diet & human evolution

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by John Sankey, Jul 24, 2005.

  1. John Sankey

    John Sankey Guest

    According to recent genetic research, it seems that the male
    chromosome of most of the non-African world came out of Africa
    maybe 50k years ago, then spent several tens of thousands of
    years in northern latitudes before spreading over the earth.

    Our brain is made up of many things, but omega-3 lipids are
    obviously crucial.

    It's easy to see how people on the shores of Lake Tanganyika got
    omega-3's - fish. But, where did they get them on the steppes of
    northern Europe/Asia? I'm wondering if maybe that's why it took
    so long for northern Eurasians to conquer the planet - that they
    had to find a much more efficient way of producing or conserving
    those essential brain lipids than was needed in Africa.

    So, here's the question: where do modern people who rely totally
    upon northern non-fish food sources get their birthright of
    omega-3's for their brains? Laplanders and a few northern
    Siberian tribes are about all that's left of the northern
    'Palaeolithic' diet. I'd appreciate references.
     
    Tags:


  2. realjob

    realjob Guest

    Omega-3's are not only found in fish. Alpha Linolenic Acid is an omega-3 and
    is in these concentrations: Canola oil 10%, flaxseed or linseed oil 57%,
    black currant oil 14%, soybean oil 7%. Michael R. and Mary Dan Eades, M.D.,
    Protein Power, Bantam Books, 1996

    "Different types of omega-3s. Key omega-3 fatty acids include
    eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA), both found
    primarily in oily cold-water fish such as tuna, salmon, and mackerel. Aside
    from fresh seaweed, a staple of many cultures, plant foods rarely contain
    EPA or DHA.

    However, a third omega-3, called alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), is found
    primarily in dark green leafy vegetables, flaxseed oils, and certain
    vegetable oils. Although ALA has different effects on the body than EPA and
    DHA do, the body has enzymes that can convert ALA to EPA. All three are
    important to human health." *Preceeding was taken from the link below*

    http://www.wholehealthmd.com/refshelf/substances_view/1,1525,992,00.html

    Not all Omega-3's are necessarily good for you though. In "Protein Power"
    the case is made that ALA "slows down the gatekeeper"-delta 6 desaturase.
    This enzyme controls Linoleic Acid amounts used to synthesize eicosanoids
    into Series 1 and 2. Series 1's being generally good and Series 2 generally
    bad.

    This is how I understand it anyway.

    Dave



    "John Sankey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    >


    > According to recent genetic research, it seems that the male


    > chromosome of most of the non-African world came out of Africa maybe


    > 50k years ago, then spent several tens of thousands of years in


    > northern latitudes before spreading over the earth.


    >


    > Our brain is made up of many things, but omega-3 lipids are obviously


    > crucial.


    >


    > It's easy to see how people on the shores of Lake Tanganyika got


    > omega-3's - fish. But, where did they get them on the steppes of


    > northern Europe/Asia? I'm wondering if maybe that's why it took so


    > long for northern Eurasians to conquer the planet - that they had to


    > find a much more efficient way of producing or conserving those


    > essential brain lipids than was needed in Africa.


    >


    > So, here's the question: where do modern people who rely totally upon


    > northern non-fish food sources get their birthright of omega-3's for


    > their brains? Laplanders and a few northern Siberian tribes are about


    > all that's left of the northern 'Palaeolithic' diet. I'd appreciate


    > referenc
     
  3. st7

    st7 Guest

    John Sankey wrote:
    : where do modern people who rely totally
    > upon northern non-fish food sources get their birthright of
    > omega-3's for their brains? Laplanders and a few northern
    > Siberian tribes are about all that's left of the northern
    > 'Palaeolithic' diet. I'd appreciate references.


    The 'Paleolithic' diet is probably not a model to follow. The
    first 90% of the last 150,000 years of our evolutionary history
    is likely to be more biologically appropriate than the last 10%
    regarding cancer risks (and also likely, longevity):

    Urology. 2001 Apr;57(4 Suppl 1):31-8.

    Similarities of prostate and breast cancer: Evolution, diet, and estrogens.

    Coffey DS.

    James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, The Johns Hopkins Hospital,
    Baltimore, Maryland 21287-2101, USA.

    Environment determines the risk of both prostate and breast cancer, and
    this risk can vary >10-fold. In contrast, no risk exists for human
    seminal vesicle cancer demonstrating tissue specificity. There is also
    species specificity, because there is no risk for prostate cancer in any
    other aging mammal except the dog. A study of evolution indicates that
    the prostate and breast appeared at the same time 65 million years ago
    with the development of mammals. All male mammals have a prostate;
    however, the seminal vesicles are variable and are determined by the
    diet so that species primarily eating meat do not have seminal vesicles.
    The exception is the human, who has seminal vesicles and consumes meat,
    although this is a recent dietary change. Human lineage departed from
    other higher primates 8 million years ago. The closest existing primate
    to humans is the bonobo (pigmy chimpanzee), which does not eat meat but
    exists primarily on a high fruit and fresh vegetable diet. Homo sapiens
    evolved only about 150,000 years ago, and only in the last 10% of that
    time (10 to 15 thousand years ago) did humans and dogs dramatically
    alter their diets. This is the time when humans domesticated the dog,
    bred animals, grew crops, and cooked, processed, and stored meats and
    vegetables. **All current epidemiologic evidence and suggestions for
    preventing prostate and breast cancer in humans indicates that we should
    return to the original diets under which our ancestors evolved. The
    recent development of the Western-type diet is associated with breast
    and prostate cancer throughout the world.** It is believed that the
    exposure to and metabolism of estrogens, and the dietary intake of
    phytoestrogens, combined with fat intake, obesity, and burned food
    processing may all be related to hormonal carcinogenesis and oxidative
    DNA damage. An explanatory model is proposed.

    PMID: 11295592 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    some excerpts from the full paper:

    "There appear to be very similar lifestyle risk factors accompanying
    both prostate and breast cancer, including a lower risk associated with
    high intake of fruits, vegetables, fiber, and soy products and,
    alternatively, a higher risk associated with increased intake of red
    meat, animal fats, dairy products, and steroid exposure, as well as body
    mass and birth weight."

    "Approximately 7 million years ago humans evolved from a common ape
    ancestor, with our closest relative being the pigmy chimpanzee called
    the bonobo. Like the other great apes, the bonobo eats primarily fruits
    and vegetables and no meat."

    "Other types of chimpanzees occasionally eat meat as opportunist
    scavengers, sometimes even with very limited hunting. Even in humans,
    highly effective hunting was not the major source of high meat caloric
    intake until later in human development. When early hominoids such as
    "Lucy" came down from the trees 4 million years ago and began to roam
    the savannas, they picked up the ability to become hunter-gatherers."

    "This major phase shift in food style occurred only about 10,000 years
    ago, when humans became farmers and domesticated both plants and
    animals. This technology quickly evolved into a tighter focusing of
    human diets from wild fresh vegetables and fruits to an eating pattern
    toward limited plants that could be domesticated and grown in great
    quantities and stored, like wheat, rice, barley, corn, potatoes, and
    other tubers. This resulted in approximately 20 plant types rapidly
    replacing the high diversity of 3,000 plants and fruits that were
    earlier eaten fresh as they came into season and were gathered from the
    wild. With large-scale domestication and breeding of cattle came a high
    meat intake, and this was combined with storage, curing, drying, and
    cooking as well as a propensity to use milk and cheese from dairy
    processing. Cooking, burning, and smoking produce high levels of
    heterocyclic molecules, many of which make adducts to DNA, and are
    carcinogens."

    "Since separating from the great apes and chimpanzees approximately 8
    million years ago, humans evolved into Homo sapiens sapiens that are
    very similar to our present form in little as 150,000 years. However, we
    dramatically changed to a Western-style diet only in the very recent
    past (ie, 15,000 years)--at a pace much faster than we could
    biologically evolve (Table V). This Western diet consists of high meat
    and fat; dairy products; stored, processed, and cooked meats; and low
    fruit and fiber intake, along with a more sedentary lifestyle."

    "In summary, we were not biologically selected by the evolution process
    to eat the way we do today, and the damage is manifested in prostate and
    breast cancer. Indeed, all of the present suggestions of the National
    Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society as to how Americans
    might reduce their chances of getting prostate and breast cancer revolve
    around adapting dietary changes in our lifestyle back toward the early
    human diet of more fruits; a variety of fresh vegetables and fiber; less
    burning, cooking, and processing; diminished intake of dairy products,
    red meat, and animal fats, as well as decreasing weight and increasing
    aerobic exercise. That is, we must return to a diet and lifestyle that
    more closely matches the first 135,000 years before technology modified
    our lifestyle and diet."

    TABLE V. Human development and the change of diet
    Time During Human Development (150,000 years)
    First 90% (135,000 years) ; Last 10% (15,000 years)
    Diet: high; low
    Fruit: high ; low
    Fiber: high; low
    Plant diversity: high (3000); low (20)
    Red meat: low; high
    Animal fat: low; high
    Dairy products: low; high
    Food: fresh/wild ; cooked/preserved
    Movement: High; Sedentary

    "Certainly, looking for simple relation will not be sufficient, but
    delineating the exact mechanisms of cell cycle control and stem cell
    development in prostate cancer should be helpful in understanding these
    early preneoplastic lesions and their relation to diet. In the end, we
    still must explain why approximately 90% of prostate and breast cancers
    are sporadic and acquired, and why only 10% are directly inherited in a
    Mendelian manner. The acquired cancers may indicate why this phenomenon
    is so geographically centered and may be capable of being altered. If
    these cancers are set in place within the neonatal or developmental
    periods, as has been proposed by many, then this process will require
    far more research to unravel the timing of these critical events."
     
  4. RBR

    RBR Guest

    Thanks for this post!

    RBR

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 02:44:50 GMT, st7 <[email protected]> wrote:

    >John Sankey wrote:
    >: where do modern people who rely totally
    >> upon northern non-fish food sources get their birthright of
    >> omega-3's for their brains? Laplanders and a few northern
    >> Siberian tribes are about all that's left of the northern
    >> 'Palaeolithic' diet. I'd appreciate references.

    >
    >The 'Paleolithic' diet is probably not a model to follow. The
    >first 90% of the last 150,000 years of our evolutionary history
    >is likely to be more biologically appropriate than the last 10%
    >regarding cancer risks (and also likely, longevity):
    >
    >Urology. 2001 Apr;57(4 Suppl 1):31-8.
    >
    >Similarities of prostate and breast cancer: Evolution, diet, and estrogens.
    >
    >Coffey DS.
    >
    >James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, The Johns Hopkins Hospital,
    >Baltimore, Maryland 21287-2101, USA.
    >
    >Environment determines the risk of both prostate and breast cancer, and
    >this risk can vary >10-fold. In contrast, no risk exists for human
    >seminal vesicle cancer demonstrating tissue specificity. There is also
    >species specificity, because there is no risk for prostate cancer in any
    >other aging mammal except the dog. A study of evolution indicates that
    >the prostate and breast appeared at the same time 65 million years ago
    >with the development of mammals. All male mammals have a prostate;
    >however, the seminal vesicles are variable and are determined by the
    >diet so that species primarily eating meat do not have seminal vesicles.
    >The exception is the human, who has seminal vesicles and consumes meat,
    >although this is a recent dietary change. Human lineage departed from
    >other higher primates 8 million years ago. The closest existing primate
    >to humans is the bonobo (pigmy chimpanzee), which does not eat meat but
    >exists primarily on a high fruit and fresh vegetable diet. Homo sapiens
    >evolved only about 150,000 years ago, and only in the last 10% of that
    >time (10 to 15 thousand years ago) did humans and dogs dramatically
    >alter their diets. This is the time when humans domesticated the dog,
    >bred animals, grew crops, and cooked, processed, and stored meats and
    >vegetables. **All current epidemiologic evidence and suggestions for
    >preventing prostate and breast cancer in humans indicates that we should
    >return to the original diets under which our ancestors evolved. The
    >recent development of the Western-type diet is associated with breast
    >and prostate cancer throughout the world.** It is believed that the
    >exposure to and metabolism of estrogens, and the dietary intake of
    >phytoestrogens, combined with fat intake, obesity, and burned food
    >processing may all be related to hormonal carcinogenesis and oxidative
    >DNA damage. An explanatory model is proposed.
    >
    >PMID: 11295592 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    >
    >some excerpts from the full paper:
    >
    >"There appear to be very similar lifestyle risk factors accompanying
    >both prostate and breast cancer, including a lower risk associated with
    >high intake of fruits, vegetables, fiber, and soy products and,
    >alternatively, a higher risk associated with increased intake of red
    >meat, animal fats, dairy products, and steroid exposure, as well as body
    >mass and birth weight."
    >
    >"Approximately 7 million years ago humans evolved from a common ape
    >ancestor, with our closest relative being the pigmy chimpanzee called
    >the bonobo. Like the other great apes, the bonobo eats primarily fruits
    >and vegetables and no meat."
    >
    >"Other types of chimpanzees occasionally eat meat as opportunist
    >scavengers, sometimes even with very limited hunting. Even in humans,
    >highly effective hunting was not the major source of high meat caloric
    >intake until later in human development. When early hominoids such as
    >"Lucy" came down from the trees 4 million years ago and began to roam
    >the savannas, they picked up the ability to become hunter-gatherers."
    >
    >"This major phase shift in food style occurred only about 10,000 years
    >ago, when humans became farmers and domesticated both plants and
    >animals. This technology quickly evolved into a tighter focusing of
    >human diets from wild fresh vegetables and fruits to an eating pattern
    >toward limited plants that could be domesticated and grown in great
    >quantities and stored, like wheat, rice, barley, corn, potatoes, and
    >other tubers. This resulted in approximately 20 plant types rapidly
    >replacing the high diversity of 3,000 plants and fruits that were
    >earlier eaten fresh as they came into season and were gathered from the
    >wild. With large-scale domestication and breeding of cattle came a high
    >meat intake, and this was combined with storage, curing, drying, and
    >cooking as well as a propensity to use milk and cheese from dairy
    >processing. Cooking, burning, and smoking produce high levels of
    >heterocyclic molecules, many of which make adducts to DNA, and are
    >carcinogens."
    >
    >"Since separating from the great apes and chimpanzees approximately 8
    >million years ago, humans evolved into Homo sapiens sapiens that are
    >very similar to our present form in little as 150,000 years. However, we
    >dramatically changed to a Western-style diet only in the very recent
    >past (ie, 15,000 years)--at a pace much faster than we could
    >biologically evolve (Table V). This Western diet consists of high meat
    >and fat; dairy products; stored, processed, and cooked meats; and low
    >fruit and fiber intake, along with a more sedentary lifestyle."
    >
    >"In summary, we were not biologically selected by the evolution process
    >to eat the way we do today, and the damage is manifested in prostate and
    >breast cancer. Indeed, all of the present suggestions of the National
    >Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society as to how Americans
    >might reduce their chances of getting prostate and breast cancer revolve
    >around adapting dietary changes in our lifestyle back toward the early
    >human diet of more fruits; a variety of fresh vegetables and fiber; less
    >burning, cooking, and processing; diminished intake of dairy products,
    >red meat, and animal fats, as well as decreasing weight and increasing
    >aerobic exercise. That is, we must return to a diet and lifestyle that
    >more closely matches the first 135,000 years before technology modified
    >our lifestyle and diet."
    >
    >TABLE V. Human development and the change of diet
    >Time During Human Development (150,000 years)
    >First 90% (135,000 years) ; Last 10% (15,000 years)
    >Diet: high; low
    >Fruit: high ; low
    >Fiber: high; low
    >Plant diversity: high (3000); low (20)
    >Red meat: low; high
    >Animal fat: low; high
    >Dairy products: low; high
    >Food: fresh/wild ; cooked/preserved
    >Movement: High; Sedentary
    >
    >"Certainly, looking for simple relation will not be sufficient, but
    >delineating the exact mechanisms of cell cycle control and stem cell
    >development in prostate cancer should be helpful in understanding these
    >early preneoplastic lesions and their relation to diet. In the end, we
    >still must explain why approximately 90% of prostate and breast cancers
    >are sporadic and acquired, and why only 10% are directly inherited in a
    >Mendelian manner. The acquired cancers may indicate why this phenomenon
    >is so geographically centered and may be capable of being altered. If
    >these cancers are set in place within the neonatal or developmental
    >periods, as has been proposed by many, then this process will require
    >far more research to unravel the timing of these critical events."
     
  5. RBR

    RBR Guest

    Thanks for this post!

    RBR

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 02:44:50 GMT, st7 <[email protected]> wrote:

    >John Sankey wrote:
    >: where do modern people who rely totally
    >> upon northern non-fish food sources get their birthright of
    >> omega-3's for their brains? Laplanders and a few northern
    >> Siberian tribes are about all that's left of the northern
    >> 'Palaeolithic' diet. I'd appreciate references.

    >
    >The 'Paleolithic' diet is probably not a model to follow. The
    >first 90% of the last 150,000 years of our evolutionary history
    >is likely to be more biologically appropriate than the last 10%
    >regarding cancer risks (and also likely, longevity):
    >
    >Urology. 2001 Apr;57(4 Suppl 1):31-8.
    >
    >Similarities of prostate and breast cancer: Evolution, diet, and estrogens.
    >
    >Coffey DS.
    >
    >James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, The Johns Hopkins Hospital,
    >Baltimore, Maryland 21287-2101, USA.
    >
    >Environment determines the risk of both prostate and breast cancer, and
    >this risk can vary >10-fold. In contrast, no risk exists for human
    >seminal vesicle cancer demonstrating tissue specificity. There is also
    >species specificity, because there is no risk for prostate cancer in any
    >other aging mammal except the dog. A study of evolution indicates that
    >the prostate and breast appeared at the same time 65 million years ago
    >with the development of mammals. All male mammals have a prostate;
    >however, the seminal vesicles are variable and are determined by the
    >diet so that species primarily eating meat do not have seminal vesicles.
    >The exception is the human, who has seminal vesicles and consumes meat,
    >although this is a recent dietary change. Human lineage departed from
    >other higher primates 8 million years ago. The closest existing primate
    >to humans is the bonobo (pigmy chimpanzee), which does not eat meat but
    >exists primarily on a high fruit and fresh vegetable diet. Homo sapiens
    >evolved only about 150,000 years ago, and only in the last 10% of that
    >time (10 to 15 thousand years ago) did humans and dogs dramatically
    >alter their diets. This is the time when humans domesticated the dog,
    >bred animals, grew crops, and cooked, processed, and stored meats and
    >vegetables. **All current epidemiologic evidence and suggestions for
    >preventing prostate and breast cancer in humans indicates that we should
    >return to the original diets under which our ancestors evolved. The
    >recent development of the Western-type diet is associated with breast
    >and prostate cancer throughout the world.** It is believed that the
    >exposure to and metabolism of estrogens, and the dietary intake of
    >phytoestrogens, combined with fat intake, obesity, and burned food
    >processing may all be related to hormonal carcinogenesis and oxidative
    >DNA damage. An explanatory model is proposed.
    >
    >PMID: 11295592 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    >
    >some excerpts from the full paper:
    >
    >"There appear to be very similar lifestyle risk factors accompanying
    >both prostate and breast cancer, including a lower risk associated with
    >high intake of fruits, vegetables, fiber, and soy products and,
    >alternatively, a higher risk associated with increased intake of red
    >meat, animal fats, dairy products, and steroid exposure, as well as body
    >mass and birth weight."
    >
    >"Approximately 7 million years ago humans evolved from a common ape
    >ancestor, with our closest relative being the pigmy chimpanzee called
    >the bonobo. Like the other great apes, the bonobo eats primarily fruits
    >and vegetables and no meat."
    >
    >"Other types of chimpanzees occasionally eat meat as opportunist
    >scavengers, sometimes even with very limited hunting. Even in humans,
    >highly effective hunting was not the major source of high meat caloric
    >intake until later in human development. When early hominoids such as
    >"Lucy" came down from the trees 4 million years ago and began to roam
    >the savannas, they picked up the ability to become hunter-gatherers."
    >
    >"This major phase shift in food style occurred only about 10,000 years
    >ago, when humans became farmers and domesticated both plants and
    >animals. This technology quickly evolved into a tighter focusing of
    >human diets from wild fresh vegetables and fruits to an eating pattern
    >toward limited plants that could be domesticated and grown in great
    >quantities and stored, like wheat, rice, barley, corn, potatoes, and
    >other tubers. This resulted in approximately 20 plant types rapidly
    >replacing the high diversity of 3,000 plants and fruits that were
    >earlier eaten fresh as they came into season and were gathered from the
    >wild. With large-scale domestication and breeding of cattle came a high
    >meat intake, and this was combined with storage, curing, drying, and
    >cooking as well as a propensity to use milk and cheese from dairy
    >processing. Cooking, burning, and smoking produce high levels of
    >heterocyclic molecules, many of which make adducts to DNA, and are
    >carcinogens."
    >
    >"Since separating from the great apes and chimpanzees approximately 8
    >million years ago, humans evolved into Homo sapiens sapiens that are
    >very similar to our present form in little as 150,000 years. However, we
    >dramatically changed to a Western-style diet only in the very recent
    >past (ie, 15,000 years)--at a pace much faster than we could
    >biologically evolve (Table V). This Western diet consists of high meat
    >and fat; dairy products; stored, processed, and cooked meats; and low
    >fruit and fiber intake, along with a more sedentary lifestyle."
    >
    >"In summary, we were not biologically selected by the evolution process
    >to eat the way we do today, and the damage is manifested in prostate and
    >breast cancer. Indeed, all of the present suggestions of the National
    >Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society as to how Americans
    >might reduce their chances of getting prostate and breast cancer revolve
    >around adapting dietary changes in our lifestyle back toward the early
    >human diet of more fruits; a variety of fresh vegetables and fiber; less
    >burning, cooking, and processing; diminished intake of dairy products,
    >red meat, and animal fats, as well as decreasing weight and increasing
    >aerobic exercise. That is, we must return to a diet and lifestyle that
    >more closely matches the first 135,000 years before technology modified
    >our lifestyle and diet."
    >
    >TABLE V. Human development and the change of diet
    >Time During Human Development (150,000 years)
    >First 90% (135,000 years) ; Last 10% (15,000 years)
    >Diet: high; low
    >Fruit: high ; low
    >Fiber: high; low
    >Plant diversity: high (3000); low (20)
    >Red meat: low; high
    >Animal fat: low; high
    >Dairy products: low; high
    >Food: fresh/wild ; cooked/preserved
    >Movement: High; Sedentary
    >
    >"Certainly, looking for simple relation will not be sufficient, but
    >delineating the exact mechanisms of cell cycle control and stem cell
    >development in prostate cancer should be helpful in understanding these
    >early preneoplastic lesions and their relation to diet. In the end, we
    >still must explain why approximately 90% of prostate and breast cancers
    >are sporadic and acquired, and why only 10% are directly inherited in a
    >Mendelian manner. The acquired cancers may indicate why this phenomenon
    >is so geographically centered and may be capable of being altered. If
    >these cancers are set in place within the neonatal or developmental
    >periods, as has been proposed by many, then this process will require
    >far more research to unravel the timing of these critical events."
     
  6. RBR

    RBR Guest

    Thanks for this post!

    RBR

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 02:44:50 GMT, st7 <[email protected]> wrote:

    >John Sankey wrote:
    >: where do modern people who rely totally
    >> upon northern non-fish food sources get their birthright of
    >> omega-3's for their brains? Laplanders and a few northern
    >> Siberian tribes are about all that's left of the northern
    >> 'Palaeolithic' diet. I'd appreciate references.

    >
    >The 'Paleolithic' diet is probably not a model to follow. The
    >first 90% of the last 150,000 years of our evolutionary history
    >is likely to be more biologically appropriate than the last 10%
    >regarding cancer risks (and also likely, longevity):
    >
    >Urology. 2001 Apr;57(4 Suppl 1):31-8.
    >
    >Similarities of prostate and breast cancer: Evolution, diet, and estrogens.
    >
    >Coffey DS.
    >
    >James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, The Johns Hopkins Hospital,
    >Baltimore, Maryland 21287-2101, USA.
    >
    >Environment determines the risk of both prostate and breast cancer, and
    >this risk can vary >10-fold. In contrast, no risk exists for human
    >seminal vesicle cancer demonstrating tissue specificity. There is also
    >species specificity, because there is no risk for prostate cancer in any
    >other aging mammal except the dog. A study of evolution indicates that
    >the prostate and breast appeared at the same time 65 million years ago
    >with the development of mammals. All male mammals have a prostate;
    >however, the seminal vesicles are variable and are determined by the
    >diet so that species primarily eating meat do not have seminal vesicles.
    >The exception is the human, who has seminal vesicles and consumes meat,
    >although this is a recent dietary change. Human lineage departed from
    >other higher primates 8 million years ago. The closest existing primate
    >to humans is the bonobo (pigmy chimpanzee), which does not eat meat but
    >exists primarily on a high fruit and fresh vegetable diet. Homo sapiens
    >evolved only about 150,000 years ago, and only in the last 10% of that
    >time (10 to 15 thousand years ago) did humans and dogs dramatically
    >alter their diets. This is the time when humans domesticated the dog,
    >bred animals, grew crops, and cooked, processed, and stored meats and
    >vegetables. **All current epidemiologic evidence and suggestions for
    >preventing prostate and breast cancer in humans indicates that we should
    >return to the original diets under which our ancestors evolved. The
    >recent development of the Western-type diet is associated with breast
    >and prostate cancer throughout the world.** It is believed that the
    >exposure to and metabolism of estrogens, and the dietary intake of
    >phytoestrogens, combined with fat intake, obesity, and burned food
    >processing may all be related to hormonal carcinogenesis and oxidative
    >DNA damage. An explanatory model is proposed.
    >
    >PMID: 11295592 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    >
    >some excerpts from the full paper:
    >
    >"There appear to be very similar lifestyle risk factors accompanying
    >both prostate and breast cancer, including a lower risk associated with
    >high intake of fruits, vegetables, fiber, and soy products and,
    >alternatively, a higher risk associated with increased intake of red
    >meat, animal fats, dairy products, and steroid exposure, as well as body
    >mass and birth weight."
    >
    >"Approximately 7 million years ago humans evolved from a common ape
    >ancestor, with our closest relative being the pigmy chimpanzee called
    >the bonobo. Like the other great apes, the bonobo eats primarily fruits
    >and vegetables and no meat."
    >
    >"Other types of chimpanzees occasionally eat meat as opportunist
    >scavengers, sometimes even with very limited hunting. Even in humans,
    >highly effective hunting was not the major source of high meat caloric
    >intake until later in human development. When early hominoids such as
    >"Lucy" came down from the trees 4 million years ago and began to roam
    >the savannas, they picked up the ability to become hunter-gatherers."
    >
    >"This major phase shift in food style occurred only about 10,000 years
    >ago, when humans became farmers and domesticated both plants and
    >animals. This technology quickly evolved into a tighter focusing of
    >human diets from wild fresh vegetables and fruits to an eating pattern
    >toward limited plants that could be domesticated and grown in great
    >quantities and stored, like wheat, rice, barley, corn, potatoes, and
    >other tubers. This resulted in approximately 20 plant types rapidly
    >replacing the high diversity of 3,000 plants and fruits that were
    >earlier eaten fresh as they came into season and were gathered from the
    >wild. With large-scale domestication and breeding of cattle came a high
    >meat intake, and this was combined with storage, curing, drying, and
    >cooking as well as a propensity to use milk and cheese from dairy
    >processing. Cooking, burning, and smoking produce high levels of
    >heterocyclic molecules, many of which make adducts to DNA, and are
    >carcinogens."
    >
    >"Since separating from the great apes and chimpanzees approximately 8
    >million years ago, humans evolved into Homo sapiens sapiens that are
    >very similar to our present form in little as 150,000 years. However, we
    >dramatically changed to a Western-style diet only in the very recent
    >past (ie, 15,000 years)--at a pace much faster than we could
    >biologically evolve (Table V). This Western diet consists of high meat
    >and fat; dairy products; stored, processed, and cooked meats; and low
    >fruit and fiber intake, along with a more sedentary lifestyle."
    >
    >"In summary, we were not biologically selected by the evolution process
    >to eat the way we do today, and the damage is manifested in prostate and
    >breast cancer. Indeed, all of the present suggestions of the National
    >Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society as to how Americans
    >might reduce their chances of getting prostate and breast cancer revolve
    >around adapting dietary changes in our lifestyle back toward the early
    >human diet of more fruits; a variety of fresh vegetables and fiber; less
    >burning, cooking, and processing; diminished intake of dairy products,
    >red meat, and animal fats, as well as decreasing weight and increasing
    >aerobic exercise. That is, we must return to a diet and lifestyle that
    >more closely matches the first 135,000 years before technology modified
    >our lifestyle and diet."
    >
    >TABLE V. Human development and the change of diet
    >Time During Human Development (150,000 years)
    >First 90% (135,000 years) ; Last 10% (15,000 years)
    >Diet: high; low
    >Fruit: high ; low
    >Fiber: high; low
    >Plant diversity: high (3000); low (20)
    >Red meat: low; high
    >Animal fat: low; high
    >Dairy products: low; high
    >Food: fresh/wild ; cooked/preserved
    >Movement: High; Sedentary
    >
    >"Certainly, looking for simple relation will not be sufficient, but
    >delineating the exact mechanisms of cell cycle control and stem cell
    >development in prostate cancer should be helpful in understanding these
    >early preneoplastic lesions and their relation to diet. In the end, we
    >still must explain why approximately 90% of prostate and breast cancers
    >are sporadic and acquired, and why only 10% are directly inherited in a
    >Mendelian manner. The acquired cancers may indicate why this phenomenon
    >is so geographically centered and may be capable of being altered. If
    >these cancers are set in place within the neonatal or developmental
    >periods, as has been proposed by many, then this process will require
    >far more research to unravel the timing of these critical events."
     
  7. RBR

    RBR Guest

    Thanks for this post!

    RBR

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 02:44:50 GMT, st7 <[email protected]> wrote:

    >John Sankey wrote:
    >: where do modern people who rely totally
    >> upon northern non-fish food sources get their birthright of
    >> omega-3's for their brains? Laplanders and a few northern
    >> Siberian tribes are about all that's left of the northern
    >> 'Palaeolithic' diet. I'd appreciate references.

    >
    >The 'Paleolithic' diet is probably not a model to follow. The
    >first 90% of the last 150,000 years of our evolutionary history
    >is likely to be more biologically appropriate than the last 10%
    >regarding cancer risks (and also likely, longevity):
    >
    >Urology. 2001 Apr;57(4 Suppl 1):31-8.
    >
    >Similarities of prostate and breast cancer: Evolution, diet, and estrogens.
    >
    >Coffey DS.
    >
    >James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, The Johns Hopkins Hospital,
    >Baltimore, Maryland 21287-2101, USA.
    >
    >Environment determines the risk of both prostate and breast cancer, and
    >this risk can vary >10-fold. In contrast, no risk exists for human
    >seminal vesicle cancer demonstrating tissue specificity. There is also
    >species specificity, because there is no risk for prostate cancer in any
    >other aging mammal except the dog. A study of evolution indicates that
    >the prostate and breast appeared at the same time 65 million years ago
    >with the development of mammals. All male mammals have a prostate;
    >however, the seminal vesicles are variable and are determined by the
    >diet so that species primarily eating meat do not have seminal vesicles.
    >The exception is the human, who has seminal vesicles and consumes meat,
    >although this is a recent dietary change. Human lineage departed from
    >other higher primates 8 million years ago. The closest existing primate
    >to humans is the bonobo (pigmy chimpanzee), which does not eat meat but
    >exists primarily on a high fruit and fresh vegetable diet. Homo sapiens
    >evolved only about 150,000 years ago, and only in the last 10% of that
    >time (10 to 15 thousand years ago) did humans and dogs dramatically
    >alter their diets. This is the time when humans domesticated the dog,
    >bred animals, grew crops, and cooked, processed, and stored meats and
    >vegetables. **All current epidemiologic evidence and suggestions for
    >preventing prostate and breast cancer in humans indicates that we should
    >return to the original diets under which our ancestors evolved. The
    >recent development of the Western-type diet is associated with breast
    >and prostate cancer throughout the world.** It is believed that the
    >exposure to and metabolism of estrogens, and the dietary intake of
    >phytoestrogens, combined with fat intake, obesity, and burned food
    >processing may all be related to hormonal carcinogenesis and oxidative
    >DNA damage. An explanatory model is proposed.
    >
    >PMID: 11295592 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    >
    >some excerpts from the full paper:
    >
    >"There appear to be very similar lifestyle risk factors accompanying
    >both prostate and breast cancer, including a lower risk associated with
    >high intake of fruits, vegetables, fiber, and soy products and,
    >alternatively, a higher risk associated with increased intake of red
    >meat, animal fats, dairy products, and steroid exposure, as well as body
    >mass and birth weight."
    >
    >"Approximately 7 million years ago humans evolved from a common ape
    >ancestor, with our closest relative being the pigmy chimpanzee called
    >the bonobo. Like the other great apes, the bonobo eats primarily fruits
    >and vegetables and no meat."
    >
    >"Other types of chimpanzees occasionally eat meat as opportunist
    >scavengers, sometimes even with very limited hunting. Even in humans,
    >highly effective hunting was not the major source of high meat caloric
    >intake until later in human development. When early hominoids such as
    >"Lucy" came down from the trees 4 million years ago and began to roam
    >the savannas, they picked up the ability to become hunter-gatherers."
    >
    >"This major phase shift in food style occurred only about 10,000 years
    >ago, when humans became farmers and domesticated both plants and
    >animals. This technology quickly evolved into a tighter focusing of
    >human diets from wild fresh vegetables and fruits to an eating pattern
    >toward limited plants that could be domesticated and grown in great
    >quantities and stored, like wheat, rice, barley, corn, potatoes, and
    >other tubers. This resulted in approximately 20 plant types rapidly
    >replacing the high diversity of 3,000 plants and fruits that were
    >earlier eaten fresh as they came into season and were gathered from the
    >wild. With large-scale domestication and breeding of cattle came a high
    >meat intake, and this was combined with storage, curing, drying, and
    >cooking as well as a propensity to use milk and cheese from dairy
    >processing. Cooking, burning, and smoking produce high levels of
    >heterocyclic molecules, many of which make adducts to DNA, and are
    >carcinogens."
    >
    >"Since separating from the great apes and chimpanzees approximately 8
    >million years ago, humans evolved into Homo sapiens sapiens that are
    >very similar to our present form in little as 150,000 years. However, we
    >dramatically changed to a Western-style diet only in the very recent
    >past (ie, 15,000 years)--at a pace much faster than we could
    >biologically evolve (Table V). This Western diet consists of high meat
    >and fat; dairy products; stored, processed, and cooked meats; and low
    >fruit and fiber intake, along with a more sedentary lifestyle."
    >
    >"In summary, we were not biologically selected by the evolution process
    >to eat the way we do today, and the damage is manifested in prostate and
    >breast cancer. Indeed, all of the present suggestions of the National
    >Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society as to how Americans
    >might reduce their chances of getting prostate and breast cancer revolve
    >around adapting dietary changes in our lifestyle back toward the early
    >human diet of more fruits; a variety of fresh vegetables and fiber; less
    >burning, cooking, and processing; diminished intake of dairy products,
    >red meat, and animal fats, as well as decreasing weight and increasing
    >aerobic exercise. That is, we must return to a diet and lifestyle that
    >more closely matches the first 135,000 years before technology modified
    >our lifestyle and diet."
    >
    >TABLE V. Human development and the change of diet
    >Time During Human Development (150,000 years)
    >First 90% (135,000 years) ; Last 10% (15,000 years)
    >Diet: high; low
    >Fruit: high ; low
    >Fiber: high; low
    >Plant diversity: high (3000); low (20)
    >Red meat: low; high
    >Animal fat: low; high
    >Dairy products: low; high
    >Food: fresh/wild ; cooked/preserved
    >Movement: High; Sedentary
    >
    >"Certainly, looking for simple relation will not be sufficient, but
    >delineating the exact mechanisms of cell cycle control and stem cell
    >development in prostate cancer should be helpful in understanding these
    >early preneoplastic lesions and their relation to diet. In the end, we
    >still must explain why approximately 90% of prostate and breast cancers
    >are sporadic and acquired, and why only 10% are directly inherited in a
    >Mendelian manner. The acquired cancers may indicate why this phenomenon
    >is so geographically centered and may be capable of being altered. If
    >these cancers are set in place within the neonatal or developmental
    >periods, as has been proposed by many, then this process will require
    >far more research to unravel the timing of these critical events."
     
  8. RBR

    RBR Guest

    Thanks for this post!

    RBR

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 02:44:50 GMT, st7 <[email protected]> wrote:

    >John Sankey wrote:
    >: where do modern people who rely totally
    >> upon northern non-fish food sources get their birthright of
    >> omega-3's for their brains? Laplanders and a few northern
    >> Siberian tribes are about all that's left of the northern
    >> 'Palaeolithic' diet. I'd appreciate references.

    >
    >The 'Paleolithic' diet is probably not a model to follow. The
    >first 90% of the last 150,000 years of our evolutionary history
    >is likely to be more biologically appropriate than the last 10%
    >regarding cancer risks (and also likely, longevity):
    >
    >Urology. 2001 Apr;57(4 Suppl 1):31-8.
    >
    >Similarities of prostate and breast cancer: Evolution, diet, and estrogens.
    >
    >Coffey DS.
    >
    >James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, The Johns Hopkins Hospital,
    >Baltimore, Maryland 21287-2101, USA.
    >
    >Environment determines the risk of both prostate and breast cancer, and
    >this risk can vary >10-fold. In contrast, no risk exists for human
    >seminal vesicle cancer demonstrating tissue specificity. There is also
    >species specificity, because there is no risk for prostate cancer in any
    >other aging mammal except the dog. A study of evolution indicates that
    >the prostate and breast appeared at the same time 65 million years ago
    >with the development of mammals. All male mammals have a prostate;
    >however, the seminal vesicles are variable and are determined by the
    >diet so that species primarily eating meat do not have seminal vesicles.
    >The exception is the human, who has seminal vesicles and consumes meat,
    >although this is a recent dietary change. Human lineage departed from
    >other higher primates 8 million years ago. The closest existing primate
    >to humans is the bonobo (pigmy chimpanzee), which does not eat meat but
    >exists primarily on a high fruit and fresh vegetable diet. Homo sapiens
    >evolved only about 150,000 years ago, and only in the last 10% of that
    >time (10 to 15 thousand years ago) did humans and dogs dramatically
    >alter their diets. This is the time when humans domesticated the dog,
    >bred animals, grew crops, and cooked, processed, and stored meats and
    >vegetables. **All current epidemiologic evidence and suggestions for
    >preventing prostate and breast cancer in humans indicates that we should
    >return to the original diets under which our ancestors evolved. The
    >recent development of the Western-type diet is associated with breast
    >and prostate cancer throughout the world.** It is believed that the
    >exposure to and metabolism of estrogens, and the dietary intake of
    >phytoestrogens, combined with fat intake, obesity, and burned food
    >processing may all be related to hormonal carcinogenesis and oxidative
    >DNA damage. An explanatory model is proposed.
    >
    >PMID: 11295592 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    >
    >some excerpts from the full paper:
    >
    >"There appear to be very similar lifestyle risk factors accompanying
    >both prostate and breast cancer, including a lower risk associated with
    >high intake of fruits, vegetables, fiber, and soy products and,
    >alternatively, a higher risk associated with increased intake of red
    >meat, animal fats, dairy products, and steroid exposure, as well as body
    >mass and birth weight."
    >
    >"Approximately 7 million years ago humans evolved from a common ape
    >ancestor, with our closest relative being the pigmy chimpanzee called
    >the bonobo. Like the other great apes, the bonobo eats primarily fruits
    >and vegetables and no meat."
    >
    >"Other types of chimpanzees occasionally eat meat as opportunist
    >scavengers, sometimes even with very limited hunting. Even in humans,
    >highly effective hunting was not the major source of high meat caloric
    >intake until later in human development. When early hominoids such as
    >"Lucy" came down from the trees 4 million years ago and began to roam
    >the savannas, they picked up the ability to become hunter-gatherers."
    >
    >"This major phase shift in food style occurred only about 10,000 years
    >ago, when humans became farmers and domesticated both plants and
    >animals. This technology quickly evolved into a tighter focusing of
    >human diets from wild fresh vegetables and fruits to an eating pattern
    >toward limited plants that could be domesticated and grown in great
    >quantities and stored, like wheat, rice, barley, corn, potatoes, and
    >other tubers. This resulted in approximately 20 plant types rapidly
    >replacing the high diversity of 3,000 plants and fruits that were
    >earlier eaten fresh as they came into season and were gathered from the
    >wild. With large-scale domestication and breeding of cattle came a high
    >meat intake, and this was combined with storage, curing, drying, and
    >cooking as well as a propensity to use milk and cheese from dairy
    >processing. Cooking, burning, and smoking produce high levels of
    >heterocyclic molecules, many of which make adducts to DNA, and are
    >carcinogens."
    >
    >"Since separating from the great apes and chimpanzees approximately 8
    >million years ago, humans evolved into Homo sapiens sapiens that are
    >very similar to our present form in little as 150,000 years. However, we
    >dramatically changed to a Western-style diet only in the very recent
    >past (ie, 15,000 years)--at a pace much faster than we could
    >biologically evolve (Table V). This Western diet consists of high meat
    >and fat; dairy products; stored, processed, and cooked meats; and low
    >fruit and fiber intake, along with a more sedentary lifestyle."
    >
    >"In summary, we were not biologically selected by the evolution process
    >to eat the way we do today, and the damage is manifested in prostate and
    >breast cancer. Indeed, all of the present suggestions of the National
    >Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society as to how Americans
    >might reduce their chances of getting prostate and breast cancer revolve
    >around adapting dietary changes in our lifestyle back toward the early
    >human diet of more fruits; a variety of fresh vegetables and fiber; less
    >burning, cooking, and processing; diminished intake of dairy products,
    >red meat, and animal fats, as well as decreasing weight and increasing
    >aerobic exercise. That is, we must return to a diet and lifestyle that
    >more closely matches the first 135,000 years before technology modified
    >our lifestyle and diet."
    >
    >TABLE V. Human development and the change of diet
    >Time During Human Development (150,000 years)
    >First 90% (135,000 years) ; Last 10% (15,000 years)
    >Diet: high; low
    >Fruit: high ; low
    >Fiber: high; low
    >Plant diversity: high (3000); low (20)
    >Red meat: low; high
    >Animal fat: low; high
    >Dairy products: low; high
    >Food: fresh/wild ; cooked/preserved
    >Movement: High; Sedentary
    >
    >"Certainly, looking for simple relation will not be sufficient, but
    >delineating the exact mechanisms of cell cycle control and stem cell
    >development in prostate cancer should be helpful in understanding these
    >early preneoplastic lesions and their relation to diet. In the end, we
    >still must explain why approximately 90% of prostate and breast cancers
    >are sporadic and acquired, and why only 10% are directly inherited in a
    >Mendelian manner. The acquired cancers may indicate why this phenomenon
    >is so geographically centered and may be capable of being altered. If
    >these cancers are set in place within the neonatal or developmental
    >periods, as has been proposed by many, then this process will require
    >far more research to unravel the timing of these critical events."
     
  9. RBR

    RBR Guest

    Thanks for this post!

    RBR

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 02:44:50 GMT, st7 <[email protected]> wrote:

    >John Sankey wrote:
    >: where do modern people who rely totally
    >> upon northern non-fish food sources get their birthright of
    >> omega-3's for their brains? Laplanders and a few northern
    >> Siberian tribes are about all that's left of the northern
    >> 'Palaeolithic' diet. I'd appreciate references.

    >
    >The 'Paleolithic' diet is probably not a model to follow. The
    >first 90% of the last 150,000 years of our evolutionary history
    >is likely to be more biologically appropriate than the last 10%
    >regarding cancer risks (and also likely, longevity):
    >
    >Urology. 2001 Apr;57(4 Suppl 1):31-8.
    >
    >Similarities of prostate and breast cancer: Evolution, diet, and estrogens.
    >
    >Coffey DS.
    >
    >James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, The Johns Hopkins Hospital,
    >Baltimore, Maryland 21287-2101, USA.
    >
    >Environment determines the risk of both prostate and breast cancer, and
    >this risk can vary >10-fold. In contrast, no risk exists for human
    >seminal vesicle cancer demonstrating tissue specificity. There is also
    >species specificity, because there is no risk for prostate cancer in any
    >other aging mammal except the dog. A study of evolution indicates that
    >the prostate and breast appeared at the same time 65 million years ago
    >with the development of mammals. All male mammals have a prostate;
    >however, the seminal vesicles are variable and are determined by the
    >diet so that species primarily eating meat do not have seminal vesicles.
    >The exception is the human, who has seminal vesicles and consumes meat,
    >although this is a recent dietary change. Human lineage departed from
    >other higher primates 8 million years ago. The closest existing primate
    >to humans is the bonobo (pigmy chimpanzee), which does not eat meat but
    >exists primarily on a high fruit and fresh vegetable diet. Homo sapiens
    >evolved only about 150,000 years ago, and only in the last 10% of that
    >time (10 to 15 thousand years ago) did humans and dogs dramatically
    >alter their diets. This is the time when humans domesticated the dog,
    >bred animals, grew crops, and cooked, processed, and stored meats and
    >vegetables. **All current epidemiologic evidence and suggestions for
    >preventing prostate and breast cancer in humans indicates that we should
    >return to the original diets under which our ancestors evolved. The
    >recent development of the Western-type diet is associated with breast
    >and prostate cancer throughout the world.** It is believed that the
    >exposure to and metabolism of estrogens, and the dietary intake of
    >phytoestrogens, combined with fat intake, obesity, and burned food
    >processing may all be related to hormonal carcinogenesis and oxidative
    >DNA damage. An explanatory model is proposed.
    >
    >PMID: 11295592 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    >
    >some excerpts from the full paper:
    >
    >"There appear to be very similar lifestyle risk factors accompanying
    >both prostate and breast cancer, including a lower risk associated with
    >high intake of fruits, vegetables, fiber, and soy products and,
    >alternatively, a higher risk associated with increased intake of red
    >meat, animal fats, dairy products, and steroid exposure, as well as body
    >mass and birth weight."
    >
    >"Approximately 7 million years ago humans evolved from a common ape
    >ancestor, with our closest relative being the pigmy chimpanzee called
    >the bonobo. Like the other great apes, the bonobo eats primarily fruits
    >and vegetables and no meat."
    >
    >"Other types of chimpanzees occasionally eat meat as opportunist
    >scavengers, sometimes even with very limited hunting. Even in humans,
    >highly effective hunting was not the major source of high meat caloric
    >intake until later in human development. When early hominoids such as
    >"Lucy" came down from the trees 4 million years ago and began to roam
    >the savannas, they picked up the ability to become hunter-gatherers."
    >
    >"This major phase shift in food style occurred only about 10,000 years
    >ago, when humans became farmers and domesticated both plants and
    >animals. This technology quickly evolved into a tighter focusing of
    >human diets from wild fresh vegetables and fruits to an eating pattern
    >toward limited plants that could be domesticated and grown in great
    >quantities and stored, like wheat, rice, barley, corn, potatoes, and
    >other tubers. This resulted in approximately 20 plant types rapidly
    >replacing the high diversity of 3,000 plants and fruits that were
    >earlier eaten fresh as they came into season and were gathered from the
    >wild. With large-scale domestication and breeding of cattle came a high
    >meat intake, and this was combined with storage, curing, drying, and
    >cooking as well as a propensity to use milk and cheese from dairy
    >processing. Cooking, burning, and smoking produce high levels of
    >heterocyclic molecules, many of which make adducts to DNA, and are
    >carcinogens."
    >
    >"Since separating from the great apes and chimpanzees approximately 8
    >million years ago, humans evolved into Homo sapiens sapiens that are
    >very similar to our present form in little as 150,000 years. However, we
    >dramatically changed to a Western-style diet only in the very recent
    >past (ie, 15,000 years)--at a pace much faster than we could
    >biologically evolve (Table V). This Western diet consists of high meat
    >and fat; dairy products; stored, processed, and cooked meats; and low
    >fruit and fiber intake, along with a more sedentary lifestyle."
    >
    >"In summary, we were not biologically selected by the evolution process
    >to eat the way we do today, and the damage is manifested in prostate and
    >breast cancer. Indeed, all of the present suggestions of the National
    >Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society as to how Americans
    >might reduce their chances of getting prostate and breast cancer revolve
    >around adapting dietary changes in our lifestyle back toward the early
    >human diet of more fruits; a variety of fresh vegetables and fiber; less
    >burning, cooking, and processing; diminished intake of dairy products,
    >red meat, and animal fats, as well as decreasing weight and increasing
    >aerobic exercise. That is, we must return to a diet and lifestyle that
    >more closely matches the first 135,000 years before technology modified
    >our lifestyle and diet."
    >
    >TABLE V. Human development and the change of diet
    >Time During Human Development (150,000 years)
    >First 90% (135,000 years) ; Last 10% (15,000 years)
    >Diet: high; low
    >Fruit: high ; low
    >Fiber: high; low
    >Plant diversity: high (3000); low (20)
    >Red meat: low; high
    >Animal fat: low; high
    >Dairy products: low; high
    >Food: fresh/wild ; cooked/preserved
    >Movement: High; Sedentary
    >
    >"Certainly, looking for simple relation will not be sufficient, but
    >delineating the exact mechanisms of cell cycle control and stem cell
    >development in prostate cancer should be helpful in understanding these
    >early preneoplastic lesions and their relation to diet. In the end, we
    >still must explain why approximately 90% of prostate and breast cancers
    >are sporadic and acquired, and why only 10% are directly inherited in a
    >Mendelian manner. The acquired cancers may indicate why this phenomenon
    >is so geographically centered and may be capable of being altered. If
    >these cancers are set in place within the neonatal or developmental
    >periods, as has been proposed by many, then this process will require
    >far more research to unravel the timing of these critical events."
     
  10. Cubit

    Cubit Guest

    I thought the brain has to make its own lipids, due to the constraints of
    the blood brain barrier. If so, dietary omega 3 would only be important for
    other systems.


    "John Sankey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > According to recent genetic research, it seems that the male
    > chromosome of most of the non-African world came out of Africa
    > maybe 50k years ago, then spent several tens of thousands of
    > years in northern latitudes before spreading over the earth.
    >
    > Our brain is made up of many things, but omega-3 lipids are
    > obviously crucial.
    >
    > It's easy to see how people on the shores of Lake Tanganyika got
    > omega-3's - fish. But, where did they get them on the steppes of
    > northern Europe/Asia? I'm wondering if maybe that's why it took
    > so long for northern Eurasians to conquer the planet - that they
    > had to find a much more efficient way of producing or conserving
    > those essential brain lipids than was needed in Africa.
    >
    > So, here's the question: where do modern people who rely totally
    > upon northern non-fish food sources get their birthright of
    > omega-3's for their brains? Laplanders and a few northern
    > Siberian tribes are about all that's left of the northern
    > 'Palaeolithic' diet. I'd appreciate references.
    >
     
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