Della Santa

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Dave Thompson, Jan 22, 2003.

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  1. In my travels, I came across a Della Santa Gran Corsa. I had never seen one before, but it sure was
    pretty. It looked to be about 10~15 years old, based on how it was equipped with Campy dt shifters
    and 7-speed cogset. I was told about Della Santa's relationship with LeMond, but can anyone shed
    some more light on this brand? This bike may be something I want to buy.

    --
     
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  2. >. I was told about Della Santa's relationship with LeMond, but can anyone shed some more light on
    > this brand?

    Well, since no one more knowledgeable has jumped in yet, I can mention that Roland Della Santa is a
    major framebuilder. He's been profiled in at least some of the major bike mags over the years, and
    he operates out of one of the Western states, I believe. Since you're thinking of buying, be sure
    the bike you're looking at is the right size for you.

    Joe
     
  3. Bfd

    Bfd Guest

    [email protected] (Joseph Kubera) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > >. I was told about Della Santa's relationship with LeMond, but can anyone shed some more light on
    > > this brand?
    >
    > Well, since no one more knowledgeable has jumped in yet, I can mention that Roland Della Santa is
    > a major framebuilder. He's been profiled in at least some of the major bike mags over the years,
    > and he operates out of one of the Western states, I believe. Since you're thinking of buying, be
    > sure the bike you're looking at is the right size for you.
    >
    Agree, Della Santa is one of the premier steel framebuilders, in the same class as Richard Sachs,
    Albert Eisentraut, Richard Moon, Rivendell and many others. Della Santa operates out of Reno, NV
    (where Greg L grew up) and was a major influence on Greg. For more on Della Santa, see here:
    http://www.classicrendezvous.com/USA/dellasanta_main.htm For more on Greg's relationship with Della
    Santa, get a copy of Greg's book....
     
  4. [email protected] (bfd) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Agree, Della Santa is one of the premier steel framebuilders, in the same class as Richard Sachs,
    > Albert Eisentraut, Richard Moon, Rivendell and many others.

    How has Grant Petersen (sp?) gained a reputation as a frame builder with Rivendell? He doesn't make
    frames, others make them for him, like Match, Waterford, etc. Grant was/is a product manager. That's
    not a bad thing, mind you. --Jim
     
  5. Bfd

    Bfd Guest

    [email protected] (Meccanico di Bici) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (bfd) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Agree, Della Santa is one of the premier steel framebuilders, in the same class as Richard
    > > Sachs, Albert Eisentraut, Richard Moon, Rivendell and many others.
    >
    > How has Grant Petersen (sp?) gained a reputation as a frame builder with Rivendell? He doesn't
    > make frames, others make them for him, like Match, Waterford, etc. Grant was/is a product manager.
    > That's not a bad thing, mind you.
    >
    True, GP doesn't build his own frames, he only designs them. What GP brings to the table is his
    ability to design a frame that probably makes more sense for most riders than the current trend of
    compact/integrated headset/big downtube/"smallest is best" cookie cutters frames coming out of
    taiwan under an italian name and that is on the market today. GP's design "focus" is more late
    70s/early 80s sport touring geometry or 1950s club racer style that has a "fist full of seatpost",
    quite contrary to what most shops market/sell/"fit" to today's riders.....GP also has the ability to
    find arguably two of the best steel frame builders around - Joe Starck and Curt Goodrich. Add all
    that together and Rivendell qualifies, at least to many, as being one of the premier steel
    framebuilders....
     
  6. Bfd

    Bfd Guest

    [email protected] (bfd) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (Meccanico di Bici) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > [email protected]m (bfd) wrote in message
    > > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > Agree, Della Santa is one of the premier steel framebuilders, in the same class as Richard
    > > > Sachs, Albert Eisentraut, Richard Moon, Rivendell and many others.
    > >
    > > How has Grant Petersen (sp?) gained a reputation as a frame builder with Rivendell? He doesn't
    > > make frames, others make them for him, like Match, Waterford, etc. Grant was/is a product
    > > manager. That's not a bad thing, mind you.
    > >
    > True, GP doesn't build his own frames, he only designs them. What GP brings to the table is his
    > ability to design a frame that probably makes more sense for most riders than the current trend of
    > compact/integrated headset/big downtube/"smallest is best" cookie cutters frames coming out of
    > taiwan under an italian name and that is on the market today. GP's design "focus" is more late
    > 70s/early 80s sport touring geometry or 1950s club racer style that has a "fist full of seatpost",
    > quite contrary to what most shops market/sell/"fit" to today's riders.....GP also has the ability
    > to find arguably two of the best steel frame builders around - Joe Starck and Curt Goodrich. Add
    > all that together and Rivendell qualifies, at least to many, as being one of the premier steel
    > framebuilders....

    One more thing, in addition to the above, GP will also custom select tubing to match not only his
    "criterias", but also a person's individual requirements. This is very similar to what Richard Sachs
    and Albert Eisentraut do. The result is you don't get a specific frame sticker, i.e., all Reynolds
    5xx or 7xx tubing, but a bike that has a variety of tubing from Reynolds, Columbus, Vitus, Dedacciai
    (sp?), True Temper, Starlight and more....
     
  7. > > True, GP doesn't build his own frames, he only designs them. What GP brings to the table is his
    > > ability to design a frame that probably makes more sense for most riders than the current trend
    > > of compact/integrated headset/big downtube/"smallest is best" cookie cutters frames coming out
    > > of taiwan under an italian name and that is on the market today. GP's design "focus" is more
    > > late 70s/early 80s sport touring geometry or 1950s club racer style that has a "fist full of
    > > seatpost", quite contrary to what most shops market/sell/"fit" to today's riders.....GP also has
    > > the ability to find arguably two of the best steel frame builders around - Joe Starck and Curt
    > > Goodrich. Add all that together and Rivendell qualifies, at least to many, as being one of the
    > > premier steel framebuilders....
    >
    > One more thing, in addition to the above, GP will also custom select tubing to match not only his
    > "criterias", but also a person's individual requirements. This is very similar to what Richard
    > Sachs and Albert Eisentraut do. The result is you don't get a specific frame sticker, i.e., all
    > Reynolds 5xx or 7xx tubing, but a bike that has a variety of tubing from Reynolds, Columbus,
    > Vitus, Dedacciai (sp?), True Temper, Starlight and more....

    There is no doubt that Rivendell's are good frames, well built by good frame builders. I've
    assembled a couple from various previous builders and they were quite nice, indeed. ( unless things
    have changed, Grant contracts out his frame production ). I liked what Grant did at Bridgestone, and
    what he offers at Rivendell is a great alternative to the marketing driven jive that's flooding
    shops today. There are many good builders around the country that offer great "personalized" product
    like Rivendell. All I was saying is Grant isn't a framebuilder ( think welding mask and torch in
    hand ). He is a damn good product manager, and runs a fine company and has very good people making
    his products. --Jim
     
  8. Joseph Clark

    Joseph Clark New Member

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    Roland Della Santa has made 2 frames for me in the past and he is starting on my 3rd frame. I have talked with other builders of Roland’s level such as Sachs and Wygul( Hopefully I that was the proper spelling of his last name) and feel that Roland undercharges for his frame and once ordered you can receive a custom frame in a quarter of the time of his counterparts.
    Personally I feel for the quality, price, and time wait Roland Della Santa is best value in a Master Frame Builder in the US, bar none!!
     
  9. Jim Beam

    Jim Beam Guest

    Roland Della Santa is best value in a Master Frame Builder in the
    > US, bar none!!

    Even if you disregard the "value" part he's the best for my money.

    I've seen & ridden a lot of frames. Fancy lugs, composites, alloy, ti,
    - all go out the window the moment you ride a Della Santa. You have arrived.

    Jim
     
  10. JonHickok

    JonHickok New Member

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    Hi,
    New to group, but proud owner of a Della Santa Corsa Speciale. I'm wondering what the bike is worth. I came upon it a year ago on ebay and snapped it up. It's Dura Ace grupo with Campy wheels. Down tube mounted shifters. Caramel color. I'm considering doing more touring and may sell it. I might contact Roland and see if there is a collector's market so it could stay in the family. Any thoughts or comments?
    Thanks.
    Jon.H




     
  11. Patrick W.

    Patrick W. Guest

    > Hi, New to group, but proud owner of a Della Santa Corsa Speciale. I'm wondering what the bike is
    > worth. I came upon it a year ago on ebay and snapped it up. It's Dura Ace grupo with Campy wheels.
    > Down tube mounted shifters. Caramel color. I'm considering doing more touring and may sell
    > it. I might contact Roland and see if there is a collector's market so it could stay in the
    > family. Any thoughts or comments? Thanks. Jon.H

    IIRC, the frames go for around $1250 if you buy directly from Roland, add a couple hundred more if
    you go through a shop. FWIW I'm not aware of any "collector's market" for Della Santa bikes like
    there are for older Masis, etc. If I were you, I'd just ride it!

    -Patrick
     
  12. Bfd

    Bfd Guest

    "Patrick W." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Hi, New to group, but proud owner of a Della Santa Corsa Speciale. I'm wondering what the
    > > bike is worth. I came upon it a year ago on ebay and snapped it up. It's Dura Ace grupo with
    > > Campy wheels. Down tube mounted shifters. Caramel color. I'm considering doing more touring
    > > and may sell
    > > it. I might contact Roland and see if there is a collector's market so it could stay in the
    > > family. Any thoughts or comments? Thanks. Jon.H
    >
    > IIRC, the frames go for around $1250 if you buy directly from Roland, add a couple hundred more if
    > you go through a shop. FWIW I'm not aware of any "collector's market" for Della Santa bikes like
    > there are for older Masis, etc. If I were you, I'd just ride it!
    >
    Agree, the "collector's market" is currently for older Italian made frames like Masi, Colnago,
    Cinelli, etc. However, I would argue that American made frames are as good, if not better, than most
    Italian frames (OK, that wine colored/white panel Colnago is too pretty). Della Santa is in upper
    level of American framebuilders. In fact, I would put him in the same class as Richard Sachs, Albert
    Eisentraut, Richard Moon, Columbine, Rivendell's 2 builders - Joe Starck and Curt Goodrich to name a
    few. I would also agree that you should keep the bike and ride it.
     
  13. JonHickok

    JonHickok New Member

    Joined:
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    Thank you!
     
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