Difference between TA Zephr and Shimano Deore XT Cranksets

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Wayne T, Feb 19, 2003.

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  1. Wayne T

    Wayne T Guest

    I am looking for a good crankset for my and my wife's touring bikes. At first I was looking at TA
    Zephr because it gives the greatest flexibility of gear sizes but is quite expensive. Also, I was
    told that the Dura Ace low is only a 24. I want a 22. Not sure what the low for the Ultegra crank
    is. I assume 24 as well. However, I just found a 22/33/44T Shimano Deore XT Crankset for $140
    weighing in at 647g. or 1.4 lbs. Since TA is a lot more expensive, what exactly am I getting for
    this much higher price? Is it much stiffer as well as lighter? Also, will the XT work on a touring
    bike with a 9 speed cassette? I assume that it will. Also, will the XT work with my 22 year old Phil
    Wood bottom bracket?
     
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  2. Melon

    Melon Guest

    > I am looking for a good crankset for my and my wife's touring bikes. At first I was looking at TA
    > Zephr because it gives the greatest flexibility
    of
    > gear sizes but is quite expensive. Also, I was told that the Dura Ace low is only a 24. I want a
    > 22. Not sure what the low for the Ultegra crank
    is.
    > I assume 24 as well. However, I just found a 22/33/44T Shimano Deore XT Crankset for $140 weighing
    > in at 647g. or 1.4 lbs.

    You should be able to get XT crankset for just under 100$ (on-line stores).

    > Since TA is a lot more expensive, what exactly am I getting for this much
    higher price? Is it much
    > stiffer as well as lighter?

    Shimano's hollowtech is one of the stiffests designs. There shuldn't be much difference in
    the weight.

    > Also, will the XT work on a touring bike with a 9 speed cassette?

    It's a front derailleur issue. As long as it will be able to shift the chain over XT's chainrings
    everything should be OK.

    > Also, will the XT work with my 22 year old Phil Wood bottom bracket?

    The latest XT models (751, 752) require splined (octalink V2) bottom bracket (es-70, es-50 or
    similar) introduced in 2000. There are still square spindle type XT cranksets on the market (much
    harder to find than new ones) tha should work with your current BB. If you think about bottom
    bracket change, make sure that its threads will fit your frame.

    --
    Melon - grandmaster of sweat, pain and suffering himself.
     
  3. Wayne T wrote:
    > I am looking for a good crankset for my and my wife's touring bikes. At first I was looking at TA
    > Zephr because it gives the greatest flexibility of gear sizes but is quite expensive. Also, I was
    > told that the Dura Ace low is only a 24.

    If you're speaking of the Dura-Ace triple crank, the low chainring is 30, take it or leave it. It
    uses a unique holt pattern (92 mm BCD) and there is no other size chainring made to fit.

    > I want a 22. Not sure what the low for the Ultegra crank is. I assume 24 as well.

    Yes, it is.

    > However, I just found a 22/33/44T Shimano Deore XT Crankset for $140 weighing in at 647g. or 1.4
    > lbs. Since TA is a lot more expensive, what exactly am I getting for this much higher price?

    The ability to use larger chainrings than are available for the XT.

    > Is it much stiffer as well as lighter?

    I doubt it.

    > Also, will the XT work on a touring bike with a 9 speed cassette? I assume that it will.

    Sure, cranks don't care how many sprockets you have in back, contrary to common misconception.

    > Also, will the XT work with my 22 year old Phil Wood bottom bracket?

    No.

    Sheldon "Answers" Brown +---------------------------------------------------------+
    | It is good to learn from your mistakes; | It is better to learn from the mistakes of others. |
    +---------------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton,
    Massachusetts Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts
    shipped Worldwide http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  4. Bluto

    Bluto Guest

    "Wayne T" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I am looking for a good crankset for my and my wife's touring bikes. At first I was looking at TA
    > Zephr because it gives the greatest flexibility of gear sizes but is quite expensive. Also, I was
    > told that the Dura Ace low is only a 24. I want a 22.

    For versatility in chainring sizes, you want 110mm BCD rings for the middle and outer positions.
    Usually this means a 110/74 cranks, which means a minimum 24t small ring. That's what I would
    strongly recommend unless there's some reason you _must_ use a granny ring smaller than 24t.

    The TA Zephyr is the only crank I know that has 110mm and 56/58mm BCD patterns together on the same
    arm. Plenty of MTB cranks use 94/58 BCDs, but using one of those will put a serious limit on what
    ring sizes you can get. Likewise any 4-arm crank, like the Shimano XT unit you mention.

    What are you going to get by using a 22t ring that you would not by using a 24t and a step larger in
    the rear cluster?

    > However, I just found a 22/33/44T Shimano Deore XT Crankset for $140 weighing in at 647g. or 1.4
    > lbs. Since TA is a lot more expensive, what exactly am I getting for this much higher price? Is it
    > much stiffer as well as lighter?

    Rivendell on TA Zephyr: "It weighs about 700g with rings (175 mm)."

    With cranks, lighter almost always means less stiff. The difference in stiffness between different
    lightweight aluminum cranks is negligible, whichever you choose. If most riders preferred stiffness
    at the cranks, they would never have accepted sealed cartridge BBs, which rob much more stiffness
    than barely-hollowtech cranks could ever restore.

    The only stiff and lightweight crank available is the Bullseye 2-pc CrMo crank, which is available
    with various chainring spiders including 110/74mm, which comes in lengths from 152mm to 222mm, and
    which weighs equal to or less than either of the cranks you've mentioned once you count the BB.
    Nothing else in the weight range even comes close to that degree of stiffness. But if you are like
    most cycling enthusiasts, you really don't care how stiff your crank
    is.

    Chalo Colina
     
  5. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Bluto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > "Wayne T" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I am looking for a good crankset for my and my wife's
    touring bikes. At
    > > first I was looking at TA Zephr because it gives the
    greatest flexibility of
    > > gear sizes but is quite expensive. Also, I was told
    that the Dura Ace low
    > > is only a 24. I want a 22.
    >
    > For versatility in chainring sizes, you want 110mm BCD
    rings for the
    > middle and outer positions. Usually this means a 110/74
    cranks, which
    > means a minimum 24t small ring. That's what I would
    strongly
    > recommend unless there's some reason you _must_ use a
    granny ring
    > smaller than 24t.
    >
    > The TA Zephyr is the only crank I know that has 110mm and
    56/58mm BCD
    > patterns together on the same arm. Plenty of MTB cranks
    use 94/58
    > BCDs, but using one of those will put a serious limit on
    what ring
    > sizes you can get. Likewise any 4-arm crank, like the
    Shimano XT unit
    > you mention.

    Another possible solution is a110/74 crank with an Avid Microdapter, which converts the inner bolt
    circle to 58 or 56, so you can use a 22T inner ring. They're probably not made anymore, but a
    resourceful person should be able to find one.

    However, using such a small inner ring with normal road-sized outer would probably exceed the limits
    of your derailers. I've used a 22T inner with a 46T outer on a mountain bike with no problems, but I
    think that's about the limit -- and that was with old Deore DX gear, which was particularly
    flexible. Newer stuff doesn't do as well with unconventional setups.

    > What are you going to get by using a 22t ring that you
    would not by
    > using a 24t and a step larger in the rear cluster?

    That *is* a good question...

    > > However, I just found a 22/33/44T Shimano Deore XT Crankset for $140 weighing in at 647g. or
    > > 1.4 lbs.
    Since TA is a lot more
    > > expensive, what exactly am I getting for this much
    higher price? Is it much
    > > stiffer as well as lighter?
    >
    > Rivendell on TA Zephyr: "It weighs about 700g with rings
    (175 mm)."
    >
    > With cranks, lighter almost always means less stiff. The
    difference
    > in stiffness between different lightweight aluminum cranks
    is
    > negligible, whichever you choose. If most riders
    preferred stiffness
    > at the cranks, they would never have accepted sealed
    cartridge BBs,
    > which rob much more stiffness than barely-hollowtech
    cranks could ever
    > restore.

    I don't think stiffness is an issue at all, unless you're really big. Even then, just because you
    can feel it doesn't mean it matters. Besides, it's probably the frame and BB axle you feel flexing,
    not the crank. The problem with aluminum cranks is that if you're big and strong and can feel them
    flexing, you might be at risk of breaking them. Aluminum doesn't like to be flexed.

    If you've ever seen a cross section of a Hollowtech crank, you'd think it was a joke. The hollow
    part is about as big as a grain of rice. I'm sure it doesn't help anything, but it probably doesn't
    hurt either, except make the cranks more expensive to make. But that's Shimano's problem, not yours,
    because an XT crank would be priced at $150 whether it were Hollowtech or diamond studded pewter.

    That said, the new XT crank might be fine -- but a 110/74 crank will still give you the best
    selection of chainrings. I'd be more inclined to use an older Shimano XT/DX/RSX, Suntour XC Pro, or
    Ritchey crank with said bolt circle, and maybe the Microdaptor if you really want that 22. You
    should be able to find one of these cranks pretty cheap, and it might even work with your old BB.

    The TA is neato, but spending over $200 on a crank is completely insane, at least to me. That's
    well off the value chart, where bikes start having more in common with things like Rolex watches
    and Bentleys.

    Matt O.
     
  6. Wayne T wrote:
    >
    > I am looking for a good crankset for my and my wife's touring bikes. At first I was looking at TA
    > Zephr because it gives the greatest flexibility of gear sizes but is quite expensive. Also, I was
    > told that the Dura Ace low is only a 24. I want a 22. Not sure what the low for the Ultegra crank
    > is. I assume 24 as well. However, I just found a 22/33/44T Shimano Deore XT Crankset for $140
    > weighing in at 647g. or 1.4 lbs. Since TA is a lot more expensive, what exactly am I getting for
    > this much higher price? Is it much stiffer as well as lighter? Also, will the XT work on a touring
    > bike with a 9 speed cassette? I assume that it will. Also, will the XT work with my 22 year old
    > Phil Wood bottom bracket?

    Don't buy a DA crankset. It is totally bastard for the reasons given by
    Mr. S. Brown. 110/74 makes the most sense. Rings are still plentiful and are likely to stay that way
    since there is a huge installed base of these cranks.

    I would buy the Sugino if I wanted to save a few bucks, and the Ritchey (made by Sugino) if I wanted
    top-of-the-line. The Sugino is everything you are likely to need.

    http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/webalog/cranks_bbs_c-rings/12067.html (165, 170, 175 mm)

    http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/webalog/cranks_bbs_c-rings/12226.html (one size only: 175 mm)

    Or

    Sugino XD500 full-sized Triple Crank Sets 46-36-26 $89.95 @
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/drive.html#cranks

    You might be able to find an Avid Microadaptor if you really think sub-24t rings are necessary, but
    a 24x34 is pretty low.
     
  7. Wayne T

    Wayne T Guest

    "Bluto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Wayne T" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I am looking for a good crankset for my and my wife's touring bikes. At first I was looking at
    > > TA Zephr because it gives the greatest
    flexibility of
    > > gear sizes but is quite expensive. Also, I was told that the Dura Ace
    low
    > > is only a 24. I want a 22.
    >
    > For versatility in chainring sizes, you want 110mm BCD rings for the middle and outer positions.
    > Usually this means a 110/74 cranks, which means a minimum 24t small ring. That's what I would
    > strongly recommend unless there's some reason you _must_ use a granny ring smaller than 24t.
    >
    > The TA Zephyr is the only crank I know that has 110mm and 56/58mm BCD patterns together on the
    > same arm. Plenty of MTB cranks use 94/58 BCDs, but using one of those will put a serious limit on
    > what ring sizes you can get. Likewise any 4-arm crank, like the Shimano XT unit you mention.

    Since the 22/32/44 XT is pretty much the gearing that I would want, why would I have to go to the TA
    Zephyr? Or am I misunderstanding what you are saying? Can the XT be used with a road bike? My
    deraillers are MTN Bike.
    >
    > What are you going to get by using a 22t ring that you would not by using a 24t and a step larger
    > in the rear cluster?

    The rear cassette I am interested in is from 12-34. True, I would probably not use that low of 17.5
    all that often on club rides but it may come in handy on a heavy tour. And since I am 56, I'm not
    quite as strong as I used to be. Also, my wife would be getting the same setup and she is not as
    strong as I. I could probably live with a 24.
    >
    > > However, I just found a 22/33/44T Shimano Deore XT Crankset for $140 weighing in at 647g. or 1.4
    > > lbs. Since TA is a lot
    more
    > > expensive, what exactly am I getting for this much higher price? Is it
    much
    > > stiffer as well as lighter?
    >
    > Rivendell on TA Zephyr: "It weighs about 700g with rings (175 mm)."
    >
    > With cranks, lighter almost always means less stiff. The difference in stiffness between different
    > lightweight aluminum cranks is negligible, whichever you choose. If most riders preferred
    > stiffness at the cranks, they would never have accepted sealed cartridge BBs, which rob much more
    > stiffness than barely-hollowtech cranks could ever restore.
    >
    > The only stiff and lightweight crank available is the Bullseye 2-pc CrMo crank, which is available
    > with various chainring spiders including 110/74mm, which comes in lengths from 152mm to 222mm, and
    > which weighs equal to or less than either of the cranks you've mentioned once you count the BB.
    > Nothing else in the weight range even comes close to that degree of stiffness. But if you are like
    > most cycling enthusiasts, you really don't care how stiff your crank
    > is.
    >
    > Chalo Colina
     
  8. Wayne T

    Wayne T Guest

    "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Bluto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > "Wayne T" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > I am looking for a good crankset for my and my wife's
    > touring bikes. At
    > > > first I was looking at TA Zephr because it gives the
    > greatest flexibility of
    > > > gear sizes but is quite expensive. Also, I was told
    > that the Dura Ace low
    > > > is only a 24. I want a 22.
    > >
    > > For versatility in chainring sizes, you want 110mm BCD
    > rings for the
    > > middle and outer positions. Usually this means a 110/74
    > cranks, which
    > > means a minimum 24t small ring. That's what I would
    > strongly
    > > recommend unless there's some reason you _must_ use a
    > granny ring
    > > smaller than 24t.
    > >
    > > The TA Zephyr is the only crank I know that has 110mm and
    > 56/58mm BCD
    > > patterns together on the same arm. Plenty of MTB cranks
    > use 94/58
    > > BCDs, but using one of those will put a serious limit on
    > what ring
    > > sizes you can get. Likewise any 4-arm crank, like the
    > Shimano XT unit
    > > you mention.
    >
    > Another possible solution is a110/74 crank with an Avid Microdapter, which converts the inner bolt
    > circle to 58 or 56, so you can use a 22T inner ring. They're probably not made anymore, but a
    > resourceful person should be able to find one.
    >
    > However, using such a small inner ring with normal road-sized outer would probably exceed the
    > limits of your derailers. I've used a 22T inner with a 46T outer on a mountain bike with no
    > problems, but I think that's about the limit -- and that was with old Deore DX gear, which was
    > particularly flexible. Newer stuff doesn't do as well with unconventional setups.
    >
    > > What are you going to get by using a 22t ring that you
    > would not by
    > > using a 24t and a step larger in the rear cluster?
    >
    > That *is* a good question...
    >
    > > > However, I just found a 22/33/44T Shimano Deore XT Crankset for $140 weighing in at 647g. or
    > > > 1.4 lbs.
    > Since TA is a lot more
    > > > expensive, what exactly am I getting for this much
    > higher price? Is it much
    > > > stiffer as well as lighter?
    > >
    > > Rivendell on TA Zephyr: "It weighs about 700g with rings
    > (175 mm)."
    > >
    > > With cranks, lighter almost always means less stiff. The
    > difference
    > > in stiffness between different lightweight aluminum cranks
    > is
    > > negligible, whichever you choose. If most riders
    > preferred stiffness
    > > at the cranks, they would never have accepted sealed
    > cartridge BBs,
    > > which rob much more stiffness than barely-hollowtech
    > cranks could ever
    > > restore.
    >
    > I don't think stiffness is an issue at all, unless you're really big. Even then, just because you
    > can feel it doesn't mean it matters. Besides, it's probably the frame and BB axle you feel
    > flexing, not the crank. The problem with aluminum cranks is that if you're big and strong and can
    > feel them flexing, you might be at risk of breaking them. Aluminum doesn't like to be flexed.
    >
    > If you've ever seen a cross section of a Hollowtech crank, you'd think it was a joke. The hollow
    > part is about as big as a grain of rice. I'm sure it doesn't help anything, but it probably
    > doesn't hurt either, except make the cranks more expensive to make. But that's Shimano's problem,
    > not yours, because an XT crank would be priced at $150 whether it were Hollowtech or diamond
    > studded pewter.
    >
    > That said, the new XT crank might be fine -- but a 110/74 crank will still give you the best
    > selection of chainrings. I'd be more inclined to use an older Shimano XT/DX/RSX, Suntour XC Pro,
    > or Ritchey crank with said bolt circle, and maybe the Microdaptor if you really want that 22. You
    > should be able to find one of these cranks pretty cheap, and it might even work with your old BB.
    >
    > The TA is neato, but spending over $200 on a crank is completely insane, at least to me. That's
    > well off the value chart, where bikes start having more in common with things like Rolex watches
    > and Bentleys.

    Yeah, I'm with you. If I am happy with a 22/32/44 set up on an XT, would this work on my road bike,
    or is there a problem with using a MTN Bike crank set on a road bike? BTW, I take it that a Campy
    racing triple does not have a 22 granny gear.
    >
    > Matt O.
    >
    >
     
  9. Wayne T

    Wayne T Guest

    "The Pomeranian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Wayne T wrote:
    > >
    > > I am looking for a good crankset for my and my wife's touring bikes. At first I was looking at
    > > TA Zephr because it gives the greatest
    flexibility of
    > > gear sizes but is quite expensive. Also, I was told that the Dura Ace
    low
    > > is only a 24. I want a 22. Not sure what the low for the Ultegra crank
    is.
    > > I assume 24 as well. However, I just found a 22/33/44T Shimano Deore XT Crankset for $140
    > > weighing in at 647g. or 1.4 lbs. Since TA is a lot
    more
    > > expensive, what exactly am I getting for this much higher price? Is it
    much
    > > stiffer as well as lighter? Also, will the XT work on a touring bike
    with a
    > > 9 speed cassette? I assume that it will. Also, will the XT work with
    my 22
    > > year old Phil Wood bottom bracket?
    >
    > Don't buy a DA crankset. It is totally bastard for the reasons given by
    > Mr. S. Brown. 110/74 makes the most sense. Rings are still plentiful and are likely to stay that
    > way since there is a huge installed base of these cranks.
    >
    > I would buy the Sugino if I wanted to save a few bucks, and the Ritchey (made by Sugino) if I
    > wanted top-of-the-line. The Sugino is everything you are likely to need.

    Thank you. Worth looking into.
    >
    > http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/webalog/cranks_bbs_c-rings/12067.html (165, 170, 175 mm)
    >
    > http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/webalog/cranks_bbs_c-rings/12226.html (one size only: 175 mm)
    >
    > Or
    >
    > Sugino XD500 full-sized Triple Crank Sets 46-36-26 $89.95 @
    > http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/drive.html#cranks
    >
    > You might be able to find an Avid Microadaptor if you really think sub-24t rings are necessary,
    > but a 24x34 is pretty low.
     
  10. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Wayne T" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Yeah, I'm with you. If I am happy with a 22/32/44 set up
    on an XT, would
    > this work on my road bike, or is there a problem with
    using a MTN Bike
    > crank set on a road bike?

    As long as it gives you the gearing you need and your derailers can handle it, then no problem.

    > BTW, I take it that a Campy racing triple does not have a 22 granny gear.

    I think the smallest ring a Campy triple takes is a 28 or a
    30.

    Matt O.
     
  11. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On Fri, 21 Feb 2003 04:15:04 GMT, "Wayne T" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Yeah, I'm with you. If I am happy with a 22/32/44 set up on an XT, would this work on my road bike,
    >or is there a problem with using a MTN Bike crank set on a road bike? BTW, I take it that a Campy
    >racing triple does not have a 22 granny gear.
    >>
    The MTB crankset would work as long as the chainline and frame design were not such that the bottom
    of the front derailleur does not contact the chainstay.

    The inner ring on Campy triple is a 74 bolt pattern and it would hold a 24t. The other rings are 135
    bolt and I don't think you can find rings smaller than 50/39. The chain would likely drag on the
    bottom of the front derailleur cage if a 24 were mounted with a 50t big ring in a gear like 24/24
    when the big ring is 32. The Ergo shifters and 3x10 long cage rear derailleurs would have no problem
    with the MTB front derailleur and the gear range.
     
  12. Paul Kopit <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The inner ring on Campy triple is a 74 bolt pattern and it would hold a 24t. The other rings are
    > 135 bolt and I don't think you can find rings smaller than 50/39.

    That's true for the inner ring, but not for the outer ring. I have a 48-tooth TA ring mounted on a
    current Campagnolo double crank, and I believe TA also makes 46 and 47-tooth outer rings.

    -as
     
  13. Trent Piepho

    Trent Piepho Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Wayne T
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >"Bluto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >
    >Since the 22/32/44 XT is pretty much the gearing that I would want, why would I have to go to the
    >TA Zephyr? Or am I misunderstanding what you are

    The Zephyr would give you more choice of different chainrings than the XT, especially if you wanted
    larger ones. But if all you want is 22/32/44, then it's not going to give you anything.

    >saying? Can the XT be used with a road bike? My deraillers are MTN Bike.

    It can, but you will need to buy the correct BB for it. The problem with shimano MTB front
    deraillers on a road bike is that they are incompatible with STI shifters. If you don't use a STI
    shifter for the front, then no problem.
     
  14. Wayne T

    Wayne T Guest

    "Trent Piepho" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Wayne T
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >"Bluto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > >Since the 22/32/44 XT is pretty much the gearing that I would want, why would I have to go to the
    > >TA Zephyr? Or am I misunderstanding what you
    are
    >
    > The Zephyr would give you more choice of different chainrings than the XT, especially if you
    > wanted larger ones. But if all you want is 22/32/44,
    then
    > it's not going to give you anything.
    >
    > >saying? Can the XT be used with a road bike? My deraillers are MTN
    Bike.
    >
    > It can, but you will need to buy the correct BB for it. The problem with shimano MTB front
    > deraillers on a road bike is that they are incompatible
    with
    > STI shifters. If you don't use a STI shifter for the front, then no
    problem.

    My shifters are bar ends. So looks like the XT may be a possibility. Thanks.
     
  15. Mark Boyd

    Mark Boyd Guest

    On Thu, 20 Feb 2003, Matt O'Toole wrote:

    > Another possible solution is a110/74 crank with an Avid Microdapter, which converts the inner bolt
    > circle to 58 or 56, so you can use a 22T inner ring. They're probably not made anymore, but a
    > resourceful person should be able to find one.
    >
    > However, using such a small inner ring with normal road-sized outer would probably exceed the
    > limits of your derailers. I've used a 22T inner with a 46T outer on a mountain bike with no
    > problems, but I think that's about the limit -- and that was with old Deore DX gear, which was
    > particularly flexible. Newer stuff doesn't do as well with unconventional setups.

    I use a 20 inner, 33 middle, and 46 outer with no problems. I just replaced my old '95 XTR front
    derailleur - it was damaged - with a new LX derailleur. I went LX because it is designed for a 46
    big ring while XT is designed for 42. The derailleur works fine and would handle a granny even
    smaller than 20. I use an old adapter that lets me go down to 18 with freewheel cogs.

    > > What are you going to get by using a 22t ring that you would not by using a 24t and a step
    > > larger in the rear cluster?
    >
    > That *is* a good question...

    Hmm, But that isn't true when you use a 20. My granny is 20/32 and you can't get that with a 24. You
    can use a 20 with a 56 or 58 bolt circle and get about 2 gears lower than you can with a 24 on a 74
    bolt circle.

    Mark <http://www.cs.unca.edu/~boyd/bicycling.html
     
  16. Wayne T wrote:
    >
    > "Trent Piepho" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > In article <[email protected]>, Wayne T
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > >"Bluto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > >news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > >Since the 22/32/44 XT is pretty much the gearing that I would want, why would I have to go to
    > > >the TA Zephyr? Or am I misunderstanding what you
    > are
    > >
    > > The Zephyr would give you more choice of different chainrings than the XT, especially if you
    > > wanted larger ones. But if all you want is 22/32/44,
    > then
    > > it's not going to give you anything.
    > >
    > > >saying? Can the XT be used with a road bike? My deraillers are MTN
    > Bike.
    > >
    > > It can, but you will need to buy the correct BB for it. The problem with shimano MTB front
    > > deraillers on a road bike is that they are incompatible
    > with
    > > STI shifters. If you don't use a STI shifter for the front, then no
    > problem.
    >
    > My shifters are bar ends. So looks like the XT may be a possibility.

    Then you can get a good test w/o spending much money with the following crank:

    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=81&subcategory=1031&brand=&sku=4866&storetype=&estoreid=

    You can't beat $25 for a triple crank of reasonable quality (buy a $15 BB too). Still, I would lean
    to the Sugino and try to find a microadaptor if you really think you need a 20 or 22t granny. You
    can put a 34t middle on a 110 circle and even a 33t if you are willing to do a little dremeling.
    Again, the 5-arm 110/74 is a ubiquitous crank so a lot of availability is implied for rings.

    Check out: http://members.safepages.com/mountainbike/jemez/quads.html

    "All Mountain Tamer adapters work with cranks having standard 43.4mm hole spacing. (74mm)"
     
  17. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > "Wayne T" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    -snip-
    > > BTW, I take it that a Campy racing triple does not have a 22 granny gear.

    "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I think the smallest ring a Campy triple takes is a 28 or a
    > 30.

    74mm rings are made down to 24t, which is where the bolts go through. There are/were Campagnolo
    Centaur*/Euclid rings in 24t. Several manufacturers make 74mm rings in various materials and
    finishes to fit Campagnolo and all the other 74mm cranks.

    *The "Centaur Classic" MTB line, not the current Centaur (nee Daytona) road equipment. Dumb of them
    to reuse that name IMHO.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  18. Wayne T

    Wayne T Guest

    "The Pomeranian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Wayne T wrote:
    > >
    > > "Trent Piepho" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > In article <[email protected]>, Wayne T
    > > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > >"Bluto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > >news:[email protected]...
    > > > >
    > > > >Since the 22/32/44 XT is pretty much the gearing that I would want,
    why
    > > > >would I have to go to the TA Zephyr? Or am I misunderstanding what
    you
    > > are
    > > >
    > > > The Zephyr would give you more choice of different chainrings than the
    XT,
    > > > especially if you wanted larger ones. But if all you want is
    22/32/44,
    > > then
    > > > it's not going to give you anything.
    > > >
    > > > >saying? Can the XT be used with a road bike? My deraillers are MTN
    > > Bike.
    > > >
    > > > It can, but you will need to buy the correct BB for it. The problem
    with
    > > > shimano MTB front deraillers on a road bike is that they are
    incompatible
    > > with
    > > > STI shifters. If you don't use a STI shifter for the front, then no
    > > problem.
    > >
    > > My shifters are bar ends. So looks like the XT may be a possibility.
    >
    >
    > Then you can get a good test w/o spending much money with the following crank:
    >
    >
    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=81&subcategory=1031&brand=&sku=4
    866&storetype=&estoreid=
    >
    > You can't beat $25 for a triple crank of reasonable quality (buy a $15 BB too). Still, I would
    > lean to the Sugino and try to find a microadaptor if you really think you need a 20 or 22t
    > granny. You can put a 34t middle on a 110 circle and even a 33t if you are willing to do a
    > little dremeling. Again, the 5-arm 110/74 is a ubiquitous crank so a lot of availability is
    > implied for rings.

    Wow, $25 is really cheap. Might be because it is an 8 speed which is becoming less and less
    available.
    >
    >
    > Check out: http://members.safepages.com/mountainbike/jemez/quads.html
    >
    > "All Mountain Tamer adapters work with cranks having standard 43.4mm hole spacing. (74mm)"

    I will have to present this to my builder. Thanks.
     
  19. On Thu, 20 Feb 2003 23:15:04 -0500, Wayne T wrote:

    > Yeah, I'm with you. If I am happy with a 22/32/44 set up on an XT, would this work on my road
    > bike, or is there a problem with using a MTN Bike crank set on a road bike? BTW, I take it that a
    > Campy racing triple does not have a 22 granny gear.

    I have a road bike that has an XT crank with 20/32/44, which I use with a 12-25 8-speed cassette. It
    works fine. (Of course, I'm using it with Deore XT mechs and bar end shifters.)
     
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