Decent set of spd pedals?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by cwwoodley, May 25, 2007.

  1. cwwoodley

    cwwoodley New Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2007
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    As above really, im new on here and just bought my new road bike (entry level) and i would like to upgrade the pedals to spd (clip on) ones, dont really want to spend a fortune but is there any makes or styles i should lean towards or stay well clear of?

    any help would be diamond, cheers xx
     
    Tags:


  2. WoodLark

    WoodLark New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Technically speaking, only Shimano pedals are "SPD". Others however may be copies of the Shimano SPD mechanism and most MTB clipless pedals use the SPD mounting hole pattern. Personally, I was not impressed by SPD as I found them hard to clip in and out of (YMMV). For clipless pedals, I prefer Crank Brothers "Eggbeaters" or their variants or Bebops. Both brands offer more float than the SPD pedals (especially the Bebops). I have also heard good things about Speedplay pedals although I have never tried them myself.

    Note that depending on the pedals and shoes that you end up buying, you may have to do some trimming on the soles of the shoes in order for the clipping mechanism to work properly. It can be upsetting to do surgery on a new pair of shoes, but can easily be done (carefully) with a Dremel tool or a utility knife.

    Use some grease on the cleat threads and tighten them down so that they can't move when you try to clip out. You may have to play with the cleat position (forward/backward, side-to-side, and angle) on the bottom of the shoe to get the most comfort and best release action.

    Practice using the pedals in a "soft landing" area until you are used to them. The first time I rode clipless pedals and forgot to clip out I fell on concrete and split my helmet and ended up with a three-day headache.

    Best of luck!:)
     
  3. OoAmericanGirl

    OoAmericanGirl New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    0
    Woodlard is right, they're harder to get in and out of than road pedals. I had them for about 2 years (2 different pedal sets) and I would get hung up alot, I always thought that I didn't have the skill. I switched to road pedals in the winter and I haven't had the slightest problem getting in and out.
     
  4. lwedge

    lwedge New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2004
    Messages:
    1,552
    Likes Received:
    2
    Crank Bothers Candies\Quatro. Click in ..... Click out....

    Great price, great pedal.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. WoodLark

    WoodLark New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    I know I am overweight, but it is "Woodlark", not "Woodlard":eek:
     
  6. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Messages:
    3,522
    Likes Received:
    3
    Those Crank Bros look nice.

    Shimano have a nice one too, PD-A520:
     
  7. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2004
    Messages:
    12,596
    Likes Received:
    161
    First, current Shimano SPD road pedals are actually a copy of Look's pedal....well, at least that's how they started, as a licensed copy. Shimano has since made some modifications. At any rate, mtn. SPD is entirely different.

    As for pedals, Look, Time, Speedplay, Shimano, Campy (made until last year. no longer in production.), Crank Bros all make good pedals. The only reason to steer clear of any of them is personal preference.

    The functionality of Performance, Wellgo, and Magura pedals, however, seems to be in question, with some users hating them very much.
     
  8. WoodLark

    WoodLark New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    I should have made it clear above that I was speaking about my experiences with MTB pedals; I have never had any personal experience with Shimano (or any other brand) road pedals. From hearsay, the Shimano road pedals are very good, but like all road pedals are hard to walk in when you get off the bike (which is why I've never used them).

    Also, in fairness, the SPD pedals I did try were not made by Shimano, but were a copy sold under the Nashbar brand name (I don't know who actually made them). It may be that the quality of Shimano SPD pedals is so much better than those that I would have not had the problems that I experienced.
     
  9. pistole

    pistole New Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2007
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    0
    - clipless pedals will teach you the most important basics of pedalling, cadence and foot positioning. And when you learn these early on , you won't develope bad habits.

    - its just the learning curve you need to get over.

    - shimano road pedals (whether from the humble R540 all the way up to the DuraAce unit) will be just fine.

    - just make sure when you start out that the tension is adjusted to its lowest position.

    - and do remember that cleat-positioning (the big plastic thing that is screwed to the underside of the shoe) is very important too.

    cheers.
    .
     
  10. Rustyhole

    Rustyhole New Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2007
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have Shimano SPD compatible pedals on both bikes: Shimano M545 on my roadie / M424 on the MTB. these pedals are pretty much identical except the 545 cage is chrome whereas the 424 is black chromoly. they are clipless on both sides and a cage to allow for riding w/o clips (can't really) as the clip is set at angle in relation to cage so riding is hard as feet don't want ot stay on pedal w/o clips. I've had no probs with getting in or out

    yes Shimano MTB pedals still use the older SPD clips whereas the roadies use the newer SPD-SL (except the A520)
     
  11. Camilo

    Camilo New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2007
    Messages:
    391
    Likes Received:
    4
    Aren't the current shimano road pedals (with the larger cleats) actually called SPD-L? or some such thing? It is true that Shimano doesn't seem to currently make regular SPD road pedals - although I have an older pair which are road pedals (one sided, more "aero" look) with the standard SPD cleat. They have worked extremely well and are I think 10 years old. I like them and use them with a decent, stiff pair of MTB shoes and am very happy with this set up.

    Next set of pedals I get will be probalby the Crank Bro's pedal displayed in a message above, because I have yet to discover any reason I'm unhappy with the recessed cleat / MTB set up. But then again, I've never ridden with a larger road-type cleat.
     
  12. pistole

    pistole New Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2007
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    0
    spd - mountain.

    spd-SL - road
     
  13. cwwoodley

    cwwoodley New Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2007
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    yeah those little eggbeaters are a sexy bit of kit, i was looking at the crank brothers "egg beaters c clipless" or crank brothers "smarty clipless" both about the same price, would i need to stick to one make of shoe, or do the all interchange as the basic clip in and out is the same, (shimano pedals/shoes)?

    both the pedals seem to be very small compared to the "road" pedals like the shimanos or time pedals, would it be easier to get a bigger pedal platform as i havent used the clip in/out for a long time and it was on a mtb bike?
     
  14. WoodLark

    WoodLark New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Most good cycling shoes have a rigid enough sole that you really don't need the platform. The platform on the Crank Bros. Candy, Smarty and Quattro pedals is primarily for those times you want to hop on the bike for a short run in regular (non-cycling) shoes. Basically all (most?) brands of MTB shoes have mounting holes compatible with SPD cleats (also used by Crank Bros. and other makers of MTB pedals). Most road shoes have mounting compatible with Look or Shimano SPD-SL cleats.

    Note that while the shoes are pretty much interchangeable between brands of pedals, the cleats are not (they will come with the pedals).
     
  15. artemidorus

    artemidorus New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2004
    Messages:
    2,307
    Likes Received:
    0
    Not sure that this is true. Pro road cyclists that use the Crank Bros pedals have the ones with platforms.
     
  16. vascdoc

    vascdoc New Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2005
    Messages:
    225
    Likes Received:
    0
    I recommend a pedal with some float. Typically SPD pedals have no float. There are many good quality and relatively inexpensive pedals from several companies. A good LBS will let you try a few to experience the feel of the pedal. Evaluate the feel of engaging and release as well as the feel of the pedal during the cycling strokes.
     
  17. artemidorus

    artemidorus New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2004
    Messages:
    2,307
    Likes Received:
    0
    SPD and SPD-SL pedals both have float, although not as much as some.
     
  18. 1id10t

    1id10t New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Messages:
    343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just my two cents -

    I use Crank Bros Eggbeaters, Candy C, Mallets and Quattros. I did this so I could use the same cleat style across my bikes. Therefore, if I felt like using my MTB shoes on the road bike because I wanted to be able to walk around normally I could. Happy with my decision. Pros and cons with each of them though.

    Eggbeaters - Pros: dead easy to clip in/out of. Minimalist and sexy design. Love the WTF factor from people who have never seen them before. Cons: small design = hotspots. Ride long enough with a shoe without a really stiff sole or at least a stiff shim and you'll feel it.
    Candy C - Pros: Platform = a little bit more comfort. Cons: I use it on my commuter so no issues for me. Just wonder about durability off-road as the platform is composite. Would imagine it's okay though as it feels quite sturdy. Can sometimes require a second attempt when trying to clip in. Depending on the shoes the knobs might require a bit of trimming to make clipping in easier.
    Mallets - Pros: Big platform; sturdy design. Great for off-road when you need to dab the foot. You can thn just keep pedalling without clipping in initially and still be able to pedal properly. Cons: clipping in can sometimes take a bit. I use two shims (supplied with the pedals) between the shoe and the cleat. Makes it easier to clip in this way.
    Quattros - Pros: Good size platform. Easier to clip in/out of than SPD-SL and Look (IMHO), double sided road pedal. Very sexy. Cons: I have no problems but have heard some people complain that they cannot clip in/out so easily.

    Other pedals I have owned -
    Shimano M520 - Good pedal. Easy to clip in/out of. Would have kept it but no point after I replaced everything with Crank Bros.
    Look PP96 - Initially I had found these hard to clip into and release. Got easier over time but when riding in traffic I found I couldn't take off as quickly as with the Eggbeaters or even the Quattros. Always had to flip the pedal over first and then try to engage. This could be overcome by learning to trackstand properly (I'm a bit wobbly). Also, many others I know can clip in very quickly without the issues I have; probably a testimony to my clumsiness.
    Shimano 105 SPD-SL - I felt they were similar to the Looks although the cleat has 'wings' which make it easier to walk in without slipping everywhere.
     
  19. sideshow_bob

    sideshow_bob New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2005
    Messages:
    506
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've seen them use both. Though the egg beaters have usually been on climbers bikes. I've trained and raced on both, there is no discernable difference when using the standard cleats.

    --brett
     
  20. lava

    lava New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2005
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    0
    In my opinion my PD-M540s have too much float, even at their least-floaty adjustment.
     
Loading...
Loading...