Diabetes and Stroke

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Ann, Feb 7, 2004.

  1. Ann

    Ann Guest

    Hello,

    A year ago I wrote to learn about type #1 diabetes because my then 19 year old daughter had just
    been diagnosed. She accepted her diagnosis and learned fast, she is very strict in her diet, runs
    five to seven miles a day (she was always a runner)sees her endocrinologist, dentist, and G.P.
    regularly.

    The problem is last week she had a stroke, she does not have high blood pressure, she is about 110
    lbs., and as I said she is very careful with her diet.

    They kept her in the hospital because of the weakness in her left side but so far the CAT scan was
    normal as was the MRI. We are waiting for the Echocardiagram results. The only lasting effect is her
    left upper lip droops a bit.

    A few months before she was diagnosed she and my other daughter were in a car accident, she had two
    complaints for months after, a very bad pain in her upper stomach area, under her left breast and a
    pain that ran down her left arm. (There was no reflex in this arm for months)The pain in the upper
    stomach went away once diagnosed with diabetes and started on insulin but the left arm still hurt.

    Since the stroke she gets sharp pains that run down her arm to her fingers. While we wait for
    results and more doctor appointments I was hoping someone might find some of this familiar and
    point me in the right direction. As I said she has accepted her diabetes and the changes that
    brought to her life but this is scaring her, she is so afraid she will have another stroke and it
    will be worse.

    I would appreciate any help and advice, Ann
     
    Tags:


  2. Mike Moffat

    Mike Moffat Guest

    Hi Ann, First off I`ll say I am sorry to here about your daughters stroke. Although stroke is a
    complication related to diabetes. Diabetes is not always the culprit behind the stroke. With her
    young age and good care and control as you explain it, there could be another cause totally
    unrelated. Diabetes often gets the blame for these things when it is not always the case. You did
    not mention if there is a family history of strokes, or heart disease. Are there any other under
    lying conditions. You did not mention has a cardiologist, or a nuerologist been consulted. That
    could be helpful. You could also get some info our support from your local Heart and Stroke
    foundation or it`s American equivalent. Hope all works out well for your daughter Mike in Canada
     
  3. Hello Ann,

    Sorry to hear about your daughter's complications.

    Although your daughter's diagnosis a year or so ago, she might have been for longer than that.

    That's my case. I was diagnosed T2 in May of 2003 but the current level of damage to my body shows
    longer than that. It just so happened that my glucose and other factors weren't as high when I had
    my regular checkups every 6 month.

    I now suffer from diabetic neuropathy (Link follows), a family of nerve disorders caused by
    diabetes. Causes plenty of different symptoms and pains that are actually false.

    http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/neuropathies/

    There are nerve response test that can be performed to diagnose this.

    Although this is not good news either, it could explain your daughter's symptoms. And IMHO far
    better than not knowing what's happening to your body.

    So many times did I end up in hospitals for chest pains, accompanied by left arm numbness or pain at
    left shoulder or on inside of elbow. All those times was first treated as cardiac patient (I also
    have other health problems that led doctors in the wrong direction) to finally be put on observation
    because blood work and ECG was not showing the same symptoms.

    Hoping she can resolve this soon with her current specialists.

    Dan from Canada

    T2, Dx May 2003 Meds: Metformin 850mg 3/day Glyburide 2.5mg 2/day Regular exercise, Strict Diet

    [email protected] (Ann) wrote in news:bd3bf078.0402072051.47005238 @posting.google.com:

    > Hello,
    >
    > A year ago I wrote to learn about type #1 diabetes because my then 19 year old daughter had just
    > been diagnosed. She accepted her diagnosis and learned fast, she is very strict in her diet, runs
    > five to seven miles a day (she was always a runner)sees her endocrinologist, dentist, and G.P.
    > regularly.
    >
    > ...
     
  4. Julie Bove

    Julie Bove Guest

    "Ann" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello,
    >
    > A year ago I wrote to learn about type #1 diabetes because my then 19 year old daughter had just
    > been diagnosed. She accepted her diagnosis and learned fast, she is very strict in her diet, runs
    > five to seven miles a day (she was always a runner)sees her endocrinologist, dentist, and G.P.
    > regularly.
    >
    > The problem is last week she had a stroke, she does not have high blood pressure, she is about 110
    > lbs., and as I said she is very careful with her diet.
    >
    > They kept her in the hospital because of the weakness in her left side but so far the CAT scan was
    > normal as was the MRI. We are waiting for the Echocardiagram results. The only lasting effect is
    > her left upper lip droops a bit.
    >
    > A few months before she was diagnosed she and my other daughter were in a car accident, she had
    > two complaints for months after, a very bad pain in her upper stomach area, under her left breast
    > and a pain that ran down her left arm. (There was no reflex in this arm for months)The pain in
    > the upper stomach went away once diagnosed with diabetes and started on insulin but the left arm
    > still hurt.
    >
    > Since the stroke she gets sharp pains that run down her arm to her fingers. While we wait for
    > results and more doctor appointments I was hoping someone might find some of this familiar and
    > point me in the right direction. As I said she has accepted her diabetes and the changes that
    > brought to her life but this is scaring her, she is so afraid she will have another stroke and it
    > will be worse.
    >
    > I would appreciate any help and advice,

    Strokes can come about for many reasons. It might not be related to the diabetes at all. Sounds like
    she needs to be seeing a heart specialist.

    --
    Type 2 http://users.bestweb.net/~jbove/
     
  5. Ann, My heart goes out to you, your daughter and your family. What an awful and scary thing
    to happen!

    As some others have pointed out, the cause may not be diabetes. Is your daughter on any sort of
    birth control pills? I have a good friend who had a stroke at 18. It was caused by her birth
    control pills.

    Also, it sounds like some things are going on due to the accident she and her sister were in. I hope
    that her doctors take her accident into consideration while they look into this situation.

    It sounds like your daughter is doing everything (and more) that she is supposed to do. I truly hope
    that ya'll are able to discern what is going on here. Steph

    "Ann" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello,
    >
    > A year ago I wrote to learn about type #1 diabetes because my then 19 year old daughter had just
    > been diagnosed. She accepted her diagnosis and learned fast, she is very strict in her diet, runs
    > five to seven miles a day (she was always a runner)sees her endocrinologist, dentist, and G.P.
    > regularly.
    >
    > The problem is last week she had a stroke, she does not have high blood pressure, she is about 110
    > lbs., and as I said she is very careful with her diet.
    >
    > They kept her in the hospital because of the weakness in her left side but so far the CAT scan was
    > normal as was the MRI. We are waiting for the Echocardiagram results. The only lasting effect is
    > her left upper lip droops a bit.
    >
    > A few months before she was diagnosed she and my other daughter were in a car accident, she had
    > two complaints for months after, a very bad pain in her upper stomach area, under her left breast
    > and a pain that ran down her left arm. (There was no reflex in this arm for months)The pain in
    > the upper stomach went away once diagnosed with diabetes and started on insulin but the left arm
    > still hurt.
    >
    > Since the stroke she gets sharp pains that run down her arm to her fingers. While we wait for
    > results and more doctor appointments I was hoping someone might find some of this familiar and
    > point me in the right direction. As I said she has accepted her diabetes and the changes that
    > brought to her life but this is scaring her, she is so afraid she will have another stroke and it
    > will be worse.
    >
    > I would appreciate any help and advice, Ann
     
  6. Joe Durusau

    Joe Durusau Guest

    One possibility that I don't see mentioned earlier is that strokes can be provoked by a serious
    low. Since your daughter is highly physically active, it is possible that she may provoke a low,
    particularly since she is still relatively new to diabetes. Of course, I am not qualified to
    give you (or your daughter) medical advice, but she might discuss this possibility with her
    medical advisors.

    Speaking only for myself,

    Joe Durusau

    Ann wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > A year ago I wrote to learn about type #1 diabetes because my then 19 year old daughter had just
    > been diagnosed. She accepted her diagnosis and learned fast, she is very strict in her diet, runs
    > five to seven miles a day (she was always a runner)sees her endocrinologist, dentist, and G.P.
    > regularly.
    >
    > The problem is last week she had a stroke, she does not have high blood pressure, she is about 110
    > lbs., and as I said she is very careful with her diet.
    >
    > They kept her in the hospital because of the weakness in her left side but so far the CAT scan was
    > normal as was the MRI. We are waiting for the Echocardiagram results. The only lasting effect is
    > her left upper lip droops a bit.
    >
    > A few months before she was diagnosed she and my other daughter were in a car accident, she had
    > two complaints for months after, a very bad pain in her upper stomach area, under her left breast
    > and a pain that ran down her left arm. (There was no reflex in this arm for months)The pain in
    > the upper stomach went away once diagnosed with diabetes and started on insulin but the left arm
    > still hurt.
    >
    > Since the stroke she gets sharp pains that run down her arm to her fingers. While we wait for
    > results and more doctor appointments I was hoping someone might find some of this familiar and
    > point me in the right direction. As I said she has accepted her diabetes and the changes that
    > brought to her life but this is scaring her, she is so afraid she will have another stroke and it
    > will be worse.
    >
    > I would appreciate any help and advice, Ann
     
  7. Evon

    Evon Guest

    Have you considered a pinched nerve? A friend of mine developed left foot
    drop and neuropathies in both feet and lower legs. He had nerve conduction
    test done which were normal. He was told that it was a result of his
    diabetes. When it got to the point that walking was difficult his family doc
    referred him to a Osteopath. After about 3 weeks, he started walking to push
    a lawn mower. Then the doc was killed in a auto accident and his case
    regressed. He then went to a Chiropractor now 6 months later, he plays low
    level basket ball at the "Y", has shoveled snow this winter. He did 6 weeks
    Chiropractic treatment and the doc told him to only come back when he
    noticed a return of symptoms. I think he's been back twice in 4 months. He
    also started Pilate's exercises which he says helps. So, if you daughter's
    nerve conduction test are negative maybe you need to try something out of
    the box. My friend says give a Osteopath or a Chiropractor 8 - 10 visits. If
    you don't see a change then change docs or quit! FWIW
    "Ann" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello,
    >
    > A year ago I wrote to learn about type #1 diabetes because my then 19 year old daughter had just
    > been diagnosed. She accepted her diagnosis and learned fast, she is very strict in her diet, runs
    > five to seven miles a day (she was always a runner)sees her endocrinologist, dentist, and G.P.
    > regularly.
    >
    > The problem is last week she had a stroke, she does not have high blood pressure, she is about 110
    > lbs., and as I said she is very careful with her diet.
    >
    > They kept her in the hospital because of the weakness in her left side but so far the CAT scan was
    > normal as was the MRI. We are waiting for the Echocardiagram results. The only lasting effect is
    > her left upper lip droops a bit.
    >
    > A few months before she was diagnosed she and my other daughter were in a car accident, she had
    > two complaints for months after, a very bad pain in her upper stomach area, under her left breast
    > and a pain that ran down her left arm. (There was no reflex in this arm for months)The pain in
    > the upper stomach went away once diagnosed with diabetes and started on insulin but the left arm
    > still hurt.
    >
    > Since the stroke she gets sharp pains that run down her arm to her fingers. While we wait for
    > results and more doctor appointments I was hoping someone might find some of this familiar and
    > point me in the right direction. As I said she has accepted her diabetes and the changes that
    > brought to her life but this is scaring her, she is so afraid she will have another stroke and it
    > will be worse.
    >
    > I would appreciate any help and advice, Ann
     
  8. Ann

    Ann Guest

    "Mike Moffat" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > You did not mention if there is a family history of strokes, or heart disease. Are there any other
    > under lying conditions. You did not mention has a cardiologist, or a nuerologist been consulted.
    > That could be helpful.

    Hi Mike, There is no history of stroke in our family nor heart disease. They did call a neurologist
    in to the hospital who ordered a CAT scan which was negative and an MRI which has also come back
    negative. She did just have an echocardiagram and we are waiting for those results. That test
    however was done by our primary so I will take your advice and call a cardiologist, Thank you.
     
  9. Ann

    Ann Guest

  10. Joe, Serious lows can provoke a stroke? I've never heard this. (I'm not being flippant, I am really
    asking the question.) Steph

    "Joe Durusau" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > One possibility that I don't see mentioned earlier is that strokes can be provoked by a serious
    > low. Since your daughter is highly physically active, it is possible that she may provoke a low,
    > particularly since she is still relatively new to diabetes. Of course, I am not qualified to give
    > you (or your daughter) medical advice, but she might discuss this possibility with her medical
    > advisors.
    >
    > Speaking only for myself,
    >
    > Joe Durusau
    >
    >
    >
    > Ann wrote:
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > A year ago I wrote to learn about type #1 diabetes because my then 19 year old daughter had just
    > > been diagnosed. She accepted her diagnosis and learned fast, she is very strict in her diet,
    > > runs five to seven miles a day (she was always a runner)sees her endocrinologist, dentist, and
    > > G.P. regularly.
    > >
    > > The problem is last week she had a stroke, she does not have high blood pressure, she is about
    > > 110 lbs., and as I said she is very careful with her diet.
    > >
    > > They kept her in the hospital because of the weakness in her left side but so far the CAT scan
    > > was normal as was the MRI. We are waiting for the Echocardiagram results. The only lasting
    > > effect is her left upper lip droops a bit.
    > >
    > > A few months before she was diagnosed she and my other daughter were in a car accident, she had
    > > two complaints for months after, a very bad pain in her upper stomach area, under her left
    > > breast and a pain that ran down her left arm. (There was no reflex in this arm for months)The
    > > pain in the upper stomach went away once diagnosed with diabetes and started on insulin but the
    > > left arm still hurt.
    > >
    > > Since the stroke she gets sharp pains that run down her arm to her fingers. While we wait for
    > > results and more doctor appointments I was hoping someone might find some of this familiar and
    > > point me in the right direction. As I said she has accepted her diabetes and the changes that
    > > brought to her life but this is scaring her, she is so afraid she will have another stroke and
    > > it will be worse.
    > >
    > > I would appreciate any help and advice, Ann
     
  11. Joe Durusau

    Joe Durusau Guest

    I'm afraid it can happen. My Father died as a result of one such. It's one of the reasons that
    hospitals are paranoid about lows, but don't worry much about highs. I must observe that it was a
    long time ago, and my Father was proabably on a sulf at the time, which may or may not have made a
    difference.

    Speaking only for myself,

    Joe Durusau

    Stephanie Kolban wrote:
    > Joe, Serious lows can provoke a stroke? I've never heard this. (I'm not being flippant, I am
    > really asking the question.) Steph
    >
    >
    > "Joe Durusau" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>One possibility that I don't see mentioned earlier is that strokes can be provoked by a serious
    >>low. Since your daughter is highly physically active, it is possible that she may provoke a low,
    >>particularly since she is still relatively new to diabetes. Of course, I am not qualified to give
    >>you (or your daughter) medical advice, but she might discuss this possibility with her medical
    >>advisors.
    >>
    >>Speaking only for myself,
    >>
    >>Joe Durusau
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>Ann wrote:
    >>
    >>>Hello,
    >>>
    >>>A year ago I wrote to learn about type #1 diabetes because my then 19 year old daughter had just
    >>>been diagnosed. She accepted her diagnosis and learned fast, she is very strict in her diet, runs
    >>>five to seven miles a day (she was always a runner)sees her endocrinologist, dentist, and G.P.
    >>>regularly.
    >>>
    >>>The problem is last week she had a stroke, she does not have high blood pressure, she is about
    >>>110 lbs., and as I said she is very careful with her diet.
    >>>
    >>>They kept her in the hospital because of the weakness in her left side but so far the CAT scan
    >>>was normal as was the MRI. We are waiting for the Echocardiagram results. The only lasting effect
    >>>is her left upper lip droops a bit.
    >>>
    >>>A few months before she was diagnosed she and my other daughter were in a car accident, she had
    >>>two complaints for months after, a very bad pain in her upper stomach area, under her left breast
    >>>and a pain that ran down her left arm. (There was no reflex in this arm for months)The pain in
    >>>the upper stomach went away once diagnosed with diabetes and started on insulin but the left arm
    >>>still hurt.
    >>>
    >>>Since the stroke she gets sharp pains that run down her arm to her fingers. While we wait for
    >>>results and more doctor appointments I was hoping someone might find some of this familiar and
    >>>point me in the right direction. As I said she has accepted her diabetes and the changes that
    >>>brought to her life but this is scaring her, she is so afraid she will have another stroke and it
    >>>will be worse.
    >>>
    >>>I would appreciate any help and advice, Ann
    >>
     
  12. Wow. Sorry about your father. Thanks for the information. Steph

    "Joe Durusau" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm afraid it can happen. My Father died as a result of one such. It's one of the reasons that
    > hospitals are paranoid about lows, but don't worry much about highs. I must observe that it was a
    > long time ago, and my Father was proabably on a sulf at the time, which may or may not have made a
    > difference.
    >
    > Speaking only for myself,
    >
    > Joe Durusau
    >
    >
    > Stephanie Kolban wrote:
    > > Joe, Serious lows can provoke a stroke? I've never heard this. (I'm not
    being
    > > flippant, I am really asking the question.) Steph
    > >
    > >
    > > "Joe Durusau" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > >>One possibility that I don't see mentioned earlier is that strokes can be provoked by a serious
    > >>low. Since your daughter is highly physically active, it is possible that she may provoke a low,
    > >>particularly since she is still relatively new to diabetes. Of course, I am not qualified to
    > >>give you (or your daughter) medical advice, but she might discuss this possibility with her
    > >>medical advisors.
    > >>
    > >>Speaking only for myself,
    > >>
    > >>Joe Durusau
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>Ann wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>Hello,
    > >>>
    > >>>A year ago I wrote to learn about type #1 diabetes because my then 19 year old daughter had
    > >>>just been diagnosed. She accepted her diagnosis and learned fast, she is very strict in her
    > >>>diet, runs five to seven miles a day (she was always a runner)sees her endocrinologist,
    > >>>dentist, and G.P. regularly.
    > >>>
    > >>>The problem is last week she had a stroke, she does not have high blood pressure, she is about
    > >>>110 lbs., and as I said she is very careful with her diet.
    > >>>
    > >>>They kept her in the hospital because of the weakness in her left side but so far the CAT scan
    > >>>was normal as was the MRI. We are waiting for the Echocardiagram results. The only lasting
    > >>>effect is her left upper lip droops a bit.
    > >>>
    > >>>A few months before she was diagnosed she and my other daughter were in a car accident, she had
    > >>>two complaints for months after, a very bad pain in her upper stomach area, under her left
    > >>>breast and a pain that ran down her left arm. (There was no reflex in this arm for months)The
    > >>>pain in the upper stomach went away once diagnosed with diabetes and started on insulin but the
    > >>>left arm still hurt.
    > >>>
    > >>>Since the stroke she gets sharp pains that run down her arm to her fingers. While we wait for
    > >>>results and more doctor appointments I was hoping someone might find some of this familiar and
    > >>>point me in the right direction. As I said she has accepted her diabetes and the changes that
    > >>>brought to her life but this is scaring her, she is so afraid she will have another stroke and
    > >>>it will be worse.
    > >>>
    > >>>I would appreciate any help and advice, Ann
    > >>
    > >
     
  13. Bl 1204

    Bl 1204 Guest

    I like Evon's post the best. There are no coincidences. It is probably rare, but it may well be that
    the accident, the diabetes, and the stroke are related. If so, there may be a structural glitch that
    can be helped by an osteopath or a chiropractor, and I mean an excellent one. Or maybe not. Find the
    best one you can by word of mouth and give it a go. Give it a go and pray a lot. Give it a chance
    but don't be taken in either. Massage therapy of the right sort could be helpful too. Good luck.

    BL

    "As the waves pass the rock, their shape is changed. There is a hologram of the rock within the wave
    that comes forward and crashes on the beach, then there's a reflected wave back." Ralph Abraham

    "I'd like to learn to windsurf." BL
     
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