Dawes Horizon

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Susan Sadler, Feb 5, 2003.

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  1. Susan Sadler

    Susan Sadler Guest

    I'm probably getting a Dawes horizon for a Valentine's pressie. I intend to use it as a way in to
    cycling in a semi-serious sort of way. Mostly shortish (20 mile) day rides and similar light touring
    (so I'm told!) sort of stuff.

    Simple question really. Is this the right bike for me?

    Sue Sadler
     
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  2. Rg

    Rg Guest

    ... will this be the one with the pink heart-shaped frame and a holder for a single red rose on the
    handlebars? - luck girl!

    And in answer to your question - I would think so

    RG

    "Susan Sadler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm probably getting a Dawes horizon for a Valentine's pressie. I intend
    to
    > use it as a way in to cycling in a semi-serious sort of way. Mostly shortish (20 mile) day rides
    > and similar light touring (so I'm told!) sort of stuff.
    >
    > Simple question really. Is this the right bike for me?
    >
    > Sue Sadler
     
  3. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Susan Sadler <[email protected]> writes
    >I'm probably getting a Dawes horizon for a Valentine's pressie.

    Nice pressie :)

    > I intend to use it as a way in to cycling in a semi-serious sort of way. Mostly shortish (20
    > mile) day rides and similar light touring (so I'm told!) sort of stuff.
    >
    >Simple question really. Is this the right bike for me?

    Sounds just right for the job. Don't be afraid to change things though if you find you don't like
    them, saddles esp are a personal thing.
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  4. Simon Hay

    Simon Hay Guest

    Susan Sadler wrote:
    > I'm probably getting a Dawes horizon for a Valentine's pressie. I intend to use it as a way in to
    > cycling in a semi-serious sort of way. Mostly shortish (20 mile) day rides and similar light
    > touring (so I'm told!) sort of stuff.
    >
    > Simple question really. Is this the right bike for me?

    Whether it's right for you or not is hard for me to say, but I can tell you that I've fairly
    recently bought myself a 2002 Horizon and think it's a great bike - reasonably light, feels sturdy,
    comfortable, and so on. Would definitely recommend it... If you've got any specific questions feel
    free to ask and I'll try to answer them :)

    Cheers,

    Simon
     
  5. John

    John Guest

    On Wed, 5 Feb 2003 20:11:35 +0000 (UTC), "Susan Sadler" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm probably getting a Dawes horizon for a Valentine's pressie. I intend to use it as a way in to
    >cycling in a semi-serious sort of way. Mostly shortish (20 mile) day rides and similar light
    >touring (so I'm told!) sort of stuff.
    >
    >Simple question really. Is this the right bike for me?
    >

    The bike is excellent, as long as it fits. (Saddles and handlebars can be made to go backwards and
    forwards as well as up and down).

    Enjoy it.

    John
     
  6. Toby Barrett

    Toby Barrett Guest

    "Susan Sadler" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    > I'm probably getting a Dawes horizon for a Valentine's pressie. I intend to use it as a way in to
    > cycling in a semi-serious sort of way. Mostly shortish (20 mile) day rides and similar light
    > touring (so I'm told!) sort of stuff.
    >
    > Simple question really. Is this the right bike for me?

    Got a Dawes Horizon for my wife a couple of years ago (actually an Edinburgh Country, but it's the
    same bike).

    It sounds ideal for what you want to do. We use our bikes for what you describe, and for commuting.

    The only thing you'll need to change immediately, I suggest, is the saddle. The one it comes with is
    not up to much and designed for men. My wife likes the women's specific Specialized Body Geometry
    one, but others differ.

    You can also adjust the brakes (if they are Shimano Sora like my wife's) so that the levers are
    nearer to the bars; this helps if your hands are small.

    Another thing is to make sure you get the right size. My wife is about average height for a woman
    (5'5") and went for the smallest frame available. Again, they are designed for men.

    We also changed the tyres on ours, for something a bit narrower and more hard-wearing. But
    this can wait.

    Toby
     
  7. Simon Hay <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Susan Sadler wrote:
    > > I'm probably getting a Dawes horizon for a Valentine's pressie. I intend to use it as a way in
    > > to cycling in a semi-serious sort of way. Mostly shortish (20 mile) day rides and similar light
    > > touring (so I'm told!) sort of stuff.
    > >
    > > Simple question really. Is this the right bike for me?
    >
    > Whether it's right for you or not is hard for me to say, but I can tell you that I've fairly
    > recently bought myself a 2002 Horizon and think it's a great bike - reasonably light, feels
    > sturdy, comfortable, and so on. Would definitely recommend it... If you've got any specific
    > questions feel free to ask and I'll try to answer them :)
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Simon

    It's a decent bike without doubt. The brakes took a bit of getting used to, being used to well
    maintained car brakes previously, but after fiddling they are spot on now. Definately fit slick
    tyres (28mm is the thinnest that will fit on the rim).

    My biggest problem with the Horizon is that it hints at the fun to be had from a full-on racer. Like
    living next door to a harem it offered only glimpses of true pleasure, but offered them frequently
    enough that I could stand the temptation no longer and risked scorn and injury by buying a TCR
    hard-core road bike.

    SteveP
     
  8. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    stephen pridgeon wrote:

    > My biggest problem with the Horizon is that it hints at the fun to be had from a full-on racer.

    Wearing a rucksack when you want to take anything anywhere... Not Fun in my book, as I usually want
    to take things somewhere. That's something a tourer does unquestionably better than a racer,
    assuming "something" is bigger than a banana. Also, though you'll find the exact right gear more
    often on flats and downhills on a race bike, the bigger range on a tourer usually makes big, long
    climbs rather nicer if you're not an out and out honker. Which one generally isn't, with luggage!
    And being sprayed with cack because the road's wet and you don't have any mudguards isn't my idea of
    a great time either...

    Full on racers are great toys, but they only play one game.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  9. Toby Barrett

    Toby Barrett Guest

    [email protected] (stephen pridgeon) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:
    > My biggest problem with the Horizon is that it hints at the fun to be had from a full-on racer.
    > Like living next door to a harem it offered only glimpses of true pleasure, but offered them
    > frequently enough that I could stand the temptation no longer and risked scorn and injury by
    > buying a TCR hard-core road bike.

    I too am getting this yearning. The fact that I already have two tourers (well I need them - what if
    one's off the road for a day or two?) and limited space and money has stopped me.

    Maybe, I should trade one of the tourers for an Audax bike. Still practical, but a bit faster? Or
    maybe I should go the whole hog....

    Toby
     
  10. W K

    W K Guest

    "Toby Barrett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] (stephen pridgeon) wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    > > My biggest problem with the Horizon is that it hints at the fun to be had from a full-on racer.
    > > Like living next door to a harem it offered only glimpses of true pleasure, but offered them
    > > frequently enough that I could stand the temptation no longer and risked scorn and injury by
    > > buying a TCR hard-core road bike.
    >
    > I too am getting this yearning. The fact that I already have two tourers (well I need them - what
    > if one's off the road for a day or two?) and limited space and money has stopped me.
    >
    > Maybe, I should trade one of the tourers for an Audax bike. Still practical, but a bit faster? Or
    > maybe I should go the whole hog....

    I'm sure true race bikes feel nice to ride and have an edge in racing, But realistically how much
    faster are they? 1, maybe 2 mph, mainly gained by making you sit in a more contorted position.

    Oh no ... I have a feeling I am moving away from the "no point buying all that fancy stuff" position
    to something altogether more sinister.
     
  11. John B

    John B Guest

    W K wrote:

    > "I'm sure true race bikes feel nice to ride and have an edge in racing, But realistically how much
    > faster are they? 1, maybe 2 mph, mainly gained by making you sit in a more contorted position.
    >
    > Oh no ... I have a feeling I am moving away from the "no point buying all that fancy stuff"
    > position to something altogether more sinister.

    Thinking of something a bit lower are we ;-)

    John B
     
  12. >I'm probably getting a Dawes horizon for a Valentine's pressie. I intend to use it as a way in to
    >cycling in a semi-serious sort of way. Mostly shortish (20 mile) day rides and similar light
    >touring (so I'm told!) sort of stuff.
    >
    >Simple question really. Is this the right bike for me?
    >
    >Sue Sadler

    emailed & posted...

    Should be a nice bike. Enjoy it.

    Things to help make cycling even more enjoyable ...

    1. Woman specific saddle - we are differently shaped to the men and usually bikes will come with a
    man's saddle as standard. A women specific saddle can make cycling fun as opposed to
    excruciating.

    2. Padded cycling shorts - a must in my book - I wear mine under my leggings whenever I'm on a bike.

    With above I can pootle along for hours, take my time - plenty of breaks - energy drinks.

    Oh, and 3. Plenty of nice relaxing muscle caring bubble bath for long soak at end of bike ride.

    Cheers, and much happy pedalling, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Flush out that intestinal parasite and/or the waste product before sending a reply!

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  13. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter wrote:

    > Oh, and 3. Plenty of nice relaxing muscle caring bubble bath for long soak at end of bike ride.

    Good call. I've found on XC ski holidays that a good stretching session in a sauna or steam room
    works even better as a wind down (normally I don't really get on with them, just at the end of
    serious exercise), but I've not got one of those handy at home :-(

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  14. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    W K wrote:

    > Oh no ... I have a feeling I am moving away from the "no point buying all that fancy stuff"
    > position to something altogether more sinister.

    Give into your backside, young Jedi - wind resistance is futile!

    Or is it the Dark Side? Something like that, anyway.

    --
    Guy
    ===
    I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
    about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
    wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.

    http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/09.shtml#103 http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/09.shtml#104
     
  15. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, stephen pridgeon
    <[email protected]> writes
    >Simon Hay <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >> Susan Sadler wrote:
    >> > I'm probably getting a Dawes horizon for a Valentine's pressie.
    >>
    >> Whether it's right for you or not is hard for me to say,
    >
    >Definately fit slick tyres (28mm is the thinnest that will fit on the rim).
    >
    This kinda depends on what the poster will use the bike for, if it gets used on poor surfaces such
    as many cycles paths then tyres with a certain amount of tread may be better. I prefer 32 mm tyres
    on my Tourer.

    >My biggest problem with the Horizon is that it hints at the fun to be had from a full-on racer.

    If you like that kind of thing maybe, personally I find racing/road bikes uncomfortable, poor range
    of gears, no where to carry my luggage.

    I much prefer my tourer.

    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  16. Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > stephen pridgeon wrote:
    >
    > > My biggest problem with the Horizon is that it hints at the fun to be had from a full-on racer.
    >
    > Wearing a rucksack when you want to take anything anywhere... Not Fun in my book, as I usually
    > want to take things somewhere. That's something a tourer does unquestionably better than a racer,
    > assuming "something" is bigger than a banana. Also, though you'll find the exact right gear more
    > often on flats and downhills on a race bike, the bigger range on a tourer usually makes big, long
    > climbs rather nicer if you're not an out and out honker. Which one generally isn't, with luggage!
    > And being sprayed with cack because the road's wet and you don't have any mudguards isn't my idea
    > of a great time either...
    >
    > Full on racers are great toys, but they only play one game.
    >
    > Pete.

    And indeed, they are great toys. And they only play one game. But it's a game I like :))

    But I wouldn't have known I like it apart from getting the Horizon. And of the hours spent in the
    saddle the Horizon has had probably about 100 times more "bum contact time" than the TCR. I only
    wanted to warn the OP of what she was getting into.

    SteveP
     
  17. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    stephen pridgeon wrote:

    > And indeed, they are great toys. And they only play one game. But it's a game I like :))

    And they play it well, too.

    > But I wouldn't have known I like it apart from getting the Horizon. And of the hours spent in the
    > saddle the Horizon has had probably about 100 times more "bum contact time" than the TCR. I only
    > wanted to warn the OP of what she was getting into.

    Not a sure thing though. I ceased to have aspirations for a real racer when I got a real tourer for
    practical reasons and found I preferred taking my time a bit more over rides. Wouldn't mind a racer
    again now, 15 years later, though it would have to be satanic, of course.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]dee.ac.uk
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  18. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Dave Kahn wrote:

    > You seem to be doing a good job of talking yourself into it. I don't want to influence you but
    > deep down you know you really need a no-compromise fully-faired dark side racer.

    Not 100% sure about that, but a Speedmachine or Windcheetah with a carbon tail fairing would, I
    think, not be something I'd completely resent owning. I certainly wouldn't resent having a bank
    balance that would buy one!

    In the meantime I'll try and wear out the cassette on the Streetmachine and give myself an excuse to
    put a Rohloff on it. That should keep the VISA fairy in work for a bit...

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  19. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > Not a sure thing though. I ceased to have aspirations for a real racer when I got a real tourer
    > for practical reasons and found I preferred taking my time a bit more over rides. Wouldn't mind a
    > racer again now, 15 years later, though it would have to be satanic, of course.

    You seem to be doing a good job of talking yourself into it. I don't want to influence you but deep
    down you know you really need a no-compromise fully-faired dark side racer.

    :)

    --
    Dave...
     
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