Different Stem Rise Angles: Effects

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by SUPER RIDER, Jul 27, 2007.

  1. SUPER RIDER

    SUPER RIDER New Member

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    I have a Cannondale CAAD8 54cm Road Bike that I purchased not long ago, and I have some questions about stem angle changes and effects.

    I am just a tad below 5' 10", and I have cycling inseam of 34inches (86.36cm), which means my legs are quite long for my height.

    I tried the CAAD8 in size 56cm, but the top tube was just too long, and I was really not keen about reducing the stem length on the 56cm. The size 54cm toptube length was perfect, but I am showing about 7inches of seatpost. The real issue though is that I have about 31/4inches (three and a quarter) of saddle to handlebar drop. I am quite flexible, and I have not had any pain or issue(s) with the drop, but it seems like what one would see on a professional racer's bike. And I am really really far from a pro racer.

    What I am thinking about is this:

    The current stock stem is 100mm with a 6degree rise.

    I am looking to find a 100mm, 10 or 12 degrees of rise stem to put on the bike, so as to help decrease the saddle to handlebar drop a little bit.

    Is this approach reasonable? ;

    And if it is, about how many inches can I hope to get in reducing my saddle top to handlebar top drop from its current "three and a quarter inches"?

    Or, should I just leave "well enough alone"?

    Thanks for all responses.

    Regards,

    Super
     
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  2. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    If that 3 1/4 inches is measured from the top of the saddle, then leave it ... unless your neck is bothering you, in which case you want a hi-rise/MTB handlebar stem to move the handlebars up a couple of inches.

    BTW. 3.25" can't be as large differential as you think since the top of my handlebars are closer to 4" below the top of my saddle. And, the people who race generally have their bars (much) lower than that.
     
  3. kleng

    kleng New Member

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    Have you tried flipping the stem over or adding more headstem spacers
     
  4. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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  5. SUPER RIDER

    SUPER RIDER New Member

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    Okay. Yes, the 3.25" is measured from the top of the saddle to the top of the handlebar.

    My neck is not bothering me at all, however I am 47years old, and I am thinking of the future, when I won't be quite as flexible as I am now. Also, it is quite possible that I'll like to buy a carbon-framed bike in the not-so-distant future, and it sure will be nice to have my fit dialed-in perfectly on the current bike before shelling out big dough on a carbon bike, that would probably be my primary ride well into my old age .

    I do think I'll take your advice though, and just leave things as they are.

    Thanks.

    Super
     
  6. SUPER RIDER

    SUPER RIDER New Member

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    Thanks. A flip at this point would only take me to negative rise i.e. drop me downwards. More aero though:)

    I guess spacers could be an option. I am not sure that I'll really like the way that'll look.

    Thanks.
     
  7. SUPER RIDER

    SUPER RIDER New Member

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    Thanks George. My options at this point are either to change stem or use the stem riser. I would prefer to change stems, if I could, hence my original question about a 100mm, 10 or 12 degree rise stem.

    Super.
     
  8. MarkInNC

    MarkInNC New Member

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    I had position issues on my mountain bike that I ride on the road. I just could not get comfortable and had to get off the bike every 4=5 miles to walk out kinks and stiffness. I put an adjustable stem on my bike and adjusted it so that the bars came up about two inches and back about an inch and a half. I know I have traded some additional drag for comfort, but, I am ridding now and feel good at the end of a ride now.


    Mark
     
  9. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    Best to buy some cheap stems and experiment yourself.

    Below is an example of a flat bar conversion on a Felt. The aim is to have the bars and seat level as a starting point. A 100mm Stem Riser is used here on a "road" frameset.
     
  10. pistole

    pistole New Member

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    - with roadbikes/drop bars , your seat will always be much taller than the top of the bars. Mine is close to 4 inches. Nothing wrong with that , as your back/body/shoulders will adapt to the drop. Nothing to do with how a pro's bike looks like.

    - if you experience discomfort with the reach , leave the seat's fore-aft position alone , and either , change to a shorter stem and/or tip up the bar (ie , get the hoods up higher).

    - I went from a 100mm stem to a 70mm stem and it made a real world of a difference to riding comfort.

    - and keep the stem level. Riser stems are really really ugly.

    cheers.
    .
     
  11. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    No. Not true. The bars, no matter the bike, need to be where ever the rider needs them for best fit.

    Uh-huh. Whatever.
     
  12. SUPER RIDER

    SUPER RIDER New Member

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    I still think my best option is to buy a cheap 100mm, 10 or 12 degree rise stem, and find out if that decreases my saddletop-handlebar differential substantially from its present 3.25inches.

    Note that I am not changing the stem length from the present 100mm, just upping the angle to (10 or 12)^ from 7^.

    Thanks.
     
  13. BarryB1124

    BarryB1124 New Member

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    I am far from a pro myself. But everyone will agree that the bottom line is comfort. It took some seat angle and height adjustments for me to get my back, neck and knees comfortable on my bike. But I have that now and my bike rides super. I think if you are comfortable the safest bet is to leave it alone. To the best of my knowledge people will ride at a variety of height differentials between seats and handlebars. If that height works for you then I would not doubt that it should remain as is.
     
  14. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    Remember how good :cool: you :cool: look the day you run up someones arse 'cause you have your head so low you can't see where you are going. But my, you do look good! :cool:
     
  15. Camilo

    Camilo New Member

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    When you experiment with the higher angle stem, remember, it will reduce the effective reach a little. You might try a 110 with a steeper angle.

    Bike shops have "fitting stems" which are adjustable in length and angle. I did that and definitely found a sweet spot - then I bought the stem.

    For your future vision of a carbon bike. .... You know that the CAAD8 frame is pretty much a full-on racing frame. I have a CAAD7 and love it, but I do know that it is not intended to be a "relaxed" frame, and would take some tinkering to get the handlebars up even with the seat. It really is designed for a fairly significant drop from seat to bars. Other bikes are designed for less of a drop.

    At 54, I'm thinking of investing in a differnt sort of frame next time. A friend has a bike with a MUCH longer head tube, which makes it very easy to get the handlebars up there. His happens to be a Raleigh Cadent (?), but I think most major lines now have these sort of bikes - high quality road bikes, but with relaxed geometry for a less racy position. I believe you can find a top of the line carbon framed bike with more suitable geometry (in that particular regard).
     
  16. pistole

    pistole New Member

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    - learn to post in a more civilised manner.

    - the OP had no problem with his drop.

    - but still wants a riser , to , apparently , not have his bike look like a pro's bike

    - I was pointing out that the drop is very normal for a properly setup roadbike.

    really.
    .
     
  17. Camilo

    Camilo New Member

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    But it's not true. There are road bikes that are designed so that when the correct frame size is selected (standover, reach, etc), a "proper setup" can be done with the handlebars adjusted to be level with, even higher than, the seat without unusual extensions or risers.

    "Racing" road bikes - maybe not. But there are indeed road bikes with which this can be done.

    I do agree that his particular frame - the CAAD8 - probably can't accomplish this without a steep angled stem and/or a steer tube extension.
     
  18. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    I was perfectly civilised. Maybe you shouldn't be so sensitive.

    Thanks for the tuition though. I'll give it all the worth it's due.
    :rolleyes:
     
  19. caferacerwanabe

    caferacerwanabe New Member

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    http://www.nvocomponents.com/index.html

    Not easy to get but from what I have seen these are a great tool for fine tuning the bike . They are not designed to increase the stack height but makes adjustment on the fly much easier plus simpler disassembling of bars/stem if you are flying with the bike alot , eliminates those pesky spacer squeaks & spreads the load better on a carbon steerer .NB you can cut the sleeve to a lower height to just have for example 1cm range or use the the full range if your fork steerer supports it.
    [​IMG]
     
  20. SUPER RIDER

    SUPER RIDER New Member

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    As I mentioned in my original post, I am actually not having any physical issue(s) with the way the bike is currently set up. I am only "mildly" concerned with the 3.25inches saddle-top to handlebar-top differential. It would be nice to have a slightly lower differential, hence my looking for a 10^ or 12^ stem.

    I am actually not aiming for my handlebar being level with my saddle-top, only looking for a drop of maybe 2inches or so, as opposed to my current 3.25inches.

    I'll try and find a 110mm (10 or 12)^ stem, and I have a feeling this'll help with dropping my differential a little bit.

    Thanks for pointing out that I should be looking for a 110mm, as opposed to the 100mm length I was fixated on.

    Regards,
     
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