DeRosa bicycle warranty?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jim Cramer, Jun 24, 2003.

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  1. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Mark McMaster" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Another carbon for that that isn't bladder molded is WoundUp, whose round fork blades are
    > filament wound:
    >
    > http://www.advancedcomposites.com/woundup.htm

    FWIW, weaving filaments on a mandrel is a much more precise and controlled process than laying them
    up in a female mold, like a boat hull -- whether or not you're using bladders, vacuum bags, pre-preg
    materials, or autoclaves.

    That said, good bike frames and forks can be made either way.

    Matt O.
     


  2. Ajames54

    Ajames54 Guest

    On Thu, 26 Jun 2003 18:11:42 GMT, "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Mark McMaster" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >> Another carbon for that that isn't bladder molded is WoundUp, whose round fork blades are
    >> filament wound:
    >>
    >> http://www.advancedcomposites.com/woundup.htm
    >
    >FWIW, weaving filaments on a mandrel is a much more precise and controlled process than laying them
    >up in a female mold, like a boat hull -- whether or not you're using bladders, vacuum bags,
    >pre-preg materials, or autoclaves.
    >
    >That said, good bike frames and forks can be made either way.
    >
    >Matt O.
    >

    if you replace "is" with "can be" I'll agree 100%

    it gets to be like arguing tig/fillet/lugs however...each has it's own unique benefits and
    drawbacks.
     
  3. I would suppose the average rider only keeps a bike for a couple of years then it's sold secondhand
    or hung up in the garage & the warranty is never used. A few reasons they changed. ( Also add she to
    below) He want another colour He want another material Lance doesn't ride that one anymore Marco
    doesn't ride that one anymore He wants a lighter frame as he gets heavier. etc. etc. etc.

    Lifetime warranties are gimmicky & always put me on my guard, 2-5 years would be far more
    intelligent. Imagine a motorbike or car coming with a lifetime guarantee:) I remember a cycling
    friend taking his BMW motorbike in for its first Free service , the salesguy had a good laugh. Not
    pointing any fingers at any particular brands but I doubt you would have any luck getting a frame
    fixed back in Italy. The majority buy the hype & the pro team sponsorships without looking for the
    made in Italy decal.

    Steven L. Sheffield wrote:
    > On 6/24/03 10:16 AM, in article [email protected], "Jim Cramer"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Hi,
    >>
    >>I have a DeRosa Aluminum (Altec), model "Planet", road bike that is less than 4 years and just
    >>developed a crack 2/3 of the way around the right rear chainstay just ahead of the dropout.
    >>
    >>My local bike shop manager contacted some US DeRosa Rep who supposedly handles warranty issues and
    >>was shocked to be told that DeRosa have only a 2-year warranty.
    >>
    >>The DeRosa web site does not seem to have warranty info on it.
    >>
    >>Does anyone know for sure what their warranty is? If you do, could you mail me the info.
    >
    >
    >
    > I'm surprised that DeRosa offers even a 2-year warranty on one of their aluminium frames ... Most
    > of the Italian brands only offer 1-year on the aluminium stuff ...
    >
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, ""ideal\"@NOSPAM says...
    >
    >
    >I would suppose the average rider only keeps a bike for a couple of years then it's sold secondhand
    >or hung up in the garage & the warranty is never used. A few reasons they changed. ( Also add she
    >to below) He want another colour He want another material Lance doesn't ride that one anymore Marco
    >doesn't ride that one anymore He wants a lighter frame as he gets heavier. etc. etc. etc.
    >
    >Lifetime warranties are gimmicky & always put me on my guard, 2-5 years would be far more
    >intelligent.

    It sounds you are describing yourself above. I would be on guard for a bike with a short warranty
    simply because it tells me that either the manufacturer is expecting their frame to fail or they
    don't want to deal with a customer after they have your money.

    >Imagine a motorbike or car coming with a lifetime guarantee:)

    Apples and oranges. Bicycle companies only give lifetime warranties on frame and fork, nothing else.
    I'm sure that car companies could give lifetime warranties on frames.

    >I remember a cycling friend taking his BMW motorbike in for its first Free service , the salesguy
    >had a good laugh. Not pointing any fingers at any particular brands but I doubt you would have any
    >luck getting a frame fixed back in Italy. The majority buy the hype & the pro team sponsorships
    >without looking for the made in Italy decal.

    Made in italy carries quite a price premium. So much so that you can get a custom made in the USA
    bike for the same, or less. I'd go custom any day.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>, kolo <""ideal\"@NOSPAM> wrote:
    >I would suppose the average rider only keeps a bike for a couple of years then it's sold secondhand
    >or hung up in the garage & the warranty is never used. A few reasons they changed. ( Also add she
    >to below) He want another colour He want another material Lance doesn't ride that one anymore Marco
    >doesn't ride that one anymore He wants a lighter frame as he gets heavier. etc. etc. etc.

    And the #1 reason -

    He can get almost as much as he paid for it, from some dope on eBay, as long as it's Italian and the
    paint's in good shape.

    >Lifetime warranties are gimmicky & always put me on my guard, 2-5 years would be far more
    >intelligent. Imagine a motorbike or car coming with a lifetime guarantee:)

    No, imagine the FRAME of the car having a lifetime guarantee. It's a part that should last forever
    unless it fails due to rust or impact. If you buy sportscar (for street use) should it be OK for the
    frame to break in a few years, without you crashing it?

    --Paul
     
  6. On Fri, 27 Jun 2003 20:12:14 +0800, kolo <""ideal\"@NOSPAM>iinet.net.au> wrote:

    >Lifetime warranties are gimmicky & always put me on my guard, 2-5 years would be far more
    >intelligent. Imagine a motorbike or car coming with a lifetime guarantee:) I remember a cycling
    >friend taking his BMW motorbike in for its first Free service , the salesguy had a good laugh.

    Cars usually do, in fact, come with a free service after the first x miles. If bought new, that is.

    Jasper
     
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