Did I get the wrong frame and fork?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Hazmat, Feb 2, 2005.

  1. Hazmat

    Hazmat New Member

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    I did some searching but didn't seem to find exactly the answer I need. I have a road frame from Nashbar (yes, I know, it sucks) and a 1" threadless Kestrel fork. Me mum got me some parts for my birfday but the stem is the wrong size (Truvativ TEAM OS....damn that thing is pretty) I have been told by one very reputable bike shop here in Austin (university cyclery, for those that know) that shimming is OK and there is nothing to worry about. Another equally reputable shop (Bicycle Sport shop) said that under no circumstances would they recommend shimming for bars or stem. I asked the latter if I just weld a shim onto the steerer, would it be ok, because he had not seen it done, he declined to comment but reiterated that it is policy to specifically recommend against it. Key point here, the folks saying not to do even began to try to sell me anything and we talked for a while about it.

    The fact that there was no hard or soft sell, just a straight recommendation suggests that there may be something to it.

    My dilema is this. I need to get a stem, but I have been told because it is threadless I cannot use a quill type and all of my searching for a good looking (yes, I am allowing aethetics to come into play in my decision) and well built stem has turned up zilch in the way of a high end (high end for this purpose equals about $50-$80 internet prices) except for easton, and quite frankly they look anemic at best.

    1) Does truvative or FSA actually make a stem for a 1" steerer (I am willing to swap my 26mm Modolo bars for almost any 31.8, thats not a big deal)? If so, can you rpovide a link, cause this google god is being shut down in every search.

    2) Is a 1" steerer old tech for a reason? Is it more prone to stress cracking or failure (I'm a big boy, 6'5" or so, 270#). My talks with Kestrel seemed to reassure me the fork can totally take it (with the obvious exception of some crash event or massive undue stress). Should I have gotten something with a 1 1/8" (doesn't really matter cause I can no longer return the fork or frame)?

    3) Can I safely use a shim or the steerer or bars? Should I weld the shim on?

    4) Is a 6degree rise going to be what I need.

    5) lastly, if i am stuck with the 1" steerer, what is the best way to go (pls provide link if possible or at least tell me where to find it, ie, perf bike, nashbar, other) for a stem?


    I am sorry if this a bunch of n00bie crap that ppl are sick of hearing, I know it gets old on the automotive sites I'm on, but I did try to search and did a lot of reading but qwasn't finding situations/questions similar enough as to be relavent.

    Thank you in advance for any advice you can offer.
     
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  2. eric_the_red

    eric_the_red New Member

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    I don't see the problem with a shim, my Ritchey stem actually came with a shim to fit my 1" steerer. I definitely wouldn't weld it on though. Seems that most stems are made for larger steerers now, probably so they don't have to make 2 sizes.

    As for the 6 degree rise that would depend on your riding style and body.

    And sorry the turbo can't go on the bike, it has to go in your legs :)
     
  3. Fat Hack

    Fat Hack New Member

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    Nothing wrong with shimming a stem to go on a 1" steerer -- I do it. Some stems even come with shims specifically for this purpose.

    I'd be much less comfortable shimming handle bars, and it's just not necessary because there are plently of different diameter bars around. Quite a bit of force goes into the bars when to have weight on the brake hoods.

    From my observations, 26.0mm is the most common these days.
     
  4. davidbod

    davidbod New Member

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    I think shimming is fine too. Don't weld it, because the heat will stress the alluminium stem or stearer, whichever you were planning to weld to. To get a reasonable idea of how high your bar should be you first need to figure out your saddle height. Once you have that your bar height should be in the range of even with the saddle to a few inches lower depending on how aero you want to go and how flexible your back is. With your size your going to want to stick to a higher bar position first. The key here is not to cut the stearer tube too small. Cut it so you have plenty of room to play around with your bar height. The spacers that you normaly see between the frame and stem can easily go on top of the stem also giving you room to play with and adjust your bar height until you dial it in. Yes it will look dorky with an inch or two of spacers sticking out of your stem, but if you cut it too short you can't get it back.

    For a quick and dirty setup go to www.wrenchscience.com and look for their fitting guide.

    Have fun.
     
  5. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    1 1/8" is becoming the standard because it's marginally stiffer/ligher than 1". Most of us wouldn't be able to feel the difference though. Any difference in strength is much more dependant on the quality of the materials and manufacturing than the size.
    Shimming between the stem and steerer isn't a problem because there's not too much shear there. Like Fat Hack said, you probably don't want to try shimming the bars. That clamp is holding onto a lot of torque, and it's something you really don't want to have slip when you're out of the saddle pounding up a hill.
     
  6. Hazmat

    Hazmat New Member

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    Thanks for the responses guys! I really like the forum, no n00bie bashing .... yet :D


    anyway, I'm going to keep the truvative stem and swap the bars for an OS piece. The guy I talked to at the sportshop today was very knowledgable and reinforced (sp?) that shiming is fine...makes me wonder about the first guy.

    Anyway, new question (I have more but I'll serach first)

    SO, i have a nashbar ergo handlebar, but it's a 26mm, so I need to get a 31.8, I see the ritchie pro OS on sale and think hey whay not, but I also see the nashbar OS for about half the price. I have no prob spending 60 instead of 25 if it is worth it, buuuut, is it worth it?

    I see the ritchie is 280g and the nash is 270g, both for a 44cm, other than weight, is there a significant diff in the quality of the aluminum? Is the MFR process closer spec on the ritchie than the nashbar?

    I know its not rocket surgery, but share your thoughts yes?
     
  7. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    They may both be made in the same sweat shop in the orient.
     
  8. Hazmat

    Hazmat New Member

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    yeah, i was afraid of that possibility. That is the name of the game in custom tuner parts (AEM BB kit=$519 Tenzo=$300....both cast in the same factory in Taiwan)

    anyone else?
     
  9. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    There aren't too many threadless 1" stems around. I have a 1" steerer (all carbon) on one of my bikes and Im a big guy too (220). Originally my bike came with an alloy steerer tube on the fork and I had a TTT Forgie stem with a single bolt clamp. It was ok with about 25mm of spacers. When I switched to the carbon steerer, I had to go with a two bolt clamp (Ritchey WCS) and fewer spacers (15 mm, which was fine since the stem had more of a rise and the 25 mm was too high). With the single bolt and 25mm of stack it was too flexy (that is the max reccomended stack for a 1" carbon steerer). As far as the front clamp, I have both a 26.00 and a 31.7mm on different bikes. I don't think it makes too much of a difference for stiffness (the 26.00 is plenty stiff for me) although some may say they prefer the 31.7. If a 26 mm is stiff enough for Lance, I'm sure it's stiff enough for any recreational cyclist or racer that's not a pro. Also, shimming the stem is fine and has never been an issue. My .02
    :cool:
     
  10. stang106

    stang106 New Member

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    Hazmat:

    Please let us know how you like the nashbar bike after you get it up and running. I have a hard time believing that a frame that costs ten times what yours does is ten times better. I looked at that frame but bought a Leader. It also has aero down and seat tubes, 'S' chain and seat stays, hidden head set, and the welds look fine. With the cash I saved I am putting on new Chorus everything and Eurus wheels. I think you are on the right track if on a limited budget. Give us an opinion when its done.
    Dave
     
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