Decent Price?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Doki, Mar 4, 2004.

  1. Doki

    Doki Guest

    My local bike hire place are selling off some of their bikes. They're Giant Boulders, yellow and
    blue paintwork if that helps date them. Asking £150 a piece. What do you reckon?
     
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  2. Doki

    Doki Guest

    Doki wrote:
    > My local bike hire place are selling off some of their bikes. They're Giant Boulders, yellow and
    > blue paintwork if that helps date them. Asking £150 a piece. What do you reckon?

    They had front suspension too (just googled and realised some don't) BTW. RST or some such.
     
  3. Doki

    Doki Guest

    Doki wrote:
    > Doki wrote:
    >> My local bike hire place are selling off some of their bikes. They're Giant Boulders, yellow and
    >> blue paintwork if that helps date them. Asking £150 a piece. What do you reckon?
    >
    > They had front suspension too (just googled and realised some don't) BTW. RST or some such.

    Done a bit of looking and I reckon it's one of these: http://tinyurl.com/2bqcf
     
  4. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Doki wrote:

    > They had front suspension too (just googled and realised some don't) BTW. RST or some such.

    At the bottom end of the market suspension isn't necessarily a Good Thing. As well as soak up bumps
    it'll soak up power you're putting in to pedalling, especially if you're standing to get up a hill.
    As well as this, it's another thing that needs maintenance and can go wrong. For road use, unless
    you habitually ride across cobbled streets for miles on end, I'd personally avoid it unless paying
    Real Money as there's more important things for your money to go on.

    But... Giant is a good brand so you're unlikely to end up with anything wretched. But though you
    wouldn't be getting a Lada, you may well be looking at a 1.0 Fiesta with alloy wheels and a Go
    Faster Stripe, in automotive terms.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  5. W K

    W K Guest

    "Doki" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My local bike hire place are selling off some of their bikes. They're
    Giant
    > Boulders, yellow and blue paintwork if that helps date them. Asking £150 a piece. What do
    > you reckon?

    Thats what they cost, and that is pretty much what they are worth. It has often been said here, that
    you don't get much of a bike for less than 250 quid. However, if you don't want to go to that much,
    they seem to be pretty much as good as you get for this price, and they are a nice step up from the
    standard superstore type bikes. One recommendation: the only mountain bike I saw when I went to
    holland was a Giant Boulder (but the blue Al one, I believe the yellow ones are cro-mo steel).

    Its a shame they don't do them without suspension any more, because it would have otherwise been a
    rather good cheap and cheerful bike.

    .... as for the fiesta analogy, I'd agree. But of course whether you buy the "1.0 fiesta" or the
    "ferrari F40" of the bike world, you'll find they still come with the same engine options.
     
  6. Doki

    Doki Guest

    W K wrote:
    > "Doki" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> My local bike hire place are selling off some of their bikes. They're Giant Boulders, yellow and
    >> blue paintwork if that helps date them. Asking £150 a piece. What do you reckon?
    >
    > Thats what they cost, and that is pretty much what they are worth. It has often been said here,
    > that you don't get much of a bike for less than 250 quid. However, if you don't want to go to
    > that much, they seem to be pretty much as good as you get for this price, and they are a nice
    > step up from the standard superstore type bikes. One recommendation: the only mountain bike I saw
    > when I went to holland was a Giant Boulder (but the blue Al one, I believe the yellow ones are
    > cro-mo steel).

    After looking around a bit it looks like they're on a couple of websites new around the £220 mark.
    According to the Giant site the bike is Alu. There's one on ebay now (unwanted gift and all that),
    I'll see what that gets to (assuming ebay bike buyers aren't as daft as some of the other buyers).

    > Its a shame they don't do them without suspension any more, because it would have otherwise been a
    > rather good cheap and cheerful bike.
    >
    > .... as for the fiesta analogy, I'd agree. But of course whether you buy the "1.0 fiesta" or the
    > "ferrari F40" of the bike world, you'll find they still come with the same engine options.

    That's pretty much what I was thinking. I'm not sure why there's such an obsession with making the
    bike really light. Maybe it'd matter more if I were 7 stone ;).
     
  7. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    "Doki" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > That's pretty much what I was thinking. I'm not sure why there's such an obsession with making the
    > bike really light. Maybe it'd matter more if I were 7 stone ;).

    It does make it easier to accelerate and to carry, but more importantly the lighter bikes tend to
    feel nicer and to reward your effort.

    cheers, clive
     
  8. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    "Doki" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >> That's pretty much what I was thinking. I'm not sure why there's such an obsession with making
    > >> the bike really light. Maybe it'd matter more if I were 7 stone ;).
    > >
    > > It does make it easier to accelerate and to carry, but more importantly the lighter bikes tend
    > > to feel nicer and to reward your effort.
    >
    > Shell optimax makes my car go faster (despite it not having a knock
    sensor)
    > and the shiny OFC copper free wires on my hifi make it sound so much
    clearer
    > ;). I can see how weight savings in the drivetrain and wheels will make
    the
    > bike easier to ride, but you'd need to be removing serious amounts of
    weight
    > from the frame for it to make much difference to the average rider at 12 stone or so. I can
    > believe that a good bike will last longer than your average cheap one before bits drop off mind.

    Weight savings in the frame count as much as weight savings in the drivetrain and wheels for
    hillclimbing/carrying (half rim savings for acceleration, otherwise the same for the rest).

    The real difference is in the feel - there is obviously significantly more potential to notice the
    difference if you're swinging the bike beneath you while sprinting, as your body weight is
    irrelevant in this situation.

    cheers, clive
     
  9. Gawnsoft

    Gawnsoft Guest

    On Thu, 04 Mar 2004 14:09:38 +0000, Peter Clinch
    <[email protected]> wrote (more or less):

    >Doki wrote:

    >At the bottom end of the market suspension isn't necessarily a Good Thing. As well as soak up bumps
    >it'll soak up power you're putting in to pedalling, especially if you're standing to get up a hill.

    Is this true? I only ask as originally pneumatic tyres were frowned on as soaking up effort, and
    they're actually more efficient than solid tyres.

    Cheers, Euan Gawnsoft: http://www.gawnsoft.co.sr Symbian/Epoc wiki: http://html.dnsalias.net:1122
    Smalltalk links (harvested from comp.lang.smalltalk) http://html.dnsalias.net/gawnsoft/smalltalk
     
  10. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Gawnsoft wrote:

    > Is this true? I only ask as originally pneumatic tyres were frowned on as soaking up effort, and
    > they're actually more efficient than solid tyres.

    Pneumatic tyres make life better by deforming the tyres over small deviations while the frame and
    rider stay more static in the vertical. This means less energy gets converted from going forwards to
    going up and down. Good roadgoing suspension works on the same principal, and if you ride behind a
    bike with good road suspension you can easily see how the frame stays far more still than the
    wheels. On a perfectly smooth surface a solid tyre would be better, but roads tend not to be
    perfectly smooth. Note how rollerbladers use solid wheels, but stick to the smoothest paths.

    But cheap suspension is made with the primary goal of looking like expensive suspension rather than
    to soak up small deviations in the road surface. It also tends to be modelled on chunky MTB
    suspension which is there to soak up major shocks rather than lots of small ones, and the
    combination of these factors means that the frame tends to bounce up and down more rather than less,
    which steals the energy you put in through the pedals.

    Note how high end MTB forks can often be locked out on the fly for when the rider is climbing. And
    also note how much the UK market's low end is dedicated to looking like sports machinery rather than
    what actually doing what works best as a utility machine.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
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