Decathlon vs Trek vs ???

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Tom Anderson, Mar 24, 2006.

  1. Tom Anderson

    Tom Anderson Guest

    Afternoon all,

    I'd like to buy a new bike. I want to spend 200-300 UKP on a mountain
    bike, which i'll mostly use for commuting to work, on the road, but
    which'll (hopefully) see plenty more varied use over the summer. I know a
    hybrid would be logical here, but i've really not been impressed with the
    ones i've looked at - plus, London roads really need something tougher!
    I'd prefer rigid forks, since i'm mostly going to be on the road or
    halfway decent trails, and the kind of boingy fork you get on a 200-300
    UKP bike is just going to sit there soaking up power and control while i'm
    doing that.

    If i go to my local bike shop, they'll sell me a Trek 4300 for 270 UKP. I
    know this, because that's what they sold me when i was in the same
    position last year. It was a generally decent bike, and served me well
    until it got pinched. The chainset somehow felt a bit flimsy, but it never
    broke or anything, so it was probably all in my mind.

    However, a friend suggested i try Decathlon, since apparently they're very
    good value. I've had a look at their website, but the descriptions of the
    bikes are pretty vague, and they don't give prices. They also don't seem
    to do much in the way of rigid forks. Moreover, i've never ridden one of
    their bikes, and have no sense of how good they are. Can anyone enlighten
    me? Are they good value? What's the build quality like? How's the
    after-sales service?

    There is a third option - a slightly-less-local bike shop (a Cycle
    Surgery) down the road. I have no idea what they've got; their website
    claims they don't have anything rigid, but amongst the front-sus bikes,
    it's Marins and Specializeds in my price range - i believe those are good
    quality, but perhaps not such good value, since you're paying extra for
    the name. Although they do have a sale on at the moment!

    So, any thoughts would be most welcome.

    Ta buckets,
    tom

    --
    Many of us adopted the File's slang as our own, feeling that we'd found a
    tangible sign of the community of minds we'd half-guessed to be out there.
     
    Tags:


  2. Bryan

    Bryan New Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2003
    Messages:
    365
    Likes Received:
    0
    Decathlon do offer very good value, and actually have ome staff who know what they are talking about (Surrey Quays used to be my LBS when Ilived there). I'd go down there and give the bikes test out, they normally let you have quite a bit of free reign on riding. I've never bought a biek from them, but a friend has and liked it very much until it got nicked.

    Cyclesurgery are also good, I've never bought a bike them and can;t say Iv;e seen too many low proced machines there (Liverpool St branch anyway) ut then again I get drawn to teh more expensive ones, so cheaper ones may be there:)

    Don;t worry too much about getting a mtb instead of a hybrid, I used to cycle right across London 4 times a week (24 mile each way commute) on my touring bike with 700x28 tyres, and never had a comfort problem.

    Simple answer is go to teh shops, and ssee if any of the bikes on offer are better than the Trek, after all you know what that's like. Another place to condsider is Condor cycles, a friend when there after getting bad service form other shops, and was amazed at the service he got, and walked out with a Marin, ideal for what he wanted.


    Bryan
     
  3. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Tom
    Anderson ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Afternoon all,
    >
    > I'd like to buy a new bike. I want to spend 200-300 UKP on a mountain
    > bike, which i'll mostly use for commuting to work, on the road, but
    > which'll (hopefully) see plenty more varied use over the summer. I know
    > a hybrid would be logical here, but i've really not been impressed with
    > the ones i've looked at - plus, London roads really need something
    > tougher!


    Oh, help, this is the second one in a week.

    Mountain bikes are NOT 'tougher' than other bikes. Downhill and freeride
    bikes /are/ tougher, but are even more unsuitable for riding on the
    road. Mountain bikes generally have different geometry - higher bottom
    bracket and different head angles - which is designed to cope with very
    uneven terrain. They are not designed for use on the road and may be
    significantly less suitable for use on the road. Furthermore, the sort
    of 'mountain bike' you can buy for £300 isn't much good off-road either.

    You /don't/ want a mountain bike. You /do/ want a hybrid or an 'urban'
    bike or a 'road' bike. If in the summer you want to ride Coed y Brenin
    or the 7stanes or somewhere, hire a mountain bike for that.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    ,/| _.--''^``-...___.._.,;
    /, \'. _-' ,--,,,--'''
    { \ `_-'' ' /
    `;;' ; ; ;
    ._..--'' ._,,, _..' .;.'
    (,_....----''' (,..--''
     
  4. Clive George

    Clive George Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > Oh, help, this is the second one in a week.
    >
    > Mountain bikes are NOT 'tougher' than other bikes.


    But 26" wheels are tougher than 700s - MTBs tend to get the former,
    hybrid/urban/road bikes tend to get the latter.

    Not that I'm entirely disagreeing with you - I wouldn't use an MTB even with
    slicks for road riding.

    cheers,
    clive
     
  5. > So, any thoughts would be most welcome.

    As Simon says, any bike will be able to cope with London roads - wheels are
    very strong, and I haven't damaged my road bike's wheels yet - so that
    frees you up to look at a wider range of bikes.

    Sounds like a hybrid would be perfect - can do all the off road stuff and
    is a _lot_ more suited to the on road stuff.

    Obvious I know but don't forget the mudguards.
     
  6. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Clive
    George ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >> Oh, help, this is the second one in a week.
    >>
    >> Mountain bikes are NOT 'tougher' than other bikes.

    >
    > But 26" wheels are tougher than 700s - MTBs tend to get the former,
    > hybrid/urban/road bikes tend to get the latter.


    I really don't believe there's a measurable difference. The wheel I
    crashed into a boulder at 46 miles per hour last October was 700c. The
    rim's a bit battered, but the wheel is still perfectly true, and still
    ridable. The difference in dimension between a 26" and a 700c is very
    small. Furthermore, of course, at any rim braked wheel of any size will
    be stronger than any disk braked wheel of similar construction, simply
    because the spokes are at a less acute angle.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    Morning had broken, and there was nothing left for us to do
    but pick up the pieces.
     
  7. Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:

    > .... freeride
    > bikes /are/ tougher, but are even more unsuitable for riding on the
    > road.


    Why do you say that ?

    After reading the enthusiastic comments about the Specialized Tricross here,
    I'm considering buying one as a sort of faster hybrid. The Trek hybrid I
    tried seemed disappointingly slow and heavy even compared with my ancient,
    cheap, Raleigh.

    I'm actually after a light day tourer, and a Dawes Audax seemed a good
    choice - but while I think it would be good on tarmac, I'm unsure how well
    it would cope with gravelly NCN paths etc.

    The Tricross might be a bit limited in gearing range, but that strikes
    me as being easier to fix (at some later stage) than a lack of wheel
    clearance.

    -adrian
     
  8. Random

    Random Guest

    Take a look at the Specialized Hardrock - Very well reviewed and within
    your budget.


    R
     
  9. Rod King

    Rod King Guest

    Tom

    Have a look at the Triban

    They do a model with an 8 speed hub gear for about £300. It got a good
    review in Cycling Plus. Very much a fast urban bike.
    Generally Decathlon offers very good value for money.

    Best regards

    Rod King

    "Tom Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > Afternoon all,
    >
    > I'd like to buy a new bike. I want to spend 200-300 UKP on a mountain
    > bike, which i'll mostly use for commuting to work, on the road, but
    > which'll (hopefully) see plenty more varied use over the summer. I know a
    > hybrid would be logical here, but i've really not been impressed with the
    > ones i've looked at - plus, London roads really need something tougher!
    > I'd prefer rigid forks, since i'm mostly going to be on the road or
    > halfway decent trails, and the kind of boingy fork you get on a 200-300
    > UKP bike is just going to sit there soaking up power and control while i'm
    > doing that.
    >
    > If i go to my local bike shop, they'll sell me a Trek 4300 for 270 UKP. I
    > know this, because that's what they sold me when i was in the same
    > position last year. It was a generally decent bike, and served me well
    > until it got pinched. The chainset somehow felt a bit flimsy, but it never
    > broke or anything, so it was probably all in my mind.
    >
    > However, a friend suggested i try Decathlon, since apparently they're very
    > good value. I've had a look at their website, but the descriptions of the
    > bikes are pretty vague, and they don't give prices. They also don't seem
    > to do much in the way of rigid forks. Moreover, i've never ridden one of
    > their bikes, and have no sense of how good they are. Can anyone enlighten
    > me? Are they good value? What's the build quality like? How's the
    > after-sales service?
    >
    > There is a third option - a slightly-less-local bike shop (a Cycle
    > Surgery) down the road. I have no idea what they've got; their website
    > claims they don't have anything rigid, but amongst the front-sus bikes,
    > it's Marins and Specializeds in my price range - i believe those are good
    > quality, but perhaps not such good value, since you're paying extra for
    > the name. Although they do have a sale on at the moment!
    >
    > So, any thoughts would be most welcome.
    >
    > Ta buckets,
    > tom
    >
    > --
    > Many of us adopted the File's slang as our own, feeling that we'd found a
    > tangible sign of the community of minds we'd half-guessed to be out there.
     
  10. Clive George

    Clive George Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    >> But 26" wheels are tougher than 700s - MTBs tend to get the former,
    >> hybrid/urban/road bikes tend to get the latter.

    >
    > I really don't believe there's a measurable difference. The wheel I
    > crashed into a boulder at 46 miles per hour last October was 700c. The
    > rim's a bit battered, but the wheel is still perfectly true, and still
    > ridable. The difference in dimension between a 26" and a 700c is very
    > small. Furthermore, of course, at any rim braked wheel of any size will
    > be stronger than any disk braked wheel of similar construction, simply
    > because the spokes are at a less acute angle.


    Unfortunately I don't have experience of 700 vs 26" with similar rims on the
    tandem - I think the 26" rims have always been stronger than the 700 ones we
    had (40H mavic mod 4 - but the original ceramics on the MTB were a similar
    profile to that). I've broken two of the 700c rims on remarkably small
    bumps, and none of the 36H 26" ones.

    And your evidence is just as flawed :)

    What are the numbers - who's got a copy of the bicycle wheel to hand? I
    thought it was something like a squared relationship.

    cheers,
    clive
     
  11. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > Furthermore, of course, at any rim braked wheel of any size will
    > be stronger than any disk braked wheel of similar construction, simply
    > because the spokes are at a less acute angle.


    Shirley they are not of a similar construction if the spokes are at a
    less acute angle? e.g. any wheel with a disk hub and braking surfaced
    rim (of which I have a several). There's plenty of space on the lhs of
    rear hubs to fit the rotor mounts without having to move the spoke holes
    at all. There may be a small difference between the lhs position of the
    spoke holes on a front wheel when comparing a disk to a non-disk hub,
    and I take it that this is what you are referring to. This however would
    lead to the front wheel's spokes being very slightly dished, unless you
    happen to have a front rim with offset spoke holes (I do). So, you may
    lose a small amount of side-to-side strength, but nowhere near as much
    as you've already given up on the rear wheel with 9 speed dishing. I CBA
    to go out to the shed at this time in the evening to check the offset
    spoke front rim to see if the front hub also has compensation for the
    movement of the lhs spoke holes by moving the rhs ones to the right, but
    if you're interested, I might tomorrow.

    JimP
     
  12. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    Mark Thompson wrote:
    > > So, any thoughts would be most welcome.

    >
    > As Simon says, any bike will be able to cope with London roads - wheels are
    > very strong, and I haven't damaged my road bike's wheels yet - so that
    > frees you up to look at a wider range of bikes.
    >
    > Sounds like a hybrid would be perfect - can do all the off road stuff and
    > is a _lot_ more suited to the on road stuff.
    >
    > Obvious I know but don't forget the mudguards.


    I rode my road bike round London for many years as a daily commuting
    vehicle. 20mm tyres on wheels I built myself. After 10k miles they were
    less than 1mm out (and I am no lightweight )

    I wouldn't worry about th esize of the wheels - it's how well they are
    built. I prefer a sit up position in cities so would go for a hybrid
    for speed. Having said that, I am splitting the difference with my
    current project. Upgrading my Norwegian single speed bike grandma bike
    to a dynamo hub and epicyclic gears. It has wheels half way between MTB
    and road (584 - or 650C)

    ...d
     
  13. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Adrian Godwin
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> .... freeride
    >> bikes /are/ tougher, but are even more unsuitable for riding on the
    >> road.

    >
    > Why do you say that ?


    6 inches or more of suspension travel at each end does not a good road
    bike make, and that's before you start thinking about weight.

    > After reading the enthusiastic comments about the Specialized Tricross
    > here, I'm considering buying one as a sort of faster hybrid. The Trek
    > hybrid I tried seemed disappointingly slow and heavy even compared with
    > my ancient, cheap, Raleigh.


    Tricross is a really nice bike, recommended. Good for roads, and good for
    the sort of off-road most people actually do. There are other
    mass-produced crossers as well - Giant do one and so do Cannondale. Much
    better as general purpose commute-plus-a-bit-of-off-road bikes than
    mountain bikes are.

    > I'm actually after a light day tourer, and a Dawes Audax seemed a good
    > choice - but while I think it would be good on tarmac, I'm unsure how
    > well it would cope with gravelly NCN paths etc.


    Lighter and probably faster than a Tricross, should be OK on gravel
    provided it's not too loose.

    > The Tricross might be a bit limited in gearing range, but that strikes
    > me as being easier to fix (at some later stage) than a lack of wheel
    > clearance.


    Limited for /what/? You can get up any road hill with Tricross gearing,
    and off-road you'd probably run out of traction or the ability to keep
    the front wheel down before you ran out of gears.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; MS Windows: A thirty-two bit extension ... to a sixteen bit
    ;; patch to an eight bit operating system originally coded for a
    ;; four bit microprocessor and sold by a two-bit company that
    ;; can't stand one bit of competition -- anonymous
     
  14. Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> Why do you say that ?

    >
    > 6 inches or more of suspension travel at each end does not a good road
    > bike make, and that's before you start thinking about weight.


    Ah, that's what I expected you to say about mountain bikes, but you
    also mentioned 'freeride'. Specialized call the Tricross 'freeroad',
    hence my confusion. But it has no suspension, so I guess you weren't
    referring to it there, after all.

    >> I'm actually after a light day tourer, and a Dawes Audax seemed a good
    >> choice - but while I think it would be good on tarmac, I'm unsure how
    >> well it would cope with gravelly NCN paths etc.

    >
    > Lighter and probably faster than a Tricross, should be OK on gravel
    > provided it's not too loose.


    Tricross is 10.9kg (ali), 48/34 chainset, 8 speed 12-25 cassette
    Audax is 11.7 kg (steel), 52/42/30, 9 speed 12-25 cassette.


    >
    >> The Tricross might be a bit limited in gearing range, but that strikes
    >> me as being easier to fix (at some later stage) than a lack of wheel
    >> clearance.

    >
    > Limited for /what/? You can get up any road hill with Tricross gearing,
    > and off-road you'd probably run out of traction or the ability to keep
    > the front wheel down before you ran out of gears.
    >


    My old 10-speed (and my older legs) doesn't have low enough gearing to
    let me spin up a steep hill, but I lack the experience to translate
    the numbers above into real life. So I'm looking for lower ratios but
    don't really know how low. From the above, the Audax appears to have
    about 20% wider gearing range, some at each end (though a Galaxy has
    considerably more) - this makes me think I'm less likely to find it a
    problem. However, the old bike is 25kg, 52/42, 14-26 so either is
    going to be an improvement.

    -adrian
     
  15. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Adrian Godwin
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Tricross is 10.9kg (ali), 48/34 chainset, 8 speed 12-25 cassette
    > Audax is 11.7 kg (steel), 52/42/30, 9 speed 12-25 cassette.
    >
    >>> The Tricross might be a bit limited in gearing range, but that
    >>> strikes me as being easier to fix (at some later stage) than a lack
    >>> of wheel clearance.

    >>
    >> Limited for /what/? You can get up any road hill with Tricross
    >> gearing, and off-road you'd probably run out of traction or the
    >> ability to keep the front wheel down before you ran out of gears.

    >
    > My old 10-speed (and my older legs) doesn't have low enough gearing to
    > let me spin up a steep hill, but I lack the experience to translate
    > the numbers above into real life. So I'm looking for lower ratios but
    > don't really know how low. From the above, the Audax appears to have
    > about 20% wider gearing range, some at each end (though a Galaxy has
    > considerably more) - this makes me think I'm less likely to find it a
    > problem. However, the old bike is 25kg, 52/42, 14-26 so either is
    > going to be an improvement.


    OK:
    Lowest Highest
    Old bike: (42/26)x27 = 43.605 (52/14)x27 = 100.285
    Tricross: (34/25)x27 = 36.72 (48/12)x27 = 108
    Audax: (30/25)x27 = 32.4 (52/12)x27 = 117

    These numbers are 'gear inches', the diameter (in inches) of a penny
    farthing wheel which would travel the same distance for one rotation of
    the pedals. Yes, I know that's arcane, but it's TRADITION and you can't
    change it; it also helps to make gears comparable over widely different
    bikes. The '27' is the diameter in inches of the wheel /with/ /tyre/;
    700c with a 28mm tyre is as near as dammit 27 inches (so is a mountain
    bike wheel with a 2" tyre).

    From this you can clearly see that the bottom gear on the audax is only
    three quarters of the bottom gear on the old bike. But getting 15 Kg off
    the weight of the bike (is your old one /really/ that heavy?) will make
    more difference than you expect!

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; single speed mountain bikes: for people who cycle on flat mountains.
     
  16. Tom Anderson

    Tom Anderson Guest

    On Fri, 24 Mar 2006, Anthony Jones wrote:

    > Tom Anderson wrote:
    >
    >> So, any thoughts would be most welcome.

    >
    > Edinburgh Bicycle Co-op do some nice mountain/hybrid crossover bikes
    > under the Revolution brand.


    Those do look good.

    I don't live anywhere near any of their shops, though, which means i'd
    have to mail order one. Do they ship it in a fully set up condition, or
    would i have to do it myself (or rather, get my LBS to do it, given that
    my mechanical skills are pathetic)?

    tom

    --
    Cthulu saves! (so he can eat you later)
     
  17. Tom Anderson

    Tom Anderson Guest

    On Fri, 24 Mar 2006, Simon Brooke wrote:

    > in message <[email protected]>, Tom
    > Anderson ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    >> I know a hybrid would be logical here, but i've really not been
    >> impressed with the ones i've looked at - plus, London roads really need
    >> something tougher!

    >
    > Oh, help, this is the second one in a week.
    >
    > Mountain bikes are NOT 'tougher' than other bikes.


    But ... but ... they've got stickers and really aggressive names. Surely
    that counts for something?

    Point taken. Isn't there a difference in the design of the freewheel,
    though? I was told at some point that the hubs typically used with hybrids
    are of a lighter but less resilient design.

    tom

    --
    Cthulu saves! (so he can eat you later)
     
  18. Ib

    Ib Guest

    Clive George wrote:
    > "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >> Oh, help, this is the second one in a week.
    >>
    >> Mountain bikes are NOT 'tougher' than other bikes.

    >
    > But 26" wheels are tougher than 700s - MTBs tend to get the former,
    > hybrid/urban/road bikes tend to get the latter.
    >


    There are some nice hybrid bikes out there with 26" wheels, tend to be
    called 'Urban' or 'City', Marin spring to mind. Would give you a more
    MTB look on a road bike.
     
  19. Ib

    Ib Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > OK:
    > Lowest Highest
    > Old bike: (42/26)x27 = 43.605 (52/14)x27 = 100.285
    > Tricross: (34/25)x27 = 36.72 (48/12)x27 = 108
    > Audax: (30/25)x27 = 32.4 (52/12)x27 = 117
    > ...
    > From this you can clearly see that the bottom gear on the audax is only
    > three quarters of the bottom gear on the old bike. But getting 15 Kg off
    > the weight of the bike (is your old one /really/ that heavy?) will make
    > more difference than you expect!
    >


    Hijacking thread slightly. I would love to replace my 20 year-old road
    bike with a Cyclo-cross for all round versatility. But all the
    cyclocross bikes have front doubles so you don't get the gear range of a
    straight bar hybrid.

    I have read that the Sora gears on the Tricross are double specific, so
    not easilly upgraded. What about the Tiagra/105/Ultima shifters on the
    Cannondale/Trek/Focus cross machines?

    Or should I just admit I can't get 1 bike, and buy 2...

    Ib.
     
Loading...
Loading...