Dark chocolate may cut heart disease risk: study



R

Roman Bystrianyk

Guest
"Dark chocolate may cut heart disease risk: study", Reuters UK,
December 20, 2005,
Link:
http://www.healthsentinel.com/admin.php?table_name=news&adminEvent=add_table_item

A few squares of dark chocolate every day might cut the risk of serious
heart disease by helping to stave off the hardening of arteries,
according to a study published on Tuesday.

Researchers from University Hospital in Zurich studied 20 male smokers,
who are at greater risk of hardening arteries characteristic of
coronary heart disease, to see the effects of dark and white chocolate
on arterial blood flow.

The group, who were asked to abstain from eating foods rich in
antioxidants for 24 hours, were given 40 grams (2 ounces) of chocolate
to eat.

After two hours, ultrasound scans revealed that dark chocolate -- made
up of 74 percent cocoa solids -- significantly improved the smoothness
of arterial flow, whilst white chocolate, with four percent cocoa, had
no effect, the study published in Heart magazine said.

The researchers, who said further studies were needed, suggested that
the possible benefits arose from the antioxidants in dark chocolate.

"Only a small daily treat of dark chocolate may substantially increase
the amount of antioxidant intake and beneficially affect vascular
health," they said.
 
A

Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD

Guest
Roman Bystrianyk wrote:
> "Dark chocolate may cut heart disease risk: study", Reuters UK,
> December 20, 2005,
> Link:
> http://www.healthsentinel.com/admin.php?table_name=news&adminEvent=add_table_item
>
> A few squares of dark chocolate every day might cut the risk of serious
> heart disease by helping to stave off the hardening of arteries,
> according to a study published on Tuesday.
>
> Researchers from University Hospital in Zurich studied 20 male smokers,
> who are at greater risk of hardening arteries characteristic of
> coronary heart disease, to see the effects of dark and white chocolate
> on arterial blood flow.
>
> The group, who were asked to abstain from eating foods rich in
> antioxidants for 24 hours, were given 40 grams (2 ounces) of chocolate
> to eat.


Actually 40 grams is more like 1.4 ounces.

> After two hours, ultrasound scans revealed that dark chocolate -- made
> up of 74 percent cocoa solids -- significantly improved the smoothness
> of arterial flow, whilst white chocolate, with four percent cocoa, had
> no effect, the study published in Heart magazine said.
>
> The researchers, who said further studies were needed, suggested that
> the possible benefits arose from the antioxidants in dark chocolate.
>
> "Only a small daily treat of dark chocolate may substantially increase
> the amount of antioxidant intake and beneficially affect vascular
> health," they said.


That daily treat can stimulate appetite so that the benefit may be
offset by eventual weight gain for those who are not using the 2PD-OMER
Approach.

Would be more than happy to "glow" and chat about this and other things
like cardiology, diabetes and nutrition that interest those following
this thread here during the next on-line chat (12/22/05) from 6 to 7 pm
EST:

http://tinyurl.com/cpayh

For those who are put off by the signature, my advance apologies for
how the LORD has reshaped me:

http://tinyurl.com/bgfqt

Many Christmas blessings,

Andrew
http://tinyurl.com/b6xwk
 
M

Matti Narkia

Guest
19 Dec 2005 17:00:14 -0800 in article
<[email protected]> "Roman Bystrianyk"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>"Dark chocolate may cut heart disease risk: study", Reuters UK,
>December 20, 2005,
>Link:
>http://www.healthsentinel.com/admin.php?table_name=news&adminEvent=add_table_item
>
>A few squares of dark chocolate every day might cut the risk of serious
>heart disease by helping to stave off the hardening of arteries,
>according to a study published on Tuesday.
>
>Researchers from University Hospital in Zurich studied 20 male smokers,
>who are at greater risk of hardening arteries characteristic of
>coronary heart disease, to see the effects of dark and white chocolate
>on arterial blood flow.
>
>The group, who were asked to abstain from eating foods rich in
>antioxidants for 24 hours, were given 40 grams (2 ounces) of chocolate
>to eat.
>
>After two hours, ultrasound scans revealed that dark chocolate -- made
>up of 74 percent cocoa solids -- significantly improved the smoothness
>of arterial flow, whilst white chocolate, with four percent cocoa, had
>no effect, the study published in Heart magazine said.
>
>The researchers, who said further studies were needed, suggested that
>the possible benefits arose from the antioxidants in dark chocolate.
>
>"Only a small daily treat of dark chocolate may substantially increase
>the amount of antioxidant intake and beneficially affect vascular
>health," they said.


Thanks. A fairly extensive chocolate and cocoa reference list can be found
at the url

<http://groups.google.com/group/sci.med.nutrition/msg/41caa9b4b45b88a2?hl=en>

--
Matti Narkia
 
E

Enrico C

Guest
On 19 Dec 2005 17:13:10 -0800, Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD wrote in
<news:[email protected]> on
sci.med.cardiology,misc.health.alternative,sci.med.nutrition :

> Roman Bystrianyk wrote:
>> "Dark chocolate may cut heart disease risk: study", Reuters UK,
>> December 20, 2005,
>> Link:
>> http://www.healthsentinel.com/admin.php?table_name=news&adminEvent=add_table_item
>>
>> A few squares of dark chocolate every day might cut the risk of serious
>> heart disease by helping to stave off the hardening of arteries,
>> according to a study published on Tuesday.
>>
>> Researchers from University Hospital in Zurich studied 20 male smokers,
>> who are at greater risk of hardening arteries characteristic of
>> coronary heart disease, to see the effects of dark and white chocolate
>> on arterial blood flow.
>>
>> The group, who were asked to abstain from eating foods rich in
>> antioxidants for 24 hours, were given 40 grams (2 ounces) of chocolate
>> to eat.

>
> Actually 40 grams is more like 1.4 ounces.
>
>> After two hours, ultrasound scans revealed that dark chocolate -- made
>> up of 74 percent cocoa solids -- significantly improved the smoothness
>> of arterial flow, whilst white chocolate, with four percent cocoa, had
>> no effect, the study published in Heart magazine said.
>>
>> The researchers, who said further studies were needed, suggested that
>> the possible benefits arose from the antioxidants in dark chocolate.
>>
>> "Only a small daily treat of dark chocolate may substantially increase
>> the amount of antioxidant intake and beneficially affect vascular
>> health," they said.

>
> That daily treat can stimulate appetite


In fact, I find 75/80% cocoa dark chocolate rather satiating.
On the other hand, not-so-dark chocolate under 65% cocoa (less cocoa,
more sugar) can stimulate craving indeed.
At least, that was my personal experience.


> so that the benefit may be
> offset by eventual weight gain for those who are not using the 2PD-OMER
> Approach.


X'Posted to: sci.med.cardiology,misc.health.alternative,sci.med.nutrition
 
D

Doug Freese

Guest
"Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> For those who are put off by the signature, my advance apologies for
> how the LORD has reshaped me:


Reshaped? And Jeffrey Dahmer was convinced he was a vegetarian as he
gnawed in an elbow. There is another branch of science you might want to
investigate - Psychology and more specifically, the abnormal discipline.
In a more colloquial parlance you are whacked out! On a positive note,
you help solidify the abnormal line.

-DF
 
L

listener

Guest
"Doug Freese" <[email protected]> wrote in news:p[email protected]
wrt-01.rdc-nyc.rr.com:

>
> "Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> For those who are put off by the signature, my advance apologies for
>> how the LORD has reshaped me:

>
> Reshaped? And Jeffrey Dahmer was convinced he was a vegetarian as he
> gnawed in an elbow. There is another branch of science you might want to
> investigate - Psychology and more specifically, the abnormal discipline.
> In a more colloquial parlance you are whacked out! On a positive note,
> you help solidify the abnormal line.
>
> -DF
>
>
>


This has been "discerned" for some time by others in this group. The Lord
indeed works in mysterious ways.

L.
 
A

Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD

Guest
Enrico C wrote:
>
> On 19 Dec 2005 17:13:10 -0800, Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD wrote in
> <news:[email protected]> on
> sci.med.cardiology,misc.health.alternative,sci.med.nutrition :
>
> > Roman Bystrianyk wrote:
> >> "Dark chocolate may cut heart disease risk: study", Reuters UK,
> >> December 20, 2005,
> >> Link:
> >> http://www.healthsentinel.com/admin.php?table_name=news&adminEvent=add_table_item
> >>
> >> A few squares of dark chocolate every day might cut the risk of serious
> >> heart disease by helping to stave off the hardening of arteries,
> >> according to a study published on Tuesday.
> >>
> >> Researchers from University Hospital in Zurich studied 20 male smokers,
> >> who are at greater risk of hardening arteries characteristic of
> >> coronary heart disease, to see the effects of dark and white chocolate
> >> on arterial blood flow.
> >>
> >> The group, who were asked to abstain from eating foods rich in
> >> antioxidants for 24 hours, were given 40 grams (2 ounces) of chocolate
> >> to eat.

> >
> > Actually 40 grams is more like 1.4 ounces.
> >
> >> After two hours, ultrasound scans revealed that dark chocolate -- made
> >> up of 74 percent cocoa solids -- significantly improved the smoothness
> >> of arterial flow, whilst white chocolate, with four percent cocoa, had
> >> no effect, the study published in Heart magazine said.
> >>
> >> The researchers, who said further studies were needed, suggested that
> >> the possible benefits arose from the antioxidants in dark chocolate.
> >>
> >> "Only a small daily treat of dark chocolate may substantially increase
> >> the amount of antioxidant intake and beneficially affect vascular
> >> health," they said.

> >
> > That daily treat can stimulate appetite

>
> In fact, I find 75/80% cocoa dark chocolate rather satiating.
> On the other hand, not-so-dark chocolate under 65% cocoa (less cocoa,
> more sugar) can stimulate craving indeed.
> At least, that was my personal experience.


YMMV :))

Would be more than happy to "glow" and chat about this and other things
like cardiology, diabetes and nutrition that interest those following
this thread here during the next on-line chat(12/22/05) from 6 to 7 pm
EST:

http://tinyurl.com/cpayh

For those who are put off by the signature, my advance apologies for how
the LORD has reshaped me:

http://tinyurl.com/bgfqt

Many Christmas blessings,

Andrew
http://tinyurl.com/b6xwk
 
A

Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD

Guest
Doug Freese wrote:
>
> "Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > For those who are put off by the signature, my advance apologies for
> > how the LORD has reshaped me:

>
> Reshaped?


Yes.

Would be more than happy to "glow" and chat about this and other things
like cardiology, diabetes and nutrition that interest those following
this thread here during the next on-line chat(12/22/05) from 6 to 7 pm
EST:

http://tinyurl.com/cpayh

For those who are put off by the signature, my advance apologies for how
the LORD has reshaped me:

http://tinyurl.com/bgfqt

Many Christmas blessings,

Andrew
http://tinyurl.com/b6xwk
 
E

Enrico C

Guest
On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 12:00:30 -0500, Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD wrote in
<news:[email protected]> on
sci.med.cardiology,misc.health.alternative,sci.med.nutrition :

>> In fact, I find 75/80% cocoa dark chocolate rather satiating.
>> On the other hand, not-so-dark chocolate under 65% cocoa (less cocoa,
>> more sugar) can stimulate craving indeed.
>> At least, that was my personal experience.

>
> YMMV :))


Agreed. My impression is that it is quite a subjective matter, i.e.
depends on the individual.


X'Posted to: sci.med.cardiology,misc.health.alternative,sci.med.nutrition

--
Enrico C

* cut the ending "cut-togli.invalid" string when replying by email *
 
A

Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD

Guest
Enrico C wrote:
> On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 12:00:30 -0500, Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD wrote in
> <news:[email protected]> on
> sci.med.cardiology,misc.health.alternative,sci.med.nutrition :
>
> >> In fact, I find 75/80% cocoa dark chocolate rather satiating.
> >> On the other hand, not-so-dark chocolate under 65% cocoa (less cocoa,
> >> more sugar) can stimulate craving indeed.
> >> At least, that was my personal experience.

> >
> > YMMV :))

>
> Agreed. My impression is that it is quite a subjective matter, i.e.
> depends on the individual.


Actually it depends on how heavy the LORD's hand is on us :)

"Blessed are you who hunger now, for you will be satisfied." (Luke
6:21)

Would be more than happy to "glow" and chat about this and other things
like cardiology, diabetes and nutrition that interest those following
this thread here during the next on-line chat (12/22/05) from 6 to 7 pm
EST:

http://tinyurl.com/cpayh

For those who are put off by the signature, my advance apologies for
how the LORD has reshaped me:

http://tinyurl.com/bgfqt

Many Christmas blessings,

Andrew
http://tinyurl.com/b6xwk
 
M

Mars Observer

Guest
On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 10:19:31 +0100, Enrico C >>>
>>> "Only a small daily treat of dark chocolate may substantially increase
>>> the amount of antioxidant intake and beneficially affect vascular
>>> health," they said.

>>
>> That daily treat can stimulate appetite

>
>In fact, I find 75/80% cocoa dark chocolate rather satiating.
>On the other hand, not-so-dark chocolate under 65% cocoa (less cocoa,
>more sugar) can stimulate craving indeed.
>At least, that was my personal experience.


80%?! Holy @*!&. I love dark chocolate, but even I find 72% a
little dry and 'gritty'. Lindor/Lindt makes a variety of 72% extra
dark chocolates. Where do you find 80%??
 
E

Enrico C

Guest
On Wed, 21 Dec 2005 12:41:05 GMT, Mars Observer wrote in
<news:[email protected]> on
sci.med.cardiology,misc.health.alternative,sci.med.nutrition :

> 80%?! Holy @*!&. I love dark chocolate, but even I find 72% a
> little dry and 'gritty'. Lindor/Lindt makes a variety of 72% extra
> dark chocolates. Where do you find 80%??


Well, I find it in most shops. Lots of brands, actually.
Lindt, as you name it, even makes a 99% "Excellence" variety.
I agrre that's a tad too dark :)

Moving to a lighter (less "dark" ;) subject, I've just received some
"Cuneesi" chocolates as a gift: 55% cocoa chocolate shells filled with
rum. Not the healthiest, maybe, but... yummy! ;)



X'Posted to: sci.med.cardiology,misc.health.alternative,sci.med.nutrition

--
Enrico C

* cut the ending "cut-togli.invalid" string when replying by email *