Different Stem Rise Angles: Effects

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by SUPER RIDER, Jul 27, 2007.

  1. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    You probably could be riding a 55cm/56cm (c-t, ~55cm c-c) COLNAGO frame (or, equivalent ... I have a 53cm [c-c, 54cm c-t] OLMO whose top tube is ~55cm) with ~55cm top tube rather than a pseudo-compact frame that has limited sizing -- THAT would be the easiest way to lessen the differential to under 3 inches.

    If you opted for 180mm cranks (it could be suggested that your legs are probably comparable to someone who is closer to 6' tall), you would lessen the differential by more than the 5mm if you are currently using 175mm cranks -- figure on your saddle being a half inch lower after make the fore/aft adjustment -- it might take you 15 minutes or 15 months to get your saddle's orientation corrected depending on how things are currently set up, so changing crank lengths isn't something to be done without some consideration as to the pitfalls. Of course, you may ultimately choose NOT to change the fore/aft positioning of your saddle ... but, I would recommend you try pushing the saddle BACK & slightly lower before hand as it may be enough to satisfy your current-and-future concerns.

    BTW. I'm 5'9" ... my "regular" bike is a 52cm (c-c) with a 54cm top tube & 120mm stem. The Olmo has a shorter 110mm stem because of the longer top tube. I have older (umm, more "vintage") frames with even longer (i.e., 57cm) top tubes & shorter stems (i.e., 90mm) + one recent "project" bike put together with "spare parts" which has a 56cm virtual top tube & a 100mm stem.
     


  2. SUPER RIDER

    SUPER RIDER New Member

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    I thank all of you who responded to my original post. I went out for a 75mile ride this morning, and no issue(s) whatsoever. No pain anywhere, just the regular muscle soreness that is part of regular intense cycling.

    I am gonna stay with my present set-up.

    Regards,
     
  3. Camilo

    Camilo New Member

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    I was just saying that there are different frame geometries that are intended for folks who don't like so much of a drop - not that you'd have to have it even, just that it would be easy to get less drop without using a steep upward angle or an extension than a full-on racing geometry like the CAAD8. Just a thought if /when you're shopping for a different frame. The solution you're talking about is exactly what I'd do if I were in your shoes.

    By the way, there's a chart somewhere on line that shows exactly what the effective stem length will be with various lengths and rises. You could probably figure it out with geometry too. But my guess is that 110/12 deg. is similar to 100/7 degree.

    Like I said, I have a CAAD7 which I believe is similar (identical?) geometry to a CAAD8. I'm shorter than you but also have legs that are a little "long" for my height, meaning my reach is a little shorter than average. I have a 54" frame which is very comfortable with a 90mm, 7 degree stem. I tried a 100, but it felt too long. I've tried both flipped up and down, and preferred up, the 1/2 inch difference in rise being significant. I never tried a 110 with a steeper angle, but would be interested if I could borrow one or find one cheap.

    If I'd gone with 52 cm frame, I could have more of a "normal" length stem (probably 100 or 110), but would need a steeper rise to get it up where I like it which is 1 1/2 or 2 inches below the seat, just because I'd have a couple cm more seat tube exposed with the 52.

    If/when I buy another frame, I'm going to try to find a differnt geometry that will allow a 0 to 1.5 inch drop, but with a shorter top tube so I could use a longer stem. I like the 'feel' and standover to my CAAD7 54cm though.
     
  4. SUPER RIDER

    SUPER RIDER New Member

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    Thanks for your response. About 2ins in drop is actually what my preference is, although I have not had any issues with my present 3.25ins drop.

    I most likely would be purchasing a carbon-framed bike in the next two years or so, and I'll have to think seriously about different manufacturers and how the geometry of their frames serve my purpose. The good news is that I have almost two years to think about this, and the bad news is that my body dimensions scream out for a custom frame, but a carbon custom frame would most likely entail my ending up in the poorhouse.

    will see how things go.
     
  5. pistole

    pistole New Member

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    - hi.

    - my 'shape' is kinda like you. Ie , am 5'8" but have long legs versus a short torso.

    - that's why I prefer my compact frames and short stems , versus my classic framed Fuji Team. It just feels better , esp when climbing.

    - have learnt that , for me , stem length and also the height of the hoods have a very profound effect on how the bike performs / feels. Before changing to the shorter stem for the Fuji , the reach was very 'strange' when compared to the compacts.

    - on the other hand , my riding buddy who is about the same height but short legged/longer torso , just loves his classic framed bike with the ubiquitous long stem (100mm).

    - as for the seat to bar drop , I think that as long as you're comfortable with it (and it probably is , since you can do a 75 mile ride with the rig) , leave it well alone. Spent alot of time dailing in the 'position' and once you have it spot on , thats it. A national-rider did comment on my seat/bar drop that if I was able to raise the bar a bit closer to the seat , it would aid my breathing (ie, helps with the expansion of the lungs) , hence I put it up by one spacer and , to be honest , didn't feel it either way.

    - cheers.

    .
     
  6. SUPER RIDER

    SUPER RIDER New Member

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    Thanks for the contribution Pistole. I think my flexibility is good enough to handle the 3.25" drop that I have on the rig right now, as I have no "physical" bones to pick with the current set-up . If things change, and I start having pain in different body parts that could be attributed to my "steep drop", then I'll definitely tweak the set-up using different length and angle stems.

    For now, so far, so good!

    Regards,

    Super Rider
     
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