Decorative Rosemary; edible?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Richard Periut, Dec 17, 2003.

  1. I have purchased a decorative rosemary plant, trimmed in the form of a pine tree.

    I went to their site http://www.pinerytree.com/ to see if they mention if it's edible, but they make
    no mention. They do mention every other use for it.

    There is no e-mail or contact number in the web site.

    I know it's rosemary for sure, but I don't know if they added some resin/chemical for decorative and
    aromatic qualities.

    I would also think that if it were not edible, it should be very clear on the pot it came with.

    TIA,

    Richard

    --
    "..A census taker once tried to test me. I ate his liver with some fava beans and a nice chianti..."

    Hannibal "The Cannibal"

    Silence Of The Lambs 1991
     
    Tags:


  2. Achrist787

    Achrist787 Guest

    >I know it's rosemary for sure, but I don't know if they added some resin/chemical for decorative
    >and aromatic qualities.
    >
    >I would also think that if it were not edible, it should be very clear on the pot it came with.

    If the plant is alive and needs watering, it's doubtful that anything was added to it. Any kind of
    resin or chemical they treated it with would kill the plant. The website gives very specific
    information regarding the care of the plant. Anne

    AAC/AAF/AFBV62.0844.AZ http://www.tckworld.com/opfoot
     
  3. Dennis G .

    Dennis G . Guest

    Richard Periut <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have purchased a decorative rosemary plant, trimmed in the form of a pine tree.
    >
    >I went to their site http://www.pinerytree.com/ to see if they mention if it's edible, but they
    >make no mention. They do mention every other use for it.
    >
    >There is no e-mail or contact number in the web site.
    >
    >I know it's rosemary for sure, but I don't know if they added some resin/chemical for decorative
    >and aromatic qualities.
    >
    >I would also think that if it were not edible, it should be very clear on the pot it came with.
    >
    >TIA,
    >
    >Richard

    Certainly it is edible. But leave it a few weeks in case it was sprayed with insecticide before
    being sold to you.

    Dennis
     
  4. Richard Periut <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have purchased a decorative rosemary plant, trimmed in the form of a pine tree.
    >
    > I went to their site http://www.pinerytree.com/ to see if they mention if it's edible, but they
    > make no mention. They do mention every other use for it.
    >
    > There is no e-mail or contact number in the web site.
    >
    > I know it's rosemary for sure, but I don't know if they added some resin/chemical for decorative
    > and aromatic qualities.
    >
    > I would also think that if it were not edible, it should be very clear on the pot it came with.
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Richard

    Any true rosemary is edible, so long as the nursery didn't do something like treat it with a
    systemic insecticide. Another remote possibility is that it is a non-rosemary such as Westringia,
    which would likewise be not edible.

    Different rosemary varieties have greater or lesser culinary quality: I find the common dwarf
    rosemary to have little flavor (and bad at that), but the tall "Tuscan Blue" to be much more
    aromatic and satisfactory.

    --
    Chris Green
     
  5. Dennis G. wrote:
    > Richard Periut <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I have purchased a decorative rosemary plant, trimmed in the form of a pine tree.
    >>
    >>I went to their site http://www.pinerytree.com/ to see if they mention if it's edible, but they
    >>make no mention. They do mention every other use for it.
    >>
    >>There is no e-mail or contact number in the web site.
    >>
    >>I know it's rosemary for sure, but I don't know if they added some resin/chemical for decorative
    >>and aromatic qualities.
    >>
    >>I would also think that if it were not edible, it should be very clear on the pot it came with.
    >>
    >>TIA,
    >>
    >>Richard
    >
    >
    > Certainly it is edible. But leave it a few weeks in case it was sprayed with insecticide before
    > being sold to you.
    >
    > Dennis

    Thanks all for your comments.

    It would make sense to wait a couple of weeks, since federal laws mandate that pesticides be
    substances that become degradable over a short period of time.

    Richard

    --
    "..A census taker once tried to test me. I ate his liver with some fava beans and a nice chianti..."

    Hannibal "The Cannibal"

    Silence Of The Lambs 1991
     
  6. D.Currie

    D.Currie Guest

    "Christopher Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:c31fa7b[email protected]...
    > Richard Periut <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I have purchased a decorative rosemary plant, trimmed in the form of a pine tree.
    > >
    > > I went to their site http://www.pinerytree.com/ to see if they mention if it's edible, but they
    > > make no mention. They do mention every other use for it.
    > >
    > > There is no e-mail or contact number in the web site.
    > >
    > > I know it's rosemary for sure, but I don't know if they added some resin/chemical for decorative
    > > and aromatic qualities.
    > >
    > > I would also think that if it were not edible, it should be very clear on the pot it came with.
    > >
    > > TIA,
    > >
    > > Richard
    >
    > Any true rosemary is edible, so long as the nursery didn't do something like treat it with a
    > systemic insecticide. Another remote possibility is that it is a non-rosemary such as Westringia,
    > which would likewise be not edible.
    >
    > Different rosemary varieties have greater or lesser culinary quality: I find the common dwarf
    > rosemary to have little flavor (and bad at that), but the tall "Tuscan Blue" to be much more
    > aromatic and satisfactory.
    >
    > --
    > Chris Green

    There are variations of Rosemary that aren't edible as well. I've got a pine-scented rosemary that's
    not edible. As far as whether a plant should be clearly labeled as not edible -- well, most plants
    aren't labeled as to whether they're edible or not.
     
  7. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On 17 Dec 2003 00:43:05 GMT, [email protected]omjunkbloc (AChrist787)
    wrote:

    >>I know it's rosemary for sure, but I don't know if they added some resin/chemical for decorative
    >>and aromatic qualities.
    >>
    >>I would also think that if it were not edible, it should be very clear on the pot it came with.
    >
    >If the plant is alive and needs watering, it's doubtful that anything was added to it. Any kind of
    >resin or chemical they treated it with would kill the plant. The website gives very specific
    >information regarding the care of the plant.

    And if it were unsafe to eat -- sprayed, etc. -- they'd surely include a warning. (Rosmarinus
    officinalis, the type mentioned on the site, is the regular ol' edible herb.)
     
  8. Anna Maria

    Anna Maria Guest

    D.Currie wrote:
    > "Christopher Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Richard Periut <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    >
    >>>
    >>>Richard
    >>
    >>Any true rosemary is edible, so long as the nursery didn't do something like treat it with a
    >>systemic insecticide. Another remote possibility is that it is a non-rosemary such as Westringia,
    >>which would likewise be not edible.
    >>
    >>Different rosemary varieties have greater or lesser culinary quality: I find the common dwarf
    >>rosemary to have little flavor (and bad at that), but the tall "Tuscan Blue" to be much more
    >>aromatic and satisfactory.
    >>
    >>--
    >>Chris Green
    >
    >
    > There are variations of Rosemary that aren't edible as well. I've got a pine-scented rosemary
    > that's not edible. As far as whether a plant should be clearly labeled as not edible -- well, most
    > plants aren't labeled as to whether they're edible or not.
    >
    >

    i never heard of non edible rosmary. do you have more information about this? thank you, anna maria

    www.annamariavolpi.com
     
  9. "Richard Periut" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Dennis G. wrote:
    > > Richard Periut <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>I have purchased a decorative rosemary plant, trimmed in the form of a pine tree.
    > >>
    > >>I went to their site http://www.pinerytree.com/ to see if they mention if it's edible, but they
    > >>make no mention. They do mention every other use for it.
    > >>
    > >>There is no e-mail or contact number in the web site.
    > >>
    > >>I know it's rosemary for sure, but I don't know if they added some resin/chemical for decorative
    > >>and aromatic qualities.
    > >>
    > >>I would also think that if it were not edible, it should be very clear on the pot it came with.
    > >>
    > >>TIA,
    > >>
    > >>Richard
    They say the Dipel is the insecticide to use for problems, so I guess you can assume that your plant
    has been treated with that. And they say that although rosemary has been a culinary herb for
    centuries, consumption of any raw plant is not recommended? I'd say they are protecting their legal
    backsides. Rosemary that is fresh to the indoors is extremely aromatic, so I doubt that your
    rosemary has been treated in any way to increase its scent. However, rosemary can be extremely
    tricky to keep indoors over winter. It easily gets fungus that cause black spots on old growth and a
    furry white fungus on tender new growth. You've got to have the light, soil and watering conditions
    just right indoors. I succeeded with one plant for many years until it got so big I couldn't lift it
    into the tub to water it any longer. Since then I have not had success. Good luck. Janet
     
  10. Janet Bostwick wrote:
    > "Richard Periut" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Dennis G. wrote:
    >>
    >>>Richard Periut <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I have purchased a decorative rosemary plant, trimmed in the form of a pine tree.
    >>>>
    >>>>I went to their site http://www.pinerytree.com/ to see if they mention if it's edible, but they
    >>>>make no mention. They do mention every other use for it.
    >>>>
    >>>>There is no e-mail or contact number in the web site.
    >>>>
    >>>>I know it's rosemary for sure, but I don't know if they added some resin/chemical for decorative
    >>>>and aromatic qualities.
    >>>>
    >>>>I would also think that if it were not edible, it should be very clear on the pot it came with.
    >>>>
    >>>>TIA,
    >>>>
    >>>>Richard
    >>>
    > They say the Dipel is the insecticide to use for problems, so I guess you can assume that your
    > plant has been treated with that. And they say that although rosemary has been a culinary herb for
    > centuries, consumption of any raw plant is not recommended? I'd say they are protecting their
    > legal backsides. Rosemary that is fresh to the indoors is extremely aromatic, so I doubt that your
    > rosemary has been treated in any way to increase its scent. However, rosemary can be extremely
    > tricky to keep indoors over winter. It easily gets fungus that cause black spots on old growth and
    > a furry white fungus on tender new growth. You've got to have the light, soil and watering
    > conditions just right indoors. I succeeded with one plant for many years until it got so big I
    > couldn't lift it into the tub to water it any longer. Since then I have not had success. Good
    > luck. Janet
    >
    >

    Thanks all for your comments.

    When I meant "not edible" I meant not to be used for cooking because it has possibly been treated
    with some chemical.

    Well, I'm going to use it in a week to roast a chicken. I'll mince up some rosemary and with some
    lemon zest, s&p, oregano and some thyme and butter, and I'll stuff it under the skin.

    I guess if you never hear from me again, you know what happened ; )

    Richard

    --
    "..A census taker once tried to test me. I ate his liver with some fava beans and a nice chianti..."

    Hannibal "The Cannibal"

    Silence Of The Lambs 1991
     
  11. D.Currie

    D.Currie Guest

    "anna maria" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > D.Currie wrote:
    > > "Christopher Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > >>Richard Periut <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >
    > >
    > >>>
    > >>>Richard
    > >>
    > >>Any true rosemary is edible, so long as the nursery didn't do something like treat it with a
    > >>systemic insecticide. Another remote possibility is that it is a non-rosemary such as
    > >>Westringia, which would likewise be not edible.
    > >>
    > >>Different rosemary varieties have greater or lesser culinary quality: I find the common dwarf
    > >>rosemary to have little flavor (and bad at that), but the tall "Tuscan Blue" to be much more
    > >>aromatic and satisfactory.
    > >>
    > >>--
    > >>Chris Green
    > >
    > >
    > > There are variations of Rosemary that aren't edible as well. I've got a pine-scented rosemary
    > > that's not edible. As far as whether a plant
    should be
    > > clearly labeled as not edible -- well, most plants aren't labeled as to whether they're edible
    > > or not.
    > >
    > >
    >
    > i never heard of non edible rosmary. do you have more information about this? thank you,
    > anna maria
    >
    >
    > www.annamariavolpi.com
    >

    I bought it at a nursery that had all sorts of interesting plant variations, including at least a
    half-dozen types of rosemary. Different scents, different leaf variations. This one in particular
    looks like a regular rosemary plant, but has a very strong pine scent. It smells more like pine than
    pine does, and gives off the scent very easily. No need to crush or mangle the leaves, you just
    brush against it, and you get a good whiff. Just watering it, and I smell the pine.

    The label on it said that it wasn't for eating but was great for sachets and potpourri. I don't know
    that it's actually poisonous, but it probably doesn't taste very good. They had quite a few plants
    that you'd normally think of as culinary or medicinal plants that were odd variations that were
    intended to be used for the scents only.

    I don't know the botanical name of my plant, but I know it was in the rosemary family. Maybe if they
    have them again next year, I'll get more information. If I go back there again, that is. Last spring
    it got a bit costly with all the interesting things I found....

    Donna
     
  12. "D.Currie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I bought it at a nursery that had all sorts of interesting plant
    variations,
    > including at least a half-dozen types of rosemary. Different scents, different leaf variations.
    > This one in particular looks like a regular rosemary plant, but has a very strong pine scent. It
    > smells more like pine than pine does, and gives off the scent very easily. No need to crush or
    > mangle the leaves, you just brush against it, and you get a good whiff.
    Just
    > watering it, and I smell the pine.
    >
    > The label on it said that it wasn't for eating but was great for sachets
    and
    > potpourri. I don't know that it's actually poisonous, but it probably doesn't taste very good.
    > They had quite a few plants that you'd normally think of as culinary or medicinal plants that were
    > odd variations that
    were
    > intended to be used for the scents only.
    >
    > I don't know the botanical name of my plant, but I know it was in the rosemary family. Maybe if
    > they have them again next year, I'll get more information. If I go back there again, that is. Last
    > spring it got a bit costly with all the interesting things I found....
    >
    > Donna
    While I have never heard of a rosemary that is not edible, I do know that various edible varieties
    are described in catalogs as being more or less resinous(piney). Some of the rosemary plants that
    I have and eat from are almost a sticky to the touch as pine. They have a very piney smell. Good
    Luck Janet
     
  13. D.Currie

    D.Currie Guest

    "Janet Bostwick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "D.Currie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > berlin.de...
    > > I bought it at a nursery that had all sorts of interesting plant
    > variations,
    > > including at least a half-dozen types of rosemary. Different scents, different leaf variations.
    > > This one in particular looks like a regular rosemary plant, but has a very strong pine scent. It
    > > smells more like
    pine
    > > than pine does, and gives off the scent very easily. No need to crush or mangle the leaves, you
    > > just brush against it, and you get a good whiff.
    > Just
    > > watering it, and I smell the pine.
    > >
    > > The label on it said that it wasn't for eating but was great for sachets
    > and
    > > potpourri. I don't know that it's actually poisonous, but it probably doesn't taste very good.
    > > They had quite a few plants that you'd normally think of as culinary or medicinal plants that
    > > were odd variations that
    > were
    > > intended to be used for the scents only.
    > >
    > > I don't know the botanical name of my plant, but I know it was in the rosemary family. Maybe if
    > > they have them again next year, I'll get more information. If I go back there again, that is.
    > > Last spring it got a bit costly with all the interesting things I found....
    > >
    > > Donna
    > While I have never heard of a rosemary that is not edible, I do know that various edible varieties
    > are described in catalogs as being more or less resinous(piney). Some of the rosemary plants that
    > I have and eat from are almost a sticky to the touch as pine. They have a very piney smell. Good
    > Luck Janet
    >
    Well, I don't think I'll start gnawing on this particular plant any time soon. Next year if they
    have them again, maybe I'll take a closer look at the details.
     
  14. Jlove98905

    Jlove98905 Guest

    I recently purchased a new keyboard, which, I kid you not, came with a warning label. Something
    about the risk of wrist injury.

    My point is, if something isn't 100% idiot-proof, the government will probably force the
    manufacturer to put a warning label on it. So I would think that if rosemary were for some reason
    inedible, you'd be given a warning. You're smart to take precautions anyway - I would have assumed
    it was fine to eat, which is probably why they put warning labels on keyboards :) -Jen Half the
    people you know are below average. -Steven Wright
     
  15. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest

    [email protected] (JLove98905) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > You're smart to take precautions anyway - I would have assumed it was fine to eat, which is
    > probably why they put warning labels on keyboards :) -Jen Half the people you know are below
    > average. -Steven Wright
    >

    Don't eat your keyboard...

    --
    And the beet goes on! (or under) -me just a while ago
     
  16. hahabogus <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Don't eat your keyboard...

    And don't try to touch type on a rosemary plant. They're prickly.

    My mail address is jsachs177 at earthlink dot net.
     
  17. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (JLove98905) writes:

    >I recently purchased a new keyboard, which, I kid you not, came with a warning label. Something
    >about the risk of wrist injury.
    >
    >My point is, if something isn't 100% idiot-proof, the government will probably force the
    >manufacturer to put a warning label on it. So I would think that if rosemary were for some reason
    >inedible, you'd be given a warning. You're smart to take precautions anyway - I would have assumed
    >it was fine to eat, which is probably why they put warning labels on Italian wimmen's pussys :)

    hehe

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  18. Jlove98905

    Jlove98905 Guest

    although it's sadly now unrelated to the original topic, I must aver that I did NOT write this (see
    below), for the record. I don't wanna get killfiled.

    -jen

    >You're
    >>smart to take precautions anyway - I would have assumed it was fine to eat, which is probably why
    >>they put warning labels on Italian wimmen's pussys :)
    >

    Half the people you know are below average. -Steven Wright
     
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