Diet for oldie on tour.

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by iainQlang, Apr 15, 2003.

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  1. iainQlang

    iainQlang Guest

    . Can anyone suggest general guidelines on what to eat and what not to eat for an overweight
    wrinklie who wants to get out and about after too many years driving a desk?

    I'm not looking for esoteric diets, just general info. F'rinstance, I keep hearing about pasta and
    bananas and carbohydrates'n'stuff.

    I do lots of fruit right now, and I jus' *lurv* pasta.

    What do the Fat figures on the sides of jars really mean in this context?

    No extreme cycling involved, just from hostel to hostel in the summer.

    Yooors,

    Iain. The friendliest Cycling Club in Scotland! www.johnstone-wheelers.co.uk
     
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  2. Si Davies

    Si Davies Guest

    you'll probably be doing a lot more exercise while on tour than at home so your required calorie
    intake will be greater - when I'm touring i generally start off being good: going for high carb,
    low fat foods - pasta, rice, potatos, etc. Plenty of fruit, and drink lots of water. However, by
    the 4th day it's usually a case of eat anything and everything i see, with plenty of seconds if
    possible.... For instance, on the end to end I would have for breakfast museli, fruit, beans,
    bacon, fried egg, fried bread, toast, etc for lunch a large pub meal, eg lasagne and chips, for
    dinner another large meal, eg indian, italian, etc. With plenty of snacks during the day. Ended up
    losing 10 lbs in two weeks!

    But, yes, try to stick to low fat and high carb - the fat is harder to digest - carbs will replenish
    tired muscles quicker. Also try to 'graze' during the day - eat little and often, something like
    bits of malt loaf or bananas or dates, etc. Have plenty of water to wash it all down.

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > . Can anyone suggest general guidelines on what to eat and what not to eat for an overweight
    > wrinklie who wants to get out and about after too many years driving a desk?
    >
    > I'm not looking for esoteric diets, just general info. F'rinstance, I keep hearing about pasta and
    > bananas and carbohydrates'n'stuff.
    >
    > I do lots of fruit right now, and I jus' *lurv* pasta.
    >
    > What do the Fat figures on the sides of jars really mean in this context?
    >
    > No extreme cycling involved, just from hostel to hostel in the summer.
    >
    > Yooors,
    >
    > Iain. The friendliest Cycling Club in Scotland! www.johnstone-wheelers.co.uk
     
  3. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > . Can anyone suggest general guidelines on what to eat and what not to eat for an overweight
    > wrinklie who wants to get out and about after too many years driving a desk?

    I think that when you are touring you simply do not have to worry about your food. in 'normal life'
    we are in the equivalent of a permanent time of rest & plenty. Hence the diet industry is able to
    sell us various wild schemes for eating less.

    Once touring we go into a different mode -- where we eat to fulfil our immediate (well, daily)
    energy needs. The body's natural control systems take over and operates properly.

    Personally I have found :-

    1. I always lose some weight touring.

    2. I often eat smaller portions because I don't want more.

    3. My body tells me when I'm hungry so I stop and eat.

    4. Rich stuff (typically high fat or high protein) either lays on the gut or repeats for hours
    so, after one or two mistakes I tend to eat simpler, carbohydrate rich foods. Again, little
    thought is required -- by day two or three the system just tells me a pasta salad is more
    attractive than a steak, chips and grease dinner.

    5. Breakfast becomes attractive.

    Enjoy the tour.

    T
     
  4. Go for what you like & what you can get, preferably before you're hungry. Make sure you
    drink enough.

    I like cake (preferably washed down with large quantities of weak tea in a Tea Shoppe). Dried fruit
    is nice but needs large amounts of water with it (Also beware effects on bowel!)

    Flapjacks are rather fatty but travel fairly well. (Chocolate is fairly useless in a warm pannier or
    on a winter's day; bananas seldom survive my panniers) I like liquorice allsorts.

    In general, meat is digested slowly and best taken in the evening meal.

    Try to make sure you always have a small snack in your bag as your muscles can fail from low
    carbohydrate rather suddenly & unexpectedly, even if you're taking it easy (especially if you are
    unaccustomed to exercise)

    We are all different and that which works for me might not help you.

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  5. Dave

    Dave Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > . Can anyone suggest general guidelines on what to eat and what not to eat for an overweight
    > wrinklie who wants to get out and about after too many years driving a desk?
    >
    > I'm not looking for esoteric diets, just general info. F'rinstance, I keep hearing about pasta and
    > bananas and carbohydrates'n'stuff.
    >
    > I do lots of fruit right now, and I jus' *lurv* pasta.
    >
    > What do the Fat figures on the sides of jars really mean in this context?
    >
    > No extreme cycling involved, just from hostel to hostel in the summer.
    >
    > Yooors,
    >
    > Iain. The friendliest Cycling Club in Scotland! www.johnstone-wheelers.co.uk
    Iain, I recently asked a similar question of this group before completing the end to end. I was
    planning 100 miles per day for 9-10 days and had previously only done a 65 mile ride with days after
    to recover. The best piece of advice I had was mixed dried fruit and unsalted peanuts. Every couple
    of hours I would stop and have a couple of handfuls of each. As the individual that imparted the
    advice stated 'no-ones ever overdosed on fruit and nut' (although I've had a bloody good try when
    surrounded by cadburys dairy milk chocolate ;-). In addition to this I'd have as big a breakfast as
    possible (OJ, muesli, fruit, fry-up, toast & honey - or variations thereupon), along with a decent
    evening meal. I'd indulge in something for midday such as cream scone tea, very civilised!!. I also
    drank approximately 6-8 litres of water a day too.....added orange squash or some variant during the
    latter half of the trip. I had no problems with bowels etc due to sudden switch to high fruit diet,
    system seemed to use everything up that was thrown at it. Lost half a stone and am 42. Back into
    cycling after 23 years driving the desk. Cheers, Dave
    p.s. - most importantly, have fun ;-)
     
  6. W K

    W K Guest

    "Tony W" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Once touring we go into a different mode -- where we eat to fulfil our immediate (well, daily)
    > energy needs. The body's natural control systems take over and operates properly.

    I like the way you slip in "daily" there. Of course - get it wrong and after 1 hour of cycling you
    can have a situation where your body hasn't got the message across for you to stop and eat.

    So, regular pit stops for snacks of carbohydrates- stuff like malt loaf, oatcakes etc.

    As for what else to eat, full english breakfast or if in foreign climes whatever there is. Duck
    entrails and goose grease featured strongly the summer before last.
     
  7. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > . Can anyone suggest general guidelines on what to eat and what not to eat for an overweight
    > wrinklie who wants to get out and about after too many years driving a desk?
    >
    > I'm not looking for esoteric diets, just general info. F'rinstance, I keep hearing about pasta and
    > bananas and carbohydrates'n'stuff.
    >

    Advice from "Cycling Britain" book.
    http://www.simonmason.karoo.net/zfood.htm

    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  8. Andrew

    Andrew Guest

    Can't disagree with anything that has been written here, it all seems perfectly rational.

    Plenty of carbs & a bit of what you fancy.

    I am a great believer in your body telling you what it needs. Consequently if you fancy a particular
    food eat it, you probably need it. Even if its not "good" for you you'll soon burn the calories off.

    Apparently some pregnant women's cravings, even the bizarre ones, are based around the need for
    certain nutrients or trace elements.

    --
    Andrew

    "Look laddie, if you're in the penalty area and aren't quite sure what to do with the ball, just
    stick it in the net and we'll discuss all your options afterwards." <[email protected]>
    wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > . Can anyone suggest general guidelines on what to eat and what not to eat for an overweight
    > wrinklie who wants to get out and about after too many years driving a desk?
    >
    > I'm not looking for esoteric diets, just general info. F'rinstance, I keep hearing about pasta and
    > bananas and carbohydrates'n'stuff.
    >
    > I do lots of fruit right now, and I jus' *lurv* pasta.
    >
    > What do the Fat figures on the sides of jars really mean in this context?
    >
    > No extreme cycling involved, just from hostel to hostel in the summer.
    >
    > Yooors,
    >
    > Iain. The friendliest Cycling Club in Scotland! www.johnstone-wheelers.co.uk
     
  9. My experience.

    You have to eat protein AND carbohydrate.

    Keep the fat down.
     
  10. iainQlang

    iainQlang Guest

    Thanx to everyone for the advice - much appreciated!

    Yooors,

    Iain. The friendliest Cycling Club in Scotland! www.johnstone-wheelers.co.uk
     
  11. Andy Dingley

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On Sun, 13 Apr 2003 16:25:42 +0100, "tony R" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I've always found my tyres nastily tight (Top Touring and then Top Touring
    >2000)

    TT's were always infamously tight, especially on Mavic rims.
     
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