Did Trek Buy Wound-Up?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by jerry in vermont, Dec 14, 2005.

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  2. psycholist

    psycholist Guest

    "BTW, this is perhaps the only trek bike that I have ever seen that I
    would consider buying."

    Why would you say that? Trek OCLV frames have been proven performers for
    over a decade and represent a pretty reasonable value -- especially when you
    consider the lifetime warranty that Trek stands behind quite well.

    When I read statements like these speaking out against Trek I have to figure
    they're being made by people who can't stand leaders just 'cuz they're
    leaders (are you French perhaps?). I also have to figure they're being made
    by folks who are just talking out of their asses 'cuz they have no direct
    knowledge or experience to speak from.

    I own or have owned in the recent past: Schwinn, Raleigh, K2, Cervelo,
    Cannondale and Trek. I'm a high-mileage rider ... 1,000 miles a month or
    better. I have to ride on some really rotten roads that beat the crap out
    of equipment. My Trek OCLV road bike and my Trek time trial bike are the
    two finest bikes I own and my Trek OCLV is also the one with the most
    mileage. I've been sucked into buying some other bikes because of hype
    about better ride quality or better this or that. None of them have been
    better. I always end up back on the Trek OCLV. It's light, fast, durable
    and reasonably priced.

    So what's your problem with it? You shouldn't take a pot-shot like that and
    not back it up with something.

    And yes, that certainly does look like a Wound Up fork.

    --
    Bob C.

    "Of course it hurts. The trick is not minding that it hurts."
    T. E. Lawrence (of Arabia)
    "jerry in vermont" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Is it just me, or is this "Bontreker" fork a copy of a Woundup carbon?
    >
    > Anybody on this inside know the scoop?
    >
    > BTW, this is perhaps the only trek bike that I have ever seen that I
    > would consider buying.
    >
    > J
    >
    > http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech.php?id=photos/2005/tech/features/trek_urban/trek_portland2
    >
    > imagine tinyurl here
    >
     
  3. I have been lusting over this bike for a while:
    http://groups.google.com/group/rec....35b?q=andrew_f_martin&rnum=8#3f59bf739063435b

    It's not yet available, but I hope to get one as soon as they ship
    (rumors of end of month). It's got lax geometry, so I won't be able to
    duplicate the feel of my Madone, but it looks right on otherwise.
    Kona, Schwinn, Redline, and Surly have tried similar models, but the
    Trek appears to be the Disc Road bike that finally puts it all
    together.

    -a
     
  4. Agreed. I've had a fleet of different OCLV bikes - each better than
    the last (Madone SL>5900>5500). Each has had a ride quality at least
    equal and in some cases exceeding the finest bikes I've ridden
    (Fondriest, De Rosa, Seven, Serotta, Colnago, etc). It's the "Damn
    Yankee's" syndrome - that said...I do hate the Yankees.
     

  5. >
    > So what's your problem with it? You shouldn't take a pot-shot like that and
    > not back it up with something.
    >
    > And yes, that certainly does look like a Wound Up fork.
    >
    > --
    > Bob C.
    >



    i didnt say it has anything to do with the performance. I said its the
    only one I have seen that i would consider buying.

    it has nothing to do with performance, in fact. it has to do with the
    fact that its a TREK. I raced on a Univega in high school. It was
    sweet, I thought, back then. I would not own a Univega now even if
    they did still make bikes that were equivalent to a TREK.

    Its a bike culture thing. I come from a time when treks (and univegas)
    were LAME. Colnago is cool. A nice Ciocc is cool. I loved my Basso
    and miss it. Cervelos speak to my formula 1 side. I would ride a BMC.
    I wouldn't own a TREK, except for that one.

    The reason is that to ME, they are still soul-less. And its totally an
    internal evaluation. Everybody has got one and TREKS were TREKS back
    when Huffy's were Huffy's so I dont like em. Pretty simple.

    The bike I noted is the first thing to roll outa waterloo that popped,
    that seemed to have any kind of character.

    Joy of ownership man. Thats what its all about. Bike passion, that is
    what its all about. If TREKS give you wood, ride 'em.

    J
    PhD in Bike Snobbery
     
  6. Andrew F Martin wrote:
    > I have been lusting over this bike for a while:
    > http://groups.google.com/group/rec....35b?q=andrew_f_martin&rnum=8#3f59bf739063435b
    >
    > It's not yet available, but I hope to get one as soon as they ship
    > (rumors of end of month). It's got lax geometry, so I won't be able to
    > duplicate the feel of my Madone, but it looks right on otherwise.
    > Kona, Schwinn, Redline, and Surly have tried similar models, but the
    > Trek appears to be the Disc Road bike that finally puts it all
    > together.
    >
    > -a


    Thats the model I was refering too. Its got enough of "it" that I
    would own it.

    J
     
  7. psycholist

    psycholist Guest

    Sounds to me more like a PHD in superficiality! ;-)

    Whatever floats your boat.

    I wouldn't exactly say that my Trek "gives me wood." I like it a lot,
    though.

    --
    Bob C.

    "Of course it hurts. The trick is not minding that it hurts."
    T. E. Lawrence (of Arabia)
    "jerry in vermont" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >>
    >> So what's your problem with it? You shouldn't take a pot-shot like that
    >> and
    >> not back it up with something.
    >>
    >> And yes, that certainly does look like a Wound Up fork.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Bob C.
    >>

    >
    >
    > i didnt say it has anything to do with the performance. I said its the
    > only one I have seen that i would consider buying.
    >
    > it has nothing to do with performance, in fact. it has to do with the
    > fact that its a TREK. I raced on a Univega in high school. It was
    > sweet, I thought, back then. I would not own a Univega now even if
    > they did still make bikes that were equivalent to a TREK.
    >
    > Its a bike culture thing. I come from a time when treks (and univegas)
    > were LAME. Colnago is cool. A nice Ciocc is cool. I loved my Basso
    > and miss it. Cervelos speak to my formula 1 side. I would ride a BMC.
    > I wouldn't own a TREK, except for that one.
    >
    > The reason is that to ME, they are still soul-less. And its totally an
    > internal evaluation. Everybody has got one and TREKS were TREKS back
    > when Huffy's were Huffy's so I dont like em. Pretty simple.
    >
    > The bike I noted is the first thing to roll outa waterloo that popped,
    > that seemed to have any kind of character.
    >
    > Joy of ownership man. Thats what its all about. Bike passion, that is
    > what its all about. If TREKS give you wood, ride 'em.
    >
    > J
    > PhD in Bike Snobbery
    >
     
  8. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    Hey Jerry, if you ride a 55 do I have the Basso for you!
     
  9. Tom Kunich wrote:
    > Hey Jerry, if you ride a 55 do I have the Basso for you!


    i wish i was that big. i am tyler-esque at a 52-53. Mine was a Basso
    Lotto in LA Lakers colors (they called it tequila sunrise, right) and
    had columbus MS tubing which was a rare, classy precursor to the MAX
    shaped tubing. It was shaped, but the joints were lugged! Very
    expensive lug set.

    I sold it to go aluminum and light. Got a soul-less bike and never
    road it cause it didnt speak to me.

    Its not about snobbery or superficiality. On the contrary (i wouldnt
    own a colnago), its about _cycling_ and zen and what it puts in your
    heart when you ride.

    J
    Happy Hour!
     
  10. Jay S. Hill

    Jay S. Hill Guest

    jerry in vermont wrote:
    > BTW, this is perhaps the only trek bike that I have ever seen that I
    > would consider buying.


    Those bars and shifters are uglier than a hungover Phyllis Diller.
     
  11. I have yet to buy a bike that I didn't replace the bar/stem on.
    Shifters look fine to me.
     
  12. "jerry in vermont" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > i wish i was that big. i am tyler-esque at a 52-53. Mine was a Basso
    > Lotto in LA Lakers colors (they called it tequila sunrise, right) and
    > had columbus MS tubing which was a rare, classy precursor to the MAX
    > shaped tubing. It was shaped, but the joints were lugged! Very
    > expensive lug set.
    >
    > I sold it to go aluminum and light. Got a soul-less bike and never
    > road it cause it didnt speak to me.
    >
    > Its not about snobbery or superficiality. On the contrary (i wouldnt
    > own a colnago), its about _cycling_ and zen and what it puts in your
    > heart when you ride.
    >


    One of my favorite bikes was the one I rode (and got to keep) from Team
    Lycra in 1988. It, too, was MS tubing but was lugles, built by Andrea
    Pesenti and badged as a (Steve) Bauer. The interesting thing is that
    different builders oriented the teardrop shaped downtube both ways: with the
    pointy edge of the tube down toward the ground, or pointing up toward the
    top tube.

    You're absolutely right about those frames having soul.
     
  13. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "psycholist" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Sounds to me more like a PHD in superficiality! ;-)
    >
    > Whatever floats your boat.
    >
    > I wouldn't exactly say that my Trek "gives me wood." I like it a lot,
    > though.


    Bob, it's all about personal preferences. Nothing more. I know that Treks are
    well made, well equipped, ride great and have a great warranty. But I don't want
    one. Personal preference. Pretty much the same as Jerry, probabbly.

    --
    tanx,
    Howard

    The poodle bites, the poodle chews it.

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  14. Carl Sundquist wrote:
    > "jerry in vermont" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >
    > > i wish i was that big. i am tyler-esque at a 52-53. Mine was a Basso
    > > Lotto in LA Lakers colors (they called it tequila sunrise, right) and
    > > had columbus MS tubing which was a rare, classy precursor to the MAX
    > > shaped tubing. It was shaped, but the joints were lugged! Very
    > > expensive lug set.
    > >
    > > I sold it to go aluminum and light. Got a soul-less bike and never
    > > road it cause it didnt speak to me.
    > >
    > > Its not about snobbery or superficiality. On the contrary (i wouldnt
    > > own a colnago), its about _cycling_ and zen and what it puts in your
    > > heart when you ride.
    > >

    >
    > One of my favorite bikes was the one I rode (and got to keep) from Team
    > Lycra in 1988. It, too, was MS tubing but was lugles, built by Andrea
    > Pesenti and badged as a (Steve) Bauer. The interesting thing is that
    > different builders oriented the teardrop shaped downtube both ways: with the
    > pointy edge of the tube down toward the ground, or pointing up toward the
    > top tube.
    >
    > You're absolutely right about those frames having soul.


    and I sold it cause I thought it was too heavy, and I wanted to go
    faster. pretty much the only thing I regret from all my years of
    cycling. I never got inspired to go out and ride the "new" lighter
    bike, and my road cycling declined dramatically.

    That bike felt sooo solid, yet so smooth, and it had paint a mile
    thick. Lemon yellow and a soft magenta/purple color. Big honkin
    chrome fork so well made you could not see any joint or line at the
    drop-out/tube junction.

    Tear drop down, flatened top tube, almost imperceptible taper to the
    seat tube (I had to measure it to make sure it did, but it did!)
    resulting in a 25.0 seat post. Chainstays were triangular on one side,
    round on the other, seat stays were a graceful non tapered tube, to a
    fast back lug. Georgous bike.

    Bought it from Colorado Cyclist back when it was just them and Nashbar,
    and you bought from one or the other, not both, depending on how much
    of a Fred you were. Paid $275 and it was regularly 1299. I think no
    one liked the color. Sold it to a girl at Middlebury College many
    years later for 250 bucks, on ebay. that is full circle for you.

    J
     
  15. "jerry in vermont" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > flatened top tube,


    IIRC, the teminology Columbus used was "lozenge shaped"
     
  16. Donald Munro

    Donald Munro Guest

    Howard Kveck wrote:
    > Bob, it's all about personal preferences. Nothing more. I know that Treks are
    > well made, well equipped, ride great and have a great warranty. But I don't want
    > one. Personal preference. Pretty much the same as Jerry, probabbly.


    In my case the Trek geometry simply doesn't work for me (my first bike
    back in the mid nineties was an early OCLV). My carbon Giant TCR works
    great though even though I expect all the bike snobs must look down on it.
     
  17. jerry in vermont wrote:
    >
    > it has nothing to do with performance, in fact. it has to do with the
    > fact that its a TREK. I raced on a Univega in high school. It was
    > sweet, I thought, back then. I would not own a Univega now even if
    > they did still make bikes that were equivalent to a TREK.
    >
    > Its a bike culture thing. I come from a time when treks (and univegas)
    > were LAME. Colnago is cool. A nice Ciocc is cool.




    <snip>



    Goddamm.

    You are a loser.



    best wishes,

    K. Gringioni.
     
  18. I'm not sure if it's a comment on my getting older (30 in under a
    month) or my longer-term goals shifting, but for some reason I'm WAY
    more excited about getting this rain bike than my race bike in previous
    years. Yeah, pretty sure it's just me getting old.
    -a
     
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