Disc brake pads

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Dick, Mar 27, 2003.

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  1. Dick

    Dick Guest

    I've been wrestling with a new set of XT discs latley. My rear has been perfect from day one, no
    prob, everythings cool. The front however is an entirely different story. When I first installed it
    the power and modulation was great but it had a squeal that a howler monkey couldn't touch, we're
    talking really loud from the second the pad hit the disc and varying tones with changing pressure.

    I tried breaking them in (lots of hard breaking from speed), roughed the disc and pads with emory
    cloth, cleaned everything with dawn, cleaned it again with rubbing alcahol, nothing had any lasting
    effect. Then in desperation I sprayed the disc with WD-40 and voalla, silence but then after a few
    hours of riding I started losing power, not too much mind you, but I can't lock them up any more.
    Cleaned everything again but still can't lock it up (it is still quiet though), I'm guessing the oil
    in the WD-40 ruined the pads. I also rebled the system with no appreciable gain in power.

    Um what was I asking... oh yea. So I'm thinking of trying some of those EBC pads but can't decide
    which compound to go for. I don't need monster stopping power, just enough to lock em up for some
    basic trials moves. The reviews on mtbr are too varied to skim any info from so I was hoping someone
    here could help.

    I'd also be willing to get another set of shimano pads if someone has a sure fire way to
    shut them up.
     
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  2. Stratton

    Stratton Guest

    >I'd also be willing to get another set of shimano pads if >someone has a sure fire way to
    >shut them up.

    If this was a car I would coat the REAR of the pads with copper slip grease, don't get any on the
    front of the pads. Not sure if this will work since no experience of disc brakes on bikes.

    Stratton
     
  3. Bruce Edge

    Bruce Edge Guest

    On Thu, 27 Mar 2003 13:37:05 -0600, Dick wrote:

    > I've been wrestling with a new set of XT discs latley. My rear has been perfect from day one, no
    > prob, everythings cool. The front however is an entirely different story. When I first installed
    > it the power and modulation was great but it had a squeal that a howler monkey couldn't touch,
    > we're talking really loud from the second the pad hit the disc and varying tones with changing
    > pressure.
    >
    > I tried breaking them in (lots of hard breaking from speed), roughed the disc and pads with emory
    > cloth, cleaned everything with dawn, cleaned it again with rubbing alcahol, nothing had any
    > lasting effect. Then in desperation I sprayed the disc with WD-40 and voalla, silence but then
    > after a few hours of riding I started losing power, not too much mind you, but I can't lock them
    > up any more. Cleaned everything again but still can't lock it up (it is still quiet though), I'm
    > guessing the oil in the WD-40 ruined the pads. I also rebled the system with no appreciable gain
    > in power.
    >
    > Um what was I asking... oh yea. So I'm thinking of trying some of those EBC pads but can't decide
    > which compound to go for. I don't need monster stopping power, just enough to lock em up for some
    > basic trials moves. The reviews on mtbr are too varied to skim any info from so I was hoping
    > someone here could help.
    >
    > I'd also be willing to get another set of shimano pads if someone has a sure fire way to shut
    > them up.

    I've used EBC red and green pads. I like the red because they require minimal finger pressure to
    lock yet still have good modulation. They wear very fast though, about 3 times faster than stock
    hayes pads. Oh, also, be careful when you're getting used to them or you'll end up on your head.

    -Bruce
     
  4. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    bruce edge wrote:
    > On Thu, 27 Mar 2003 13:37:05 -0600, Dick wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I've been wrestling with a new set of XT discs latley. My rear has been perfect from day one, no
    >>prob, everythings cool. The front however is an entirely different story. When I first installed
    >>it the power and modulation was great but it had a squeal that a howler monkey couldn't touch,
    >>we're talking really loud from the second the pad hit the disc and varying tones with changing
    >>pressure.
    >>
    >>I tried breaking them in (lots of hard breaking from speed), roughed the disc and pads with emory
    >>cloth, cleaned everything with dawn, cleaned it again with rubbing alcahol, nothing had any
    >>lasting effect. Then in desperation I sprayed the disc with WD-40 and voalla, silence but then
    >>after a few hours of riding I started losing power, not too much mind you, but I can't lock them
    >>up any more. Cleaned everything again but still can't lock it up (it is still quiet though), I'm
    >>guessing the oil in the WD-40 ruined the pads. I also rebled the system with no appreciable gain
    >>in power.
    >>
    >>Um what was I asking... oh yea. So I'm thinking of trying some of those EBC pads but can't decide
    >>which compound to go for. I don't need monster stopping power, just enough to lock em up for some
    >>basic trials moves. The reviews on mtbr are too varied to skim any info from so I was hoping
    >>someone here could help.
    >>
    >>I'd also be willing to get another set of shimano pads if someone has a sure fire way to shut
    >>them up.
    >
    >
    > I've used EBC red and green pads. I like the red because they require minimal finger pressure to
    > lock yet still have good modulation. They wear very fast though, about 3 times faster than stock
    > hayes pads. Oh, also, be careful when you're getting used to them or you'll end up on your head.
    >
    > -Bruce

    I've tried all 3 on both the front and back -- hayes mechanicals. The green works best for me. Red
    is ok, but slightly more prone to squeeling from grease contamination and seems to be slightly less
    powerful at braking; gold started squeeling on about day 3 and nothing I could do would make it stop
    -- and it didn't brake very well. SO, *I* recommend green (YMMV :)).

    My guess is that the rotors had a thin layer of protective grease or oil on them and you started off
    by immediately contaminating the pads. Best thing I've found for this is... mud! Smear it liberally
    on the rotor and brake. Repeat as necessary :). Best mud is the fine, but abrasive kind. Make sure
    that there're no stones in the mud or they get in the holes of the rotor and score the pads (not a
    show stopper, but to be avoided if possible). If I can't find mud, I get some dirt in the palm of my
    hand and make some with a little water from my hydration pak. I learned to rely on mud when I had an
    American Classic rear hub that used to dump grease on the rotor every couple of rides. Replaced it
    with a Chris King -- MUCH better hub AND service!

    David
     
  5. Derral

    Derral Guest

    Has anyone tried an abrasive household cleaner like "Comet", it might be better than instead of
    mud or sand.

    "David Kunz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > bruce edge wrote:
    > > On Thu, 27 Mar 2003 13:37:05 -0600, Dick wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>I've been wrestling with a new set of XT discs latley. My rear has been perfect from day one, no
    > >>prob, everythings cool. The front however is
    an
    > >>entirely different story. When I first installed it the power and modulation was great but it
    > >>had a squeal that a howler monkey couldn't touch, we're talking really loud from the second the
    > >>pad hit the disc
    and
    > >>varying tones with changing pressure.
    > >>
    > >>I tried breaking them in (lots of hard breaking from speed), roughed the disc and pads with
    > >>emory cloth, cleaned everything with dawn, cleaned it again with rubbing alcahol, nothing had
    > >>any lasting effect. Then in desperation I sprayed the disc with WD-40 and voalla, silence but
    > >>then after a few hours of riding I started losing power, not too much mind
    you,
    > >>but I can't lock them up any more. Cleaned everything again but still can't lock it up (it is
    > >>still quiet though), I'm guessing the oil in the WD-40 ruined the pads. I also rebled the system
    > >>with no appreciable
    gain
    > >>in power.
    > >>
    > >>Um what was I asking... oh yea. So I'm thinking of trying some of those EBC pads but can't
    > >>decide which compound to go for. I don't need
    monster
    > >>stopping power, just enough to lock em up for some basic trials moves. The reviews on mtbr are
    > >>too varied to skim any info from so I was hoping someone here could help.
    > >>
    > >>I'd also be willing to get another set of shimano pads if someone has a sure fire way to shut
    > >>them up.
    > >
    > >
    > > I've used EBC red and green pads. I like the red because they require minimal finger pressure to
    > > lock yet still have good modulation. They wear very fast though, about 3 times faster than stock
    > > hayes pads. Oh, also, be careful when you're getting used to them or you'll end up
    on
    > > your head.
    > >
    > > -Bruce
    >
    > I've tried all 3 on both the front and back -- hayes mechanicals. The green works best for me. Red
    > is ok, but slightly more prone to squeeling from grease contamination and seems to be slightly
    > less powerful at braking; gold started squeeling on about day 3 and nothing I could do would make
    > it stop -- and it didn't brake very well. SO, *I* recommend green (YMMV :)).
    >
    > My guess is that the rotors had a thin layer of protective grease or oil on them and you started
    > off by immediately contaminating the pads. Best thing I've found for this is... mud! Smear it
    > liberally on the rotor and brake. Repeat as necessary :). Best mud is the fine, but abrasive kind.
    > Make sure that there're no stones in the mud or they get in the holes of the rotor and score the
    > pads (not a show stopper, but to be avoided if possible). If I can't find mud, I get some dirt in
    > the palm of my hand and make some with a little water from my hydration pak. I learned to rely on
    > mud when I had an American Classic rear hub that used to dump grease on the rotor every couple of
    > rides. Replaced it with a Chris King -- MUCH better hub AND service!
    >
    > David
     
  6. "stratton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >I'd also be willing to get another set of shimano pads if >someone has a sure fire way to shut
    > >them up.
    >
    > If this was a car I would coat the REAR of the pads with copper slip
    grease,
    > don't get any on the front of the pads. Not sure if this will work since
    no
    > experience of disc brakes on bikes.

    This is good advice (and dammit I was going to post it!) and well worth trying. Make sure you use
    copper slip so that it stays in place...

    > Stratton
     
  7. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Derral wrote:
    > Has anyone tried an abrasive household cleaner like "Comet", it might be better than instead of
    > mud or sand.

    Interesting idea! I'll give it a try next time that I accidentally squirt chain lube in the wrong
    direction or forget and spray from the chain side onto the rotor (happens more often that I'd like
    to admit :).

    David

    > "David Kunz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>bruce edge wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Thu, 27 Mar 2003 13:37:05 -0600, Dick wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I've been wrestling with a new set of XT discs latley. My rear has been perfect from day one, no
    >>>>prob, everythings cool. The front however is
    >
    > an
    >
    >>>>entirely different story. When I first installed it the power and modulation was great but it
    >>>>had a squeal that a howler monkey couldn't touch, we're talking really loud from the second the
    >>>>pad hit the disc
    >
    > and
    >
    >>>>varying tones with changing pressure.
    >>>>
    >>>>I tried breaking them in (lots of hard breaking from speed), roughed the disc and pads with
    >>>>emory cloth, cleaned everything with dawn, cleaned it again with rubbing alcahol, nothing had
    >>>>any lasting effect. Then in desperation I sprayed the disc with WD-40 and voalla, silence but
    >>>>then after a few hours of riding I started losing power, not too much mind
    >
    > you,
    >
    >>>>but I can't lock them up any more. Cleaned everything again but still can't lock it up (it is
    >>>>still quiet though), I'm guessing the oil in the WD-40 ruined the pads. I also rebled the system
    >>>>with no appreciable
    >
    > gain
    >
    >>>>in power.
    >>>>
    >>>>Um what was I asking... oh yea. So I'm thinking of trying some of those EBC pads but can't
    >>>>decide which compound to go for. I don't need
    >
    > monster
    >
    >>>>stopping power, just enough to lock em up for some basic trials moves. The reviews on mtbr are
    >>>>too varied to skim any info from so I was hoping someone here could help.
    >>>>
    >>>>I'd also be willing to get another set of shimano pads if someone has a sure fire way to shut
    >>>>them up.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>I've used EBC red and green pads. I like the red because they require minimal finger pressure to
    >>>lock yet still have good modulation. They wear very fast though, about 3 times faster than stock
    >>>hayes pads. Oh, also, be careful when you're getting used to them or you'll end up
    >
    > on
    >
    >>>your head.
    >>>
    >>>-Bruce
    >>
    >>I've tried all 3 on both the front and back -- hayes mechanicals. The green works best for me. Red
    >>is ok, but slightly more prone to squeeling from grease contamination and seems to be slightly
    >>less powerful at braking; gold started squeeling on about day 3 and nothing I could do would make
    >>it stop -- and it didn't brake very well. SO, *I* recommend green (YMMV :)).
    >>
    >>My guess is that the rotors had a thin layer of protective grease or oil on them and you started
    >>off by immediately contaminating the pads. Best thing I've found for this is... mud! Smear it
    >>liberally on the rotor and brake. Repeat as necessary :). Best mud is the fine, but abrasive kind.
    >>Make sure that there're no stones in the mud or they get in the holes of the rotor and score the
    >>pads (not a show stopper, but to be avoided if possible). If I can't find mud, I get some dirt in
    >>the palm of my hand and make some with a little water from my hydration pak. I learned to rely on
    >>mud when I had an American Classic rear hub that used to dump grease on the rotor every couple of
    >>rides. Replaced it with a Chris King -- MUCH better hub AND service!
    >>
    >>David
    >>
    >
     
  8. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    spademan o---[) * <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "stratton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > >I'd also be willing to get another set of shimano pads if >someone has
    a
    > > >sure fire way to shut them up.
    > >
    > > If this was a car I would coat the REAR of the pads with copper slip
    > grease,
    > > don't get any on the front of the pads. Not sure if this will work since
    > no
    > > experience of disc brakes on bikes.
    >
    > This is good advice (and dammit I was going to post it!) and well worth trying. Make sure you use
    > copper slip so that it stays in place...

    Yep - thirded. I must say though, desperation or not, the WD40 thing was a

    Get new pads, keep them clean and safe. Remove the disc from hub, clean it _thoroughly_ with pure
    alcohol and/or detergent and a clean green scrubbing pad or similar. Re-install disc, fit pads with
    copper grease into calliper, keeping the grease well away from the friction areas.

    After this, get some fine-ish and wet mud (make some with garden dirt and plenty of warm water if
    you have to). Smear this all over the disc, and _then_ do the bedding in. Keep applying more wet
    mud as you go - discs should have good bite in no time, and hopefully, the squeal should have
    stopped too.

    Shaun aRe
     
  9. > pad or similar. Re-install disc, fit pads with copper grease into calliper, keeping the grease
    > well away from the friction areas.

    Is this copper grease just that ordinary copper grease one can find in any automotive store? Usually
    used on bolts and stuff?
     
  10. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >> Has anyone tried an abrasive household cleaner like "Comet", it might be better than instead of
    >> mud or sand.
    >
    >Interesting idea! I'll give it a try next time that I accidentally squirt chain lube in the wrong
    >direction or forget and spray from the chain side onto the rotor (happens more often that I'd like
    >to admit :).

    I always remove the pads before messing around back there. One overspray of chain lube onto my pads
    was enough for me.

    Also, I had some luck onece with boiling the pads in water.

    Conversly, I ruined my first set of Hope pads by following Hope's bed-in instructions too closely
    and dousing them with water. That started a squeal that I never got rid of until I bought new pads.
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
  11. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Juho Huttunen <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > pad or similar. Re-install disc, fit pads with copper grease into
    calliper,
    > > keeping the grease well away from the friction areas.
    >
    > Is this copper grease just that ordinary copper grease one can find in any automotive store?
    > Usually used on bolts and stuff?

    Yup, sure is!

    Shaun aRe
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I've been wrestling with a new set of XT discs latley. My rear has been perfect from day one, no
    > prob, everythings cool. The front however is an entirely different story. When I first installed
    > it the power and modulation was great but it had a squeal that a howler monkey couldn't touch,
    > we're talking really loud from the second the pad hit the disc and varying tones with changing
    > pressure.
    >
    > I tried breaking them in (lots of hard breaking from speed), roughed the disc and pads with emory
    > cloth, cleaned everything with dawn, cleaned it again with rubbing alcahol, nothing had any
    > lasting effect. Then in desperation I sprayed the disc with WD-40 and voalla, silence but then
    > after a few hours of riding I started losing power, not too much mind you, but I can't lock them
    > up any more. Cleaned everything again but still can't lock it up (it is still quiet though), I'm
    > guessing the oil in the WD-40 ruined the pads. I also rebled the system with no appreciable gain
    > in power.
    >
    > Um what was I asking... oh yea. So I'm thinking of trying some of those EBC pads but can't decide
    > which compound to go for. I don't need monster stopping power, just enough to lock em up for some
    > basic trials moves. The reviews on mtbr are too varied to skim any info from so I was hoping
    > someone here could help.
    >
    > I'd also be willing to get another set of shimano pads if someone has a sure fire way to shut
    > them up.
    >
    >

    You might want to consider Kool stop pads, they are cheaper and perform better than the stock pads.
    Well anything performs better than Shimano stock pads, no matter what type of brake it is.
    --
    _________________________
    Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
  13. > I'd also be willing to get another set of shimano pads if someone has a sure fire way to shut
    > them up.

    Dont use Shimano pads...

    Im using Fibrax Sintered pads. The best pads i have ever tried, but beware, they heat up pretty
    easily, but they brake and last!

    Peter
     
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