Difficulty replacing tyre after puncture repair

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Michael Green, Jan 26, 2003.

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  1. On the way to work today I had my first puncture of the year. What was strange is that although the
    Continental Gatorskins (700cx23)were easy to fit initially (2 weeks ago) I had tremendous difficulty
    refitting them after the repair. The 'free' end of the bead retreated away as I forced on the other
    end with my thumbs. Even trying with the tyre levers was unsuccessful as the free ends moved away as
    the levers started to tension the bead. It was slightly wet underfoot but not raining. Any advice or
    ideas VERY VERY welcome. Thanks.
     
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  2. If you fit the tyre starting at the valve and tighten the valve locking ring down it should hold the
    bead in place as you work round the rim back toward
    it. Works for me anyhow.

    Michael Green <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On the way to work today I had my first puncture of the year. What was strange is that although
    > the Continental Gatorskins (700cx23)were easy to fit initially (2 weeks ago) I had tremendous
    > difficulty refitting them after the repair. The 'free' end of the bead retreated away as I forced
    > on the other end with my thumbs. Even trying with the tyre levers was unsuccessful as the free
    > ends moved away as the levers started to tension the bead. It was slightly wet underfoot but not
    > raining. Any advice or ideas VERY VERY welcome. Thanks.
     
  3. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Michael Green wrote:
    > On the way to work today I had my first puncture of the year. What was strange is that although
    > the Continental Gatorskins (700cx23)were easy to fit initially (2 weeks ago) I had tremendous
    > difficulty refitting them after the repair. The 'free' end of the bead retreated away as I forced
    > on the other end with my thumbs. Even trying with the tyre levers was unsuccessful as the free
    > ends moved away as the levers started to tension the bead. It was slightly wet underfoot but not
    > raining. Any advice or ideas VERY VERY welcome. Thanks.

    I suspect the cold played a part and made the tyre less supple (if it didn't shrink it?). Also,
    fitting tight tyres is murder with frozen hands.

    I don't really believe there is a great solution other than finding an easier-fitting tyre, but look
    through the following for some suggestions:

    http://groups.google.com/groups?q=tight+tyres&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en

    http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=tight+tires

    (etc)

    ~PB
     
  4. Frank

    Frank Guest

    "bob watkinson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > If you fit the tyre starting at the valve and tighten the valve locking
    ring
    > down it should hold the bead in place as you work round the rim back
    toward
    > it. Works for me anyhow.
    >
    Thanks, I've always wondered why people say you should start and finish at the valve.

    I've never used lock rings just one thumb on one end of the free bead and the other on the other end
    and work them simultaneously towards each other.
     
  5. "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:<avu8cb$jd2o7$1[email protected]>...
    > Michael Green wrote:
    > > On the way to work today I had my first puncture of the year. What was strange is that although
    > > the Continental Gatorskins (700cx23)were easy to fit initially (2 weeks ago) I had tremendous
    > > difficulty refitting them after the repair. The 'free' end of the bead retreated away as I
    > > forced on the other end with my thumbs. Even trying with the tyre levers was unsuccessful as the
    > > free ends moved away as the levers started to tension the bead. It was slightly wet underfoot
    > > but not raining. Any advice or ideas VERY VERY welcome. Thanks.
    >
    > I suspect the cold played a part and made the tyre less supple (if it didn't shrink it?). Also,
    > fitting tight tyres is murder with frozen hands.
    >
    > I don't really believe there is a great solution other than finding an easier-fitting tyre, but
    > look through the following for some suggestions:
    >
    > http://groups.google.com/groups?q=tight+tyres&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en
    >
    > http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=tight+tires
    >
    > (etc)
    >
    > ~PB
    Sound advice. I had another puncture today (puncture resistance? I don't think so) but I ran my
    thumb around the tyre sidewall when it started to tense. This forced the bead to detach from the
    sidewall of the wheel and made the tyre easy to refix by hand. Success!
     
  6. "Michael Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On the way to work today I had my first puncture of the year.
    What was
    > strange is that although the Continental Gatorskins
    (700cx23)were easy
    > to fit initially (2 weeks ago) I had tremendous difficulty
    refitting
    > them after the repair. The 'free' end of the bead retreated
    away as I
    > forced on the other end with my thumbs. Even trying with the
    tyre
    > levers was unsuccessful as the free ends moved away as the
    levers
    > started to tension the bead. It was slightly wet underfoot but
    not
    > raining. Any advice or ideas VERY VERY welcome. Thanks.

    To refit a tyre you start opposite the valve working around the rim attempting to keep the bead of
    the tyre in the well of the rim thus allowing the tyre to pass over the rim wall.

    If you start at the valve the tyre bead cannot drop into the well of the rim.

    PK
     
  7. Terry J

    Terry J Guest

    > I suspect the cold played a part and made the tyre less supple (if it didn't shrink it?). Also,
    > fitting tight tyres is murder with frozen hands.

    I have just realise dthat it is atthis time of year I have to get the tyre levers out again.I really
    think it is the cold shrinking the beads.
     
  8. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, peter.kidwell
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > To refit a tyre you start opposite the valve working around the rim attempting to keep the bead of
    > the tyre in the well of the rim thus allowing the tyre to pass over the rim wall.

    You might - I don't.

    > If you start at the valve the tyre bead cannot drop into the well of the rim.

    Start at the valve but push the valve stem inside the tyre as soon as you have both sides of the
    tyre on the rim. Hold the two seated sides together with your knees and work the rest of the tyre
    onto the rim.

    Hope you understand the above - it's easier to do than describe:)

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton on the Bicycle Island In the Global Village
     
  9. peter.kidwell <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Michael Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > On the way to work today I had my first puncture of the year.
    > What was
    > > strange is that although the Continental Gatorskins
    > (700cx23)were easy
    > > to fit initially (2 weeks ago) I had tremendous difficulty
    > refitting
    > > them after the repair. The 'free' end of the bead retreated
    > away as I
    > > forced on the other end with my thumbs. Even trying with the
    > tyre
    > > levers was unsuccessful as the free ends moved away as the
    > levers
    > > started to tension the bead. It was slightly wet underfoot but
    > not
    > > raining. Any advice or ideas VERY VERY welcome. Thanks.
    >
    > To refit a tyre you start opposite the valve working around the rim attempting to keep the bead of
    > the tyre in the well of the rim thus allowing the tyre to pass over the rim wall.
    >
    > If you start at the valve the tyre bead cannot drop into the well of the rim.
    >
    > PK
    >
    >

    Eh! Why? Utter nonsense!
     
  10. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    Terry J wrote:

    > I have just realise dthat it is atthis time of year I have to get the tyre levers out again.I
    > really think it is the cold shrinking the beads.

    I don't think so - I had a visit from the p*nct*r* fairy yesterday, found the bike parked in the
    hall in the office with a flat front - the tyre was still a bugger to get on even though it was
    warm. I think it's to do with being coated with salt and the water off the roads having washed out
    all traces of the talc or French chalk which makes life easier. Plus the fact that the tyre *knows*
    it's winter, so is expecting to make you cold and wet (tyres aren't clever enough to notice when
    it's not actually dark or raining, they just work on the fact that winter usually is).

    --
    Guy
    ===
    I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
    about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
    wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.
     
  11. Terry J <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I have just realise dthat it is atthis time of year I have to get the tyre levers out again.I
    >really think it is the cold shrinking the beads.

    I had to resort to tyre levers over Christmas. Very embarassing.
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> flcl?
     
  12. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    bob watkinson wrote:
    > peter.kidwell wrote:
    >> To refit a tyre you start opposite the valve working around the rim attempting to keep the bead
    >> of the tyre in the well of the rim thus allowing the tyre to pass over the rim wall.

    Easier said than done to keep the bead in (with ill fitting tyres).

    >> If you start at the valve the tyre bead cannot drop into the well of the rim.

    > Eh! Why? Utter nonsense!

    Agreed, though finishing at the valve can help prevent squashing the tube.

    With my easy-fitting tyres, I prefer to start at the valve to help keep the valve straight.

    ~PB
     
  13. Frank

    Frank Guest

    "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > bob watkinson wrote:
    > > peter.kidwell wrote:
    > >> To refit a tyre you start opposite the valve working around the rim attempting to keep the bead
    > >> of the tyre in the well of the rim thus allowing the tyre to pass over the rim wall.
    >
    > Easier said than done to keep the bead in (with ill fitting tyres).
    >
    > >> If you start at the valve the tyre bead cannot drop into the well of the rim.
    >
    > > Eh! Why? Utter nonsense!
    >
    > Agreed, though finishing at the valve can help prevent squashing the tube.
    >
    > With my easy-fitting tyres, I prefer to start at the valve to help keep the valve straight.
    >

    Ok now I'm totally confused.

    First the answer that it stopped the bead popping out sounded OK, then the answer that it allowed
    the bead to sit in the recess/channel/canal/middle seemed reasonable (I believe this very important
    to removing a tyre)

    I've always put the valve in first (push the valve stem in to avoid pinching) and finished opposite,
    if the valve isn't straight it is easy to pull the tyre gently through a full revolution before it
    is pumped.

    In the end tyres are always easier to put back on than they are to get off, aren't they?
     
  14. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Frankly Frank and all, I don't know what on earth the last few messages in this thread are on about.
    Talk about confusion! Anyway, people should remember that what works for one tyre and rim
    combination, won't necessarily be appropriate for another. Different tyres, even supposedly of the
    same size, can behave so differently because tyre and rim diameters (as well as widths) actually
    vary a bit - from make to make and model, and even from batch to batch. And folding tyres are
    different to rigid tyres, and some beads are stickier and more flexible than others. Rim tape can be
    a factor as well.

    Frank wrote:

    /snip confusion and more confusion!

    > I've always put the valve in first (push the valve stem in to avoid pinching) and finished
    > opposite, if the valve isn't straight it is easy to pull the tyre gently through a full revolution
    > before it is pumped.

    It's certainly not easy to do that with all tyres.

    > In the end tyres are always easier to put back on than they are to get off, aren't they?

    No.

    ~PB
     
  15. "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Frankly Frank and all, I don't know what on earth the last few
    messages in
    > this thread are on about.

    It's not rocket science Check out any book on cycling or the FAQ of rec.bicycles.tech for mending a
    puncture. They will all explain it to you.

    PK
     
  16. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    peter.kidwell wrote:

    >> Frankly Frank and all, I don't know what on earth the last few messages in this thread are
    >> on about.
    >
    > It's not rocket science.

    How many rocket scientists can fit a Schawlbe Blizzard Pro 22 to an MA2?
    :)

    > Check out any book on cycling or the FAQ of rec.bicycles.tech for mending a puncture. They will
    > all explain it to you.

    I desparately need that. Many thanks. It was funny I manage to write those detailed instructions on
    fixing a puncture then, wasn't it.

    ~PB
     
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