pans. Let rise until
    almost double, about 45 to 60 minutes.

    Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until loaves
    are golden and sound hollow when tapped. Cool on wire racks before
    serving. Makes 2 loaves.

    jmcquown wrote:
    > Serene wrote:
    > > My partner fondly remembers the potato bread his grandmother used

    to
    > > make. It was very dense, he says, and she was of Danish descent, I
    > >

    snippage...

    > > serene

    >
    > Almost sounds like German Lefse to me. I've never made it but (I

    shudder to
    > suggest) try Google for Lefse?
    >
    > Jill
     
  9. Mash

    Mash Guest

    X-No-Archive: yes
    Actually Lefse is Norwegian and is more like a Scandinavian tortilla.
    It is a flat bread can be made from potatoes, flour and I think even
    rye flour. I typically make Potato Lefse at Christmas for my
    American-Norwegian husband.

    Here's a recipe for Norwegian Potato Bread from Scandinavian Cooking by
    Beatrice Ojakangas.


    @@@@@
    White Potato Bread - Potetbrod - Norway

    1 envelope active dry yeast (1/4 ounce)
    1/2 cup warm water or water that potatoes were cooked in (110 degrees
    F)
    1/4 cup sugar
    1/2 cup butter, room temperature
    3 eggs
    2 teaspoons salt
    1 cup cooked mashed potaotes (can use leftover)
    1 cup milk, scalded, cooled
    6 to 7 cups all-purpose flour

    In a large bowl, stir yeast into warm water or potato water; let stand
    5 minutes to soften. Add sugar, butter, eggs, salt, potaotes and milk.
    Beat until smooth. Adding 1 cup at a time, beat in enough flour to make
    a stiff dough. Turn out onto a lightly floured board. Cover with a dry
    cloth; let stand 5 to 15 minutes. Wash and grease bowl; set aside.
    Grease two 9 x 5-inch loaf pans; set aside. Adding flour as necessary,
    knead dough until smooth, about 10 minutes. Place in greased bowl,
    round-up. Cover and let rise until doubled, about 2 hours. Punch down
    and divide into 2 loaves. Place in prepared loaf pans. Let rise until
    almost double, about 45 to 60 minutes.

    Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until loaves
    are golden and sound hollow when tapped. Cool on wire racks before
    serving. Makes 2 loaves.

    jmcquown wrote:
    > Serene wrote:
    > > My partner fondly remembers the potato bread his grandmother used

    to
    > > make. It was very dense, he says, and she was of Danish descent, I
    > >

    snippage...

    > > serene

    >
    > Almost sounds like German Lefse to me. I've never made it but (I

    shudder to
    > suggest) try Google for Lefse?
    >
    > Jill
     
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