Dia-Compe 287V brake levers

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Zog The Undeniable, Jan 22, 2005.

  1. Do the little pair of noodles (the ones without the adjusters) go
    between the lever body and the cable? Are they necessary?

    Dia-Compe don't supply any instructions, so I'm confused!
     
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  2. They allow you to route the cables so that they are not under the tape.
    They are placed between the lever body and the cable.
    Not necessary at all, but do use a ferrule if you don't use the noodles.

    Gary Jacobson
    Rosendale, NY



    "Zog The Undeniable" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Do the little pair of noodles (the ones without the adjusters) go
    > between the lever body and the cable? Are they necessary?
    >
    > Dia-Compe don't supply any instructions, so I'm confused!
     
  3. Zog The Undeniable wrote:
    > Do the little pair of noodles (the ones without the adjusters) go
    > between the lever body and the cable? Are they necessary?
    >
    > Dia-Compe don't supply any instructions, so I'm confused!


    So you've got two pairs of noodles- one with adjusters, one without. As
    far as I can recall with mine, the short noodle with the 45-degree bend
    does fit in the back of the lever between the cable housing and the
    body. I'm not certain, though- it's all buried underneath the tape and
    stuff right now.

    Jeff
     
  4. Gary Jacobson wrote:

    > They allow you to route the cables so that they are not under the tape.
    > They are placed between the lever body and the cable.
    > Not necessary at all, but do use a ferrule if you don't use the noodles.


    Thanks - I've tried it with just a ferrule, but the friction is so high
    that the brake won't release. On closer inspection the noodles are
    required because the "V" modification involves drilling a new hole for
    the cable which isn't countersunk to receive a cable end, unlike the
    normal 287 lever (the "normal" hole is blanked on the 287V.

    Unfortunately I've damaged one of mine in trying to fit it and this
    particular type of noodle doesn't seem to be available as a spare.
    Currently using V's with the old RSX levers, then...
     
  5. "Zog The Undeniable" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thanks - I've tried it with just a ferrule, but the friction is so high
    > that the brake won't release. On closer inspection the noodles are
    > required because the "V" modification involves drilling a new hole for
    > the cable which isn't countersunk to receive a cable end, unlike the
    > normal 287 lever (the "normal" hole is blanked on the 287V.


    This may not be helpful, but I can't picture what you're doing wrong. I've
    set up two pairs of these levers without noodles or ferrules, with the
    flush-cut cable housing running hard up against the lever body. I've had no
    friction problems - in fact the action of the levers in combination with XT
    V-brakes is impressively free and light.

    You could try boring out the hole to take a normal ferrule if you think
    that might help.

    James Thomson
     
  6. James Thomson wrote:

    > This may not be helpful, but I can't picture what you're doing wrong. I've
    > set up two pairs of these levers without noodles or ferrules, with the
    > flush-cut cable housing running hard up against the lever body. I've had no
    > friction problems - in fact the action of the levers in combination with XT
    > V-brakes is impressively free and light.
    >
    > You could try boring out the hole to take a normal ferrule if you think
    > that might help.


    I've tried it with and without ferrules now. An undamaged noodle works
    best, but friction is still quite high. If the old RSX levers don't
    work well on the road (the brakes are very squashy but very powerful)
    then I might try Travel Agents, or even mini-V's.
     
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