Derailleur

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by soup, Oct 3, 2004.

  1. soup

    soup Guest

    Spent 3~4 hours adjusting my rear "Derailleur" but whatever
    I did, couldn't get the gear change at both ends at once if I
    manged to get a smooth change at low gears couldn't get
    it onto the highest cog if I got a smooth change at the high
    gears then I couldn't get it to change to the lowest cog ,
    was in a quandry then thought, I know I will look on
    Sheldon's site as I am obviously doing something wrong.
    There staring at me is "before adjusting anything check
    the rear "Derailleur" isn't bent" I was adjusting it in the
    correct way but the rear derailleur had been dinged
    and was curved rather than straight compared to
    the "Derailleur" on my road bike . So tried to swap
    the "Derailleur" on my road bike over to the ATB
    got both "Derailleurs" loose and 'de-cabled' only
    too find I can't locate my chain spliter (chain tool)
    so will have to make a trip to the LBS tomorow
    and get a new one will re-assemble and let you know
    how I got on.

    --
    yours S

    Nihil curo de ista tua stulta superstitione
     
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  2. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, soup
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Spent 3~4 hours adjusting my rear "Derailleur" but whatever
    > I did, couldn't get the gear change at both ends at once if I
    > manged to get a smooth change at low gears couldn't get
    > it onto the highest cog if I got a smooth change at the high
    > gears then I couldn't get it to change to the lowest cog ,
    > was in a quandry then thought, I know I will look on
    > Sheldon's site as I am obviously doing something wrong.
    > There staring at me is "before adjusting anything check
    > the rear "Derailleur" isn't bent" I was adjusting it in the
    > correct way but the rear derailleur had been dinged
    > and was curved rather than straight compared to
    > the "Derailleur" on my road bike . So tried to swap
    > the "Derailleur" on my road bike over to the ATB
    > got both "Derailleurs" loose and 'de-cabled' only
    > too find I can't locate my chain spliter (chain tool)
    > so will have to make a trip to the LBS tomorow
    > and get a new one will re-assemble and let you know
    > how I got on.


    You can take a deraileur off a chain without splitting it by removing
    the two little bolts which are the axles for the jockey wheels (the
    cage will come apart). While it's apart grease the bushes - the little
    metal sleeves the bolts go through on which the wheels actually turn.

    Also, check that your inner cable slides freely in the outer - sticky
    cables are a common source of bad shifting.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; 'I think we should trust our president in every decision
    ;; that he makes and we should just support that'
    ;; Britney Spears of George W Bush, CNN 04:09:03
     
  3. soup

    soup Guest

    Simon Brooke popped their head over the parapet saw what was going on
    and said

    > You can take a deraileur off a chain without splitting it by removing
    > the two little bolts which are the axles for the jockey wheels (the
    > cage will come apart). While it's apart grease the bushes - the little
    > metal sleeves the bolts go through on which the wheels actually turn.


    Hadn't wanted to do that, as I had visions of little springs and
    washers flyimg everywhere as it was the operation was a fairly
    pain free swapped the "Derailleurs" last night in the rain etc.
    (wasn't 'allowed' to do it inside as SWMBO would complain)
    but today I shall cable-up and adjust for best working.
    --
    yours S

    Nihil curo de ista tua stulta superstitione
     
  4. Hywel Davies

    Hywel Davies Guest


    >
    > You can take a deraileur off a chain without splitting it by removing
    > the two little bolts which are the axles for the jockey wheels (the
    > cage will come apart). While it's apart grease the bushes - the little
    > metal sleeves the bolts go through on which the wheels actually turn.
    >

    But don't lose any of the small parts when it all goes "ping" - especially
    whilst reassembling, and then have to bore a out a 5mm hole in a bit of 7mm
    steel bar to replace the lost bit. Of course, I'd never be that careless
    myself......


    Hywel
     
  5. soup

    soup Guest

    Hywel Davies popped their head over the parapet saw what was going on
    and said
    > > You can take a deraileur off a chain without splitting it by
    > > removing the two little bolts which are the axles for the jockey
    > > wheels (the cage will come apart). While it's apart grease the
    > > bushes - the little metal sleeves the bolts go through on which the
    > > wheels actually turn.
    > >

    > But don't lose any of the small parts when it all goes "ping" -
    > especially whilst reassembling, and then have to bore a out a 5mm
    > hole in a bit of 7mm steel bar to replace the lost bit. Of course,
    > I'd never be that careless myself......
    >
    >
    > Hywel


    Must admit I thought there would be lots of springs and little
    unidentifiable bits flying everywhere but this didn't happen
    (to me) maybe because it was a cheap "Derailleur" but there
    was a minimum of loose parts.

    --
    yours S

    Nihil curo de ista tua stulta superstitione
     
  6. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    soup wrote:
    > Must admit I thought there would be lots of springs and little
    > unidentifiable bits flying everywhere but this didn't happen
    > (to me) maybe because it was a cheap "Derailleur" but there
    > was a minimum of loose parts.


    No there aren't too many loose parts in most derailleurs, but still don't
    take your bike apart on the garden lawn :)

    ~PB
     
  7. Simon Brooke wrote:

    > You can take a deraileur off a chain without splitting it by removing
    > the two little bolts which are the axles for the jockey wheels (the
    > cage will come apart).


    Which again leads me to ponder why no other manufacturer has yet copied Sun
    Tour's "Quick Cage" feature which allowed the chain to be removed without
    having to do /anything/ with the derailleur...

    --

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  8. AndyMorris

    AndyMorris Guest

    Dave Larrington wrote:
    > Simon Brooke wrote:
    >
    >> You can take a deraileur off a chain without splitting it by removing
    >> the two little bolts which are the axles for the jockey wheels (the
    >> cage will come apart).

    >
    > Which again leads me to ponder why no other manufacturer has yet
    > copied Sun Tour's "Quick Cage" feature which allowed the chain to be
    > removed without having to do /anything/ with the derailleur...



    They were nice weren't they?

    It may of been patented, also it made the cage less resistant to bending and
    twisting.



    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK


    Love this:
    Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
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